Farmer filling his sprayer with insecticide© Tim Scrivener

Agrochemical company Dow AgroScience could have a new insecticide product available by 2018, subject to approval.

The systemic and translaminar active sulfoxaflor – named “isoclast” by the company – works on the central nervous system of insects and is a completely novel mode of action for the UK.

Dow insecticide product manager John Sellars says the product will be aimed at controlling aphids resistant to pyrethroids or carbamates in cereal, potato and veg crops. In the future, the company may also consider registration for use in oilseed rape.

“It has a relatively low toxicity to bees and beneficials and is taken up rapidly by the plant, so has a good environmental profile.

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“We see it fitting in well with an integrated approach. Pyrethroids are under regulatory pressure and growers are running out of tools, so this represents something unique,” says Mr Sellars.

Organophosphate revival

It is not just new insecticide actives that can help with resistance management and US-based agrochemical company Gowan is gathering data for a potential European registration of organophosphate active phosmet.

The company’s UK and Ireland technical manager Robert Plaice says that the timeline to its potential availability is unclear, but phosmet has some useful IPM properties important in modern farming.

“It could potentially represent a tool to help control pyrethroid resistant pests in oilseed rape, while helping to extend the longevity of these [pyrethroid] products,” he adds.

Organophosphates have recently been subject to strict regulatory scrutiny within the EU.