Chris Hewis hoped to finish his spring barley today (19 September) at Habrough, Lincs, leaving four days’ combining in winter wheat.

“We’ve been struggling,” he said. He cut 12ha (30 acres) of Gladiator wheat at 10t/ha (4t/acre) three weeks ago, before moving onto the Tipple spring barley.

That averaged more than 7.4t/ha (3t/acre), which was very pleasing, said Mr Hewis – and it all went for distilling in Scotland.

He was now combining the late-drilled Cocktail spring barley at 14.5% moisture, which was yielding about 6.2t/ha (2.5t/acre).

That left 24ha (60 acres) of Gladiator wheat and 40ha (100 acres) of Einstein to cut. “It’s looking well, although most of it has a small amount of germination in it, and is looking shrivelled.”

He also had 8ha (20 acres) of Humber for seed, which was not showing any signs of sprouting.

The winter barley averaged over 7.4t/ha (3t/acre) and all made malting. However, there was still some straw lying in the fields seven weeks on, which was holding up rape drilling, said Mr Hewis.

He reckoned farmers still had about a quarter of their wheat to combine in the area.

Crop: Spring barley
Variety: Tipple
Area: 18ha (45 acres)
Yield: 7.4t/ha (3t/acre)

Crop: Spring barley
Variety: Cocktail
Area: 51ha (125 acres)
Yield: 6.2t/ha (2.5t/acre)

Crop: Winter wheat
Varieties: Gladiator
Area: 12ha (30 acres)
Yield: >10t/ha (4t/acre)

Crop: Winter barley
Variety: Flagon
Area: 50ha (120 acres)
Yield: >7.4t/ha (3t/acre)

Crop: Oilseed rape
Variety: Excalibur
Area: 21ha (52 acres)
Yield: 3.2t/ha (1.3t/acre)

 

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