A new Group 3 capable of fulfilling all the main soft wheat markets appears the most exciting wheat addition to the new HGCA Recommended List.


In other crops new yield benchmarks have been set for conventional OSR and malting barley varieties.

Plantings of Group 3 varieties have declined from a peak market share of over 50% when Consort, Claire and Robigus were at their height to just 12.5%. Hopes that last year candidates Viscount and Cassius would bring some balance back were dashed by both varieties failing to make nabim’s Group 3 classification.

So the introduction of Invicta, which yields 3% higher than Robigus and 4% ahead of Scout, last year’s Group 3 newcomer, was likely to be the best received new recommendation, HGCA’s Jim McVittie said at a press launch of HGCA’s Recommended List for 2010/11.

“Group 3s have stagnated and we’ve had lots of false starts, with the withdrawal of Rocky a couple of years ago and last year’s decisions.

“Invicta has high yields and suitability for all three soft wheat markets: Biscuits, distilling and export.”

There were some provisos with that statement, however, he admitted. While its biscuit performance appeared similar to Robigus, which was well-liked and widely used, it was provisionally only rated as medium for distilling.

That put it in the same group as Robigus and Consort, but not as good as Riband, which is still seen as the standard for distilling. Fellow new recommendation, Beluga, might make a better bet for that market.

Invicta could also be used in export markets, but it is only suitable for blending. “It is like Alchemy. It can contribute to a boatload of wheat, but can’t be the whole boat.”

A low Chopin alveograph reading was the cause of that classification, Dr McVittie said. “Grain quality is reasonable, although you would probably prefer the specific weight to be above 76kg/hl, rather than just below.”

It is also quite late maturing, ranking as an extra three days compared with Solstice, the latest on the new RL. “In some conditions it won’t make much difference; all varieties will mature at the same time. But in marginal conditions it could be up to a week later. The difference between a -3 and +3 on the list can be as much as 10-12 days.”

Disease resistance was good, with sixes for mildew and Septoria tritici, a seven for brown rust, and, importantly, an eight for yellow rust. “But it doesn’t have orange wheat blossom midge resistance.”

Another Group 3 variety Warrior has been added to the list as a special recommendation for its good disease resistance. “All the foliar diseases are rated at seven and above.”

It also has orange wheat blossom midge resistance. Those factors combine for an untreated yield of 91% of the controls, 5% ahead of the next best, and 17% better than Robigus.

But its market acceptance is not quite so positive. Biscuit quality doesn’t appear to be a problem – it has routinely met the biscuit wheat criteria and shown consistency in its dough – but it is rated as poor for distilling and does not meet the criteria for export.

“We don’t want to act as a barrier [to better disease resistance]. Whether it will be taken up, I don’t know, but it won’t be if we don’t recommend it,” Dr McVittie said.

 

Invicta

Robigus

Warrior

Scout

Yield

103

100

100

99

Specific weight

75.5

76.8

75.3

78.5

Lodging

8

7

7

8

Earliness

+3

+1

+1

+2

Mildew

6

6

7

6

Yellow rust

8

2

9

9

Brown rust

7

6

9

9

Septoria tritici

6

6

7

6

OWBM

R

R

R