Harvest roundup: Thursday - Farmers Weekly

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Harvest roundup: Thursday

Unexpectedly damp conditions have delayed harvest slightly in parts of the country today (28 July), but overall progress is on par with the five-year average.


Harvest was progressing well at Meurig Raymond’s Trenewydd Fawr, Haverfordwest, Dyfed, despite being rained off this morning.

So far he had cut about 50% of the winter barley, and a third of the oilseed rape. “The oilseed rape was extremely pleasing. I think we’re averaging 4.7t/ha (1.9t/acre) so far.”

In Berkshire, Richard Brown had been combining oilseed rape at Priors Farm, Newbury, but had stopped today as the remainder was not fit.

“In places the Sesame did a good 5t/ha (2t/acre) but it wouldn’t have averaged that. Even so, it’s probably the best we’ve grown.”

Farmers had cut 30% of winter barley and 20% of oilseed rape by the end of Tuesday – about average for the time of year, according to the HGCA’s latest report.

Winter barley yields were very variable, but likely to be about 10% below the five-year average, while rapeseed yields were about 10% above average.

Richard Beachell was another farmer who was pleased with oilseed rape yields, having started combining at Field House Farm, Bainton, Humberside, yesterday.

The first field of Excalibur weighed in at 6.2t/ha (2.5t/acre) over the combine, with the second field at 4.3t/ha (1.75t/acre).

“Whether or not that’s 100% accurate I don’t know, but it looked a good crop and there was a fair bit of seed coming off.”

Although the odd bit of wheat had been cut around the country, it was still about a week away at Ouse Bank Farm, Great Barford, Bedfordshire, said Stephen Bumstead.

“I think it needs to be sprayed off – we’ve got so many green tillers in the tramlines – the spring barley is the same.”

Jonathan Tipples also expected to be into wheat next week, having finished combining oilseed rape at Reed Court Farm, Marden, Kent.

“The Fashion rapeseed was alright – it did 4t/ha (1.6t/acre) and the oil content looks very good at about 45%.”

Winter wheat would be ready to cut on Monday. “It looks okay, but it can’t be. Once we get into it we’ll see what damage the drought has done.”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Harvest is making slow progress, with the final 10% of crops either not quite fit or hampered by wet weather.


A report by ADAS for HGCA said that combines cut around 100,000ha (250,000 acres) of crops in the week to 14 September – about one third of the remaining area.

“There was good progress in England where conditions were drier, with most crops now harvested, other than small areas of linseed and field beans.

“However there was less progress in Scotland where most of the remaining crops are located.”

In Inverness, Jim Whiteford had finished harvest at Shandwick Mains, Castlecraig Nigg, Tain, with yields generally slightly below last year.

“We had a good two weeks of weather but at the weekend it went back to squally showers.”

Cereal harvest was almost complete in South West Scotland, but farmers need a few dry days to get the last of the crops cut and to start drilling.

Agrovista agronomist Richard Bray said farmers had a few fields of spring barley left to cut and bale, as well as some spring beans.

“The beans have been desiccated and we should combine them later this week if we get a dry spell.”

In Wales, Geoff Thomas had finished harvest at Pantycoch, Letterston, Haverfordwest, but said some farmers were still combining wheat and beans.

“We can’t complain this year – I thought the dry spell was going to do untold damage, and it has knocked the winter barley yields, but the spring barley has more than compensated for it.”

Further south, Troy Stuart only had linseed left to combine at Clyst St Mary, Exeter, Devon, after a frustrating harvest.

“We’ve done about 40ha (100 acres) of linseed so far – on a customer’s farm it yielded 1.2t/ha (0.5t/acre) but it did better on the home farm, at 2.2t/ha (0.9t/acre).”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Better than expected weather has enabled some farmers to continue combining, although showers continue to frustrate in places.


Farmers had cut more crops over the past week than in any other week of harvest, according to an ADAS report for HGCA.

Almost 800,000ha of crops were cleared (1.98m acres) in the week to 8 September, bringing the total combinable crop area harvested to over 90%.

In Co Down, Northern Ireland, farmers still had about 25% of their spring barley to cut, said Philip Davidson at North Down Grain.

“We haven’t had the heavy rainfall that other places have got, so we were on cutting yesterday (8 September). If we have a couple of good days most of the county will have finished.”

Better weather over the past week had also enabled harvest to catch up quickly at Lockdhu Farm, Nairn, Morayshire, said Hamish Forbes.

Harvest was about 80% complete in the area, and later drilled spring barley was not yet ripe, he said. “It looks fine, but it won’t be ready for about a week.”

In Lincolnshire, Steven Lunn cracked on with combining throughout the wet weather, and had finished harvest at Westville Farm, Boston, if not the grain drying.

“We tend to get on when nobody else is – we had some quality wheat and we just wanted to get it in the shed, and I’m glad we did, although we’re still drying a bit.”

Harvest had also gone relatively smoothly at Velcourt’s South West farms, although yields were variable, said Richard Williamson, regional farms director.

“On the chalk soils we had a generally good harvest, but any brash, sandy, gravel or poorly structured clay soil was not so good.”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Continued settled weather has seen combines out across the country, and quality of crops cut after the rain is better than many expected.


Wheat harvest was about 65% complete, according to research by ADAS for the HGCA, and yields were 3-4% below the five-year average.

“Some sprouting in wet crops has been reported but it is not widespread,” said the report. “Most crops are still meeting minimum standards.”

In Wales, contractor Glynn Jones was about 80% through harvest near St Asaph, and yields had been generally pleasing.

“I’m trying to cut some peas today (2 September) and they are as flat as a pancake. They’re doing about 2.5t/ha (1t/acre) – and are full of wild oats which have taken them down.”

Andrew Maddever hoped to finish harvest at Hall Farm, Whetstead, Suffolk, tomorrow, and was disappointed with yields.

“We got all the Gallant and Solstice milling wheat before the rain, and it all made over 13% protein, 79kg/hl and more than 300 Hagberg.

“But I don’t think we’ll quite manage 8tha (3.2t/acre) across all the wheats.”

In Northern Ireland, John Best had enjoyed a fantastic harvest at Acton House Farm, Poyntzpass, Co. Armagh.

“It’s going very well – it’s been as good a harvest as we’ve had in 20 years. We’ve had great growing conditions and we should finish tomorrow, which is well ahead of normal.”

But in Cornwall, there had not been many highlights to Charlie Watson-Smyth’s harvest at Tregirls Farm, Padstow.

“We finished two days ago – we’ve had the driest year since 1976 and yields to correspond.

“Quality was fine – the bushelweights were good, it’s just the crops were uniformly thin.”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Combines have been back out again in some parts of the country today (26 August), and a better weather forecast could see huge strides made over the weekend.


Gerald Erwin was combining today at Nutts Corner, Crumlin, Co. Antrim, and was reasonably pleased with yields.

“Moistures have been quite high at 22-25%, but we’re quite happy cutting at that because we’re getting it in and it will all be treated with Propionic acid, instead of drying.

“Quality is fairly good – it doesn’t seem to have been affected by the rain.”

Farmers in the North West were struggling to get grass silage and wholecrop cereals off, but better weather had enabled some to get on today, said John Geldard at Plumgarths, Kendal, Cumbria.

“People are getting quite desperate with the wholecrop cereals – although an awful lot can get done in just a matter of days.”

Harvest was about 60-70% complete in Shropshire, with 40-50% of the wheat now cut, according to independent agronomist Bryce Rham.

“Yields have been all over the place – light land is not clever, at about 7.4t/ha (3t/acre), but fertile, heavy land is yielding over 10t/ha (4t/acre) as normal.”

In Herefordshire, crops were starting to brackle under the wet weather, but an improving weather forecast could allow combines to get back out soon.

“It absolutely chucked it down yesterday (25 August),” said Philip Gorringe at Lower Blakemere Farm, Blakemere.

“But the outlook is apparently not too bad, with two weeks of reasonable good weather ahead.”

Richard Brown had nearly finished harvest at Priors Farm, Peasemore, Berkshire, but still had 206ha (510 acres) of contract combining to do.

“We are getting there – we may finish over the weekend if the forecast is right.”

However, son George had not combined for over a week at Sheepdrove Farm. “They don’t want to get on at less than 16.5% moisture, so we could have a few all-nighters to catch up there.”

About 40-50% of peas and 90% of beans were still in the field, and quality waas starting to suffer, said Salvador Potter at the Processors and Growers Research Organisation.

“Winter beans have not yielded as well as the past two years, but have done reasonably well.

“But spring beans are very susceptible to drought, and it did hammer them.”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Combines are continuing to dodge the showers, with forecasts proving wrong across much of the country.


In Wales David Price was about a third of the way through harvest at Presteigne, Powys, but was yet to start on oats or winter wheat.

“We have just had shower after shower – and the forecast has been an absolute joke.”

Saffron winter barley was poor, yielding just 6.4t/ha (2.6t/acre). “But it was a third successive cereal so we weren’t expecting much.”

In Scotland, fine weather saw Adrian Ivory combining today (19 August) at Strathisla Farms, Meigle, Perthshire.

“We started spring barley on 13 August and we’ll be 60% through it now. We’re getting on quite well, considering we had 5.5 inches of rain in July.”

Optic spring barley was yielding about average at 5.6-6.2t/ha (2.25-2.5t/acre), and quality was good at 1.3-1.4% nitrogen and 68.9kg/hl.

William Greenwood had been rained off at Swanborough Farm, Lewes, East Sussex, today, but hoped to be combining again tomorrow.

“It’s frustrating because we only have about four days left to finish harvest.”

So far he had cut 100ha (250 acres) of Einstein winter wheat, which was coming off at 15-17% moisture and yielding about average at 8.9t/ha (3.6t/acre).

James Stafford had been combining most of the week at Pickwick Lodge Farm, Corsham, Wiltshire, despite forecasts of frequent showers.

“We were meant to have a wet week, but we have cut every day until we got rained off last night. The wheat is over 20% today.”

So far he had finished combining oilseed rape and spring barley, and was about halfway through his wheat. “We’re getting on alright.”

In Northern Ireland, Robert Craig had finished combining winter barley at Carse Hall, Ballykelly, Co. Londonderry, and had 10-14 days before spring barley was ripe.

The first stand of Saffron yielded about 15% below average, at 8.6t/ha (3.5t/acre), while the second batch was closer to normal at 9.3t/ha (3.75t/acre).

“We cut it at 17-18% moisture, and although it was showery we got most of the straw in within a few days.”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Combines are still snatching crops between the showers, but many farmers remain frustrated by the weather.


In Suffolk, Nick Huxtable hadn’t started combining any wheat at Sir Richard Hyde-Parker Farms, Long Melford, although he had finished oilseed rape and spring barley.

“The wheat is fit, but we’ve been rained off several times. I tried it yesterday (12 August) but it was 22% moisture.”

With rain forecast most days until early next week, Mr Huxtable didn’t expect to be into wheat for almost a week yet.

But in Norfolk, Peter Seaman was combining wheat today at Great Farm, Norwich, despite a light rain shower this morning.

“We are punching a good hole in harvest – it has stayed fairly dry here,” he said.

However, the Claire, which was coming off at 15.2% moisture, was yielding at least 1t/ha (0.4t/acre) below average.

Harvest had been on hold for most of the week at Peter Fairs’ farms near Great Tey, Colchester, Essex.

“We had nearly an inch of rain on Tuesday, and we didn’t do anything at the weekend because of the showers.”

Wheat yields had been disappointing, and were 15% below last year. “Everything is ready – I just want some dry weather to get at it.”

In Yorkshire, Phil Dowson’s haymaking was rained off today at High House Farm, Richmond, Yorkshire.

But he had finished combining oilseed rape and was now waiting for the wheat to ripen. “It looks alright but it didn’t tiller that well, so it’s quite thin in places.”

In Co. Down, winter barley harvest was finished, and generally yields had been very pleasing, according to Charles Davidson at North Down Grain.

“The weather has been kind, and the crops are good, with plenty of straw. Generally, it’s very pleasing, and the better prices have given everyone a bit of a lift as well.”

Graham Furey expected to be into winter wheat by the end of the week at Castleview, Killyleagh, Co. Down.

Einstein and Alchemy winter wheat were standing well and looked good, he added. “But I don’t think they’re anything outstanding.”


Don’t forget – you can text us about yourharvest progress on 07537 402 287. Start your message with“fwharvest”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Combines are continuing to dodge the showers today (5 August), with yields still looking extremely variable.


In Norfolk, winter wheat yields were disappointing at Mark Means’ farm at Terrington St Clement, King’s Lynn.

Gallant grown on light soils was averaging 15% down on last year. “The lightest bits of the fields are 20% down, while on the heavier parts it is 10% down,” he said.

But yields were proving surprisingly reasonable at Priors Farm, Peasemore, Berkshire, where George and Richard Brown had cut peas, oilseed rape and wheat.

Prophet peas averaged 4.2t/ha (1.7t/acre), while Dimension oilseed rape came in dry at 3.9t/ha (1.57t/acre).

Viscount winter wheat was running at about 9.3t/ha (3.75t/acre), above the farm’s long-term average but below the past couple of years.

In Humberside, oilseed rape was too damp to cut at Richard Beachell’s Field House Farm, Bainton, Humberside, today, following a showery few days.

So far the Excalbur had yielded “remarkably well”, at 4.9t/ha (2t/acre), while Castille had been disappointing at 4t/ha (1.6t/acre).

Rapeseed had been very slow to ripen in the area, as Roundup spray had not worked very well this year, he added.

Harvest in Scotland was progressing apace, with winter barley almost finished south of the River Tay, according to Masstock agronomist Jim Rennie.

“General feedback has been good, although because of the severe winter we did lose plants and expectations were lowered.”

Wheat was still about two weeks away from ripening, and was likely to come at the same time as spring barley, causing logistical difficulties, he added.

But in Northern Ireland, harvest progress was slow, with many crops late following the cold spring, said Richard Kane from Broglasgow House, Myroe, Londonderry.

So far he had only cut 2ha (5 acres) of Retriever winter barley, which had yielded reasonably well, and 10ha (25 acres) of winter wheat for crimping.

“We keep getting rained off, and now I’m fitting a new tyre to the combine which we had to wait to get delivered. But everything is looking well.”


Don’t forget – you can text us about yourharvest progress on 07537 402 287. Start your message with“fwharvest”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Combines are dodging showers to continue cutting winter barley and oilseed rape – with some spring barley and winter wheat also underway.


Winter barley yields in Norfolk were about average – and were likely to be the best of this year’s crops, reckoned Andrew Dewing of Dewing Grain.

“Winter barley has done well – although yields are just average, the samples are lovely and almost all malting varieties are going into the malting bin.”

Oilseed rape yields were below average, and Mr Dewing expected yield and quality problems in both spring barley and wheat due to the dry season.

In sharp contrast to that, harvest had already broken two records at JV Farming, Martinsdown, Dorset, with the earliest start in memory and the highest oilseed rape yields ever.

Harvest started on July 9, and a 107ha (264-acre) block of Catana oilseed rape yielded more than 5t/ha (2t/acre) for the first time.

In Hampshire, Daniel Crawford was waiting for oilseed rape to ripen at Neatham Farms, Alton.

So far he had cut 15ha (37 acres) of Cabernet, which had yielded 5.25t/ha (2.1t/acre), with 5ha (12 acres) of Expert averaging 5.38t/ha (2.2t/acre) over the combine.

James Forrest had finished combining winter barley at Mowness Hall, Little Stonham, Suffolk, and was now also into oilseed rape.

The Sequel winter barley, grown on light land, averaged 7.5t/ha (3t/acre), while the Cassia on heavy ground yielded 9t/ha (3.6t/acre) – both about average for the farm.

“Considering how dry it’s been we were really very pleased with that.”

Barley and oilseed rape yields were similar to last year at Robert Timmis’s Home Farm, Lilleshall, Shropshire.

Cassia winter barley yielded 7.9t/ha (3.2t/acre) and Cubic oilseed rape came in at 4.74t/ha (1.92t/acre).

Oats, wheat and spring barley on light land had suffered in the drought, but wheat on heavier ground looked well, he said.

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Rain has frustrated attempts to combine across much of the country today (22 July), but many crops are still not ripe.

Harvest progress was about normal in Wiltshire, said Nick Brown, store manager at Wiltshire Grain.

“Winter barley seems to have a good bushelweight, and has been mostly dry – the highest we’ve had was 17%,” he said.

Nitrogen content for malting barley was on the low side, but acceptable. Oilseed rape also looked to be of good quality, with oil contents higher than normal, at 44-46%.

In Hampshire, Brian Totman finished combining his Saffron winter barley yesterday at Portway Farm, Andover.

“It performed well at nearly 3t/acre (7.4t/ha) – we couldn’t believe it.” The 16ha (40 acres) averaged a bold bushelweight of 72kg/hl, and was already being loaded out.

Nick Harding’s winter barley exceeded expectations at Preston Farm, Tarrant Rushton, Dorset, at over 8t/ha (3.2t/acre) – about average for the farm.

“I’m fairly pleased with that, in view of some of the marginal parts of the field.”

Winter barley also yielded well at Gerald Godfrey’s Great Common Farm, Beccles, Suffolk, particularly on the heavy ground.

“I think on the basis of that, the wheat will be alright, although I think the rape is likely to be a bit disappointing.”

Oilseed rape was yielding between 3t and 4t/ha (1.2-1.6t/acre) in North Weald, Essex, said Andrew Kerr from Wyldingtree Farm.

“Our own Palmedor high erucic rape is still three or four days away but conventional varieties are being cut in the area.”

Combines across other parts of the country were waiting to roll, with Jonathan Holland expecting to be into oilseed rape in about 10 days time at Littlecote, Hungerford, Berkshire.

In Kent, Robert Shove reckoned he would be combining wheat near Rochester next week. “A neighbour was cutting wheat today and it all looks fairly good.”

Harvest roundup: Thursday

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Harvest is almost complete across the country, with just a few fields left to finish up in Scotland and Northern Ireland over the weekend.

Jim Whiteford had finished combining at Shandwick Mains, Tain, Inverness, and expected most people to finish up this week.

His Viscount and Istabraq winter wheat yielded 10.4t/ha (4.2t/acre), while Waggon spring barley averaged 7t/ha (2.85t/acre).

In Kelso, Charlie Stewart had almost finished harvest at Merton Estates, with just spring oilseed rape left to cut.

“Our yields were not particularly brilliant this year because the winter crops went into such poor conditions – although the spring crops were alright.”

But in Yorkshire, winter wheat had done well at Phil Dowson’s High House Farm, Richmond.

“It’s been a frustrating, stop-start harvest, but we got a decent final week of sunny weather. It’s just the prices that are the biggest downer.”

Winter cereals also performed well at Charlie Watson-Smyth’s Tregirls Farm, Padstow, Cornwall, but spring crops were disappointing.

“It was too dry in the spring, so the Tipple spring barley yielded just below 2t/acre (5t/ha).”

Autumn-sown crops which established well yielded above average at Jamie Rogers’ White Hall Farm, Hampton Bishop, Hereford.

“Quality was good, and yields were good where the crops got away well, but on the heavier land they struggled a bit with flooding.”

In Northern Ireland, Richard Kane was cutting spring barley today (17 September) at Broglasgow House, Myroe, Londonderry.

“We’re about 80% through harvest – and most people have got about 10% left in the area.”

 syngenta seeds logo

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2009/10 variety with very high UK treated yields and a maximum 9 rating for resistance to lodging with and without PGR. Combined with the highest second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, Duxford will continue to help UK growers meet the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

Go to the Syngenta Seeds website

 

 

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Upload image to Harvest Highlights

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2009/10 variety with very high UK treated yields and a maximum 9 rating for resistance to lodging with and without PGR. Combined with the highest second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, Duxford will continue to help UK growers meet the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

Go to the Syngenta Seeds website

 

 

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Upload image to Harvest Highlights

Harvest conditions are atrocious across the North and West of the country, with combines sinking and crops looking battered.

In Perthshire, Adrian Ivory had suffered almost six inches of rain since 1 August.

“It’s as bad as last year. Combines aren’t far off sinking in, and trailers can only take half loads of corn, because they’re just sinking into the fields.”

In Kelso, Stuart Fuller-Shapcott’s Sweethope Farm was literally under water today (3 September), after about 37mm of rain in the past 24 hours.

“The bales are nearly floating down the fields,” he said. “I should think the rest of my malting barley will be failed, and I dread to think what my peas are going to be like.”

Torrential rain overnight had also scuppered Philip Gorringe’s chances of combining in Herefordshire.

“I don’t think anything is spoiling yet – most of what is left is late drilled. But the spring barley is quite fit and last night’s rain has battered it closer to the ground, so I suspect we’ll be losing heads.”

Bill Taylor had not combined for a week at Nafferton Farm, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, and was less than 40% through his wheat.

“It’s not horrendous – it’s just too damp to get on,” he said. “Some people are finished around here, but the rest of us are waiting for a break in the weather.”

In Berkshire, spring oilseed rape was all that was left to finish up at Stephen Whitby’s Rowley Farm, Wexham.

“It’s been a frustrating harvest and a real mixed bag. The light land really suffered in the drought in June – so crops on the heavier land did better.”

But in Cornwall, heavy rain yesterday meant yet another day not combining for John Moss at Howton Farm, Saltash.

“We’re having a rough time down here – we had 8.5” of rain in July, 18 days without rain in August – but interspersed with showers and fog – and 27mm of rain yesterday. It’s very depressing.”

 syngenta seeds logo

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2009/10 variety with very high UK treated yields and a maximum 9 rating for resistance to lodging with and without PGR. Combined with the highest second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, Duxford will continue to help UK growers meet the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

Go to the Syngenta Seeds website

 

 

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Upload image to Harvest Highlights

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2009/10 variety with very high UK treated yields and a maximum 9 rating for resistance to lodging with and without PGR. Combined with the highest second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, Duxford will continue to help UK growers meet the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

Go to the Syngenta Seeds website

 

 

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Upload image to Harvest Highlights

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2009/10 variety with very high UK treated yields and a maximum 9 rating for resistance to lodging with and without PGR. Combined with the highest second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, Duxford will continue to help UK growers meet the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

Go to the Syngenta Seeds website

 

 

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Combines are out in force today across most of the country, with yields proving extremely variable.

In Co. Armagh, John Best was making a start on his oats, having finished oilseed rape yesterday.

He was hoping for a dry weekend, as he planned to take part in a record-breaking attempt of combining a 57ha (140-acre) field with 120 combines.

Geoff Thomas had also finished oilseed rape and winter barley at Pantycoch Farm, Haverfordwest, and was thrilled with yields all round.

The Flash oilseed rape yielded 5.3t/ha (2.1t/acre) at 12-15% moisture, while the Carat winter barley did well over 7.4t/ha (3t/acre).

In Hampshire, Tim Sykes was just making a start on winter wheat today, after finishing spring barley with pleasing yields of 6.2t/ha (2.5t/acre).

Oilseed rape had yielded 20% below average, having shed seed after being sprayed off for too long in the wet weather.

Wheat was also underway at David Reynolds’ Geddington Farms, Kettering, Northamptonshire, where harvest started 10 days later than normal.

He finished 1012ha (2500 acres) of oilseed rape on Monday, and said yields were better than expected at just over 3.7t/ha (1.5t/acre).

In Kent, Clive Apps was contract combining spring barley today, and said yields were a bit disappointing.

Winter wheat had been pleasing, averaging 9.9t/ha (4t/acre), but it was prices that were a major blow. “They’re below the cost of production.”

Further north, in Norfolk, drought in May had really knocked yields, said Bob Clabon of Rookery Farm, North Walsham.

Both winter wheat and winter barley had yielded below average, while spring barley had done slightly better, at 6.9-7.2t/ha (2.8-2.9t/acre).

 syngenta seeds logo

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2009/10 variety with very high UK treated yields and a maximum 9 rating for resistance to lodging with and without PGR. Combined with the highest second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, Duxford will continue to help UK growers meet the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

Go to the Syngenta Seeds website

 

 

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Harvest continues to be a localised affair, with some farmers getting ready to finish winter wheat, while others struggle in torrential conditions.

Agronomist John Snowball said two farmers would be finishing wheat in East Essex tomorrow (7 August), and in general yields and quality had been exceptional.

“Everybody is well pleased with their wheat – I haven’t spoken to a farmer who’s been disappointed yet.”

Further north, Carl Tuer had finished winter barley near Alnwick, Northumberland, leaving him without any crops ready to combine.

“We won’t be combining now for another 10 days – I have never known a time when we’ve been ahead of our Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire friends.”

Farmers had generally finished winter barley in the area, but had not made a start on rapeseed, making harvest about 20% complete, he said.

But in the middle and west of the country, incessant rain continued to keep combines at a standstill.

“We have had absolutely diabolical weather,” said Robert Tallis in Leicestershire. “The rain just seems to have settled over the middle of the country.”

One farmer near Ashby-de-la-Zouch said his harvest was twice as bad as last year’s, after receiving 174mm of rain in July and August so far, compared with 141mm in the whole of July and August last year.

Conditions were similarly soggy in Powys, Wales, although David Price had managed to get on with his winter barley today, combining at 18% moisture.

The crops still looked good, and there was plenty of time for the wheat and oats to ripen, he said.

Torrential rain in Wiltshire destroyed Martin Smart’s chances of combining near Trowbridge until the weekend.

“The forecast was fine – but it’s pouring. Some of the rape has been sprayed off for up to four weeks and things are starting to get desperate.”

Unfortunately, further rain was on the way, with the Met Office issuing a severe weather warning for today and tomorrow across central and Eastern England.

 

 syngenta seeds logo

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2009/10 variety with very high UK treated yields and a maximum 9 rating for resistance to lodging with and without PGR. Combined with the highest second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, Duxford will continue to help UK growers meet the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

Go to the Syngenta Seeds website

 

 

Harvest roundup: Thursday

Showers are making harvest something of a lottery today, with some farmers able to get on at last, while others remain at a standstill.

In Portaferry, Co.Down, Raymond Wilson hoped to be combining this afternoon (30 July) after yesterday’s heavy rain caused delays.

So far he had cut 40ha (100 acres) of Volume and Camion winter barley, both of which had performed well at up to 9.9t/ha (4t/acre).

Harvest was probably only about 5% complete in the area, he said.

In the Scottish borders Neil Thomson was combining winter barley after being rained off since 13 July.

“The barley is all still standing, which is remarkable, and travelling is alright.”

But in Wiltshire rain continued to frustrate David Hues’ efforts to make a start on his oilseed rape.

So far he had cut about 140ha (350 acres) of Sequel winter barley, and was pleased with above average yields.

Jonathan Lloyd was also rained off in Norfolk, having finished the winter barley and the best of the oilseed rape.

“The worst of the pigeon-damaged crops are still to come. We’ve also got some that’s had some hail damage.”

Rain damage was also beginning to concern Alistair Pinkerton at Blackbird’s Farm, Hertfordshire, where harvest finally got underway this afternoon, four weeks after spraying off oilseed rape.

 “I’d like to have started a fortnight ago but we’ve just had continual showers. We don’t want any more heavy rain as I think we could start to see some pod shatter.”

 syngenta seeds logo

Duxford winter wheat is an HGCA Recommended List 2009/10 variety with very high UK treated yields and a maximum 9 rating for resistance to lodging with and without PGR. Combined with the highest second wheat yield and a balanced disease resistance profile, Duxford will continue to help UK growers meet the challenge of producing more grain profitably.

Go to the Syngenta Seeds website

 

 

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