Farmers are combining flat out today (29 August), trying to get as much done as possible before Sunday’s forecast storms.

Farmer Focus writer Richard Beachell had two good days of combining left to finish harvest at Field House Farm, Driffield, Humberside.

He was cutting Malacca winter wheat today, and was pleased with above average yields, although quality had been affected, with low protein and Hagbergs.

In Wiltshire Roger Moore was busy combining Viscount winter wheat for seed.

“It’s doing very well – we’ve got a job to keep up with the two combines with four 15t trailers,” he said.

Further East, Peter Wombwell had finished harvest at Rectory Farm, Saffron Walden, Essex, and was now on contract combining for neighbours.

“We’ve had some spectacular yields,” he said. Wheat had averaged 11.4t/ha (4.62t/acre) through the combine – well above average.

But in Worcestershire, Andrew Goodman had only started harvest on Monday.

He had made good progress since, finishing the spring barley with above average yields, and was now into the winter wheat.

Mike Cumming was enjoying a rare spell of sunny weather at Lour Farms, Ladenford, Angus, and was steaming through the spring barley harvest.

“We’re cutting 100 acres a day,” he said. “Yields are average, if not slightly below normal. If we average 6t/ha (2.45t/acre) we’ll be doing well.”

Saturday was forecast to be warm and dry with some sunshine in most areas, apart from the very far north-west, said the Met Office.

But it had issued an early warning for heavy showers and thunderstorms for eastern England and Scotland on Sunday (31 August).

 

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 Syngenta

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2008/09 variety with very high UK treated yields and the top score for resistance to lodging with PGR. Combined with an unbeaten second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, this new variety from Syngenta Seeds will help UK growers rise to the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

 

See the New Farm Crops website.