A NEW PROJECT to evaluate the effectiveness and potential use of rapid detection tests for mycotoxins in grain has gained Home-Grown Cereals Authority funding.

The six month project will evaluate the range of current “quick dipstick tests” available and look at their potential use in UK intake facilities, said the HGCA.

More work into mycotoxin testing is particularly relevant after many growers suffered rejection last year because loads contained more than five visible pink grains per kilogram, said Simon Edwards of Harper Adams University.

“Five grains per kilogram is not rational. This was a very risk adverse approach by the mills last year, and the cereal industry needs a rational and consistent approach to mycotoxins.”

“We need a distinct test, pass or fail.”

The project will be carried out by the Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association and initial results are anticipated later this year, said organisers.