“We lost so much wheat that was destined for seed, which is very frustrating.”

Hagbergs had gone down to 76 and 83 due to the extensive rain last month, Mr Temple reported.

It will now all have to be sold as feed wheat, but with specific weights at a disappointing 73 kg/hl this is proving to be costly, he added.

“We‘ve been having to put an extra two forklift bucket loads into each trailer compared to last year – we‘re not going to break any records this year.”

His Robigus, Access and Claire yielded 9 t/ha (3.64 t/acre) according to the yield monitor on the combine.

Access stood up well while the parts of the other wheat got flattened by the wind and rain, he noted.

The oilseed rape yielded reasonably well at 3.7 t/ha (1.5 t/acre), although Mr Temple was hoping to get the average up to 4 t/ha (1.62 t/acre).

He only has 9ha (22 acre) to drill for next year‘s oilseed rape.

“The rain hasn‘t left the soil in good condition as it has lost all of its structure, so it is not going to spring out of the ground.”

He said he has had a very expensive year. “We‘ve not been working efficiently and on top of that we‘ve had the high price of diesel.”

“We‘re not inspired to invest. We cannot afford to spend as much money on the land as we would have liked. We‘re just going to do the absolute minimum.”