He has harvested 250ha (620 acres) already and plans to cut another 16ha (40 acres) this afternoon. He has been forced to wait after his farm received heavy dew last night.

“We can see the light at the end of the tunnel now.”

“We haven‘t had the combine stuck recently. We‘ve put some wide tyres on it.”

Mr Hinchliffe is happy with yields. His first wheats, which were mostly Rogibus, yielded 10.5 t/ha (4.25 t/acre) while the second wheats – mainly Access, Cordiale and Consort yielded 9 t/ha (3.64 t/ha).

He was particularly pleased with the high yields produced by his Rogibus and that it was a little bit ahead of the other varieties.

Recently he has been harvesting at 13% moisture, allowing him to clear the backlog on the drier and not have to pay for diesel as he can put crops straight into the shed.

The majority of the wheat was, and still is, standing, but there were some patches where 30% of the wheat had become lodged.

Mr Hinchliffe wants to make a start on the 60ha (150 acres) of beans tomorrow (Sept 7). His Wizard winter beans are ready to harvest while his Quattro and Synchro spring beans will be ready soon.

“If the weather remains dry then we‘ll be finished this time next week apart from one field of linseed.”

Because of the wet weather he has been unable to get the wheat off the field quickly enough and as a result he has yet to drill any oilseed rape.

“I‘m not really concerned with it. The soil is still very warm and there‘s plenty of moisture in the soil to let me do it later in the month.”