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Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

Last post Sun, Feb 24 2013 17:27 by glasshouse. 59 replies.
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  • Fri, May 11 2012 1:01 In reply to

    • bovril
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    the cornish ba#t*rd:

     Oh dear God!

    I just agreed with Motley!

    Confused 

    Steady on! I did that last week, and I'm nearly fully recovered now!
  • Fri, May 11 2012 23:04 In reply to

    • old mcdonald
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    As I posted on another thread Motley is maturing (he was 58 a few weeks ago) just like a good Vintage Port, so of course we are agreeing with him now, whereas we did not in the past. We accept that we have difficulty in deciding what is meant in some of his posts, but that is just the nuances of flavours coming through. Port, like Motley, is a blend of several varieties from different vineyards, and so it takes a long time for them all to come together to give the desired result, but several of us now know that he is getting there and I look forward to his full maturity - that is when he becomes a Bed Blocker in two years time. I think it will be worth waiting for, although I am not so sure I would want to have a few dozen in my cellar.

    www.oldmcdonaldsolives.com
  • Fri, May 11 2012 23:43 In reply to

    • bovril
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    old mcdonald:

    Motley is just like a good Vintage Port,

    I'd say more like draught Stella lager. It doesn't agree with me, I don't like it, and it makes me angry!

    (Please note this is a joke, and isn't to be taken literally! I just couldn't miss the opportunity!)
  • Mon, May 14 2012 20:25 In reply to

    • old mcdonald
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

     It is a good one though!!

    www.oldmcdonaldsolives.com
  • Tue, May 15 2012 22:20 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    old mcdonald:
    that is when he becomes a Bed Blocker in two years time.
     

    Anyone who comes between me and my bed ain't gonna be around long enough to "mature"!

    "Dogs look up to us, cats look down on us, but pigs treat us as equals." (Sir Winston Churchill)
  • Tue, May 15 2012 23:39 In reply to

    • Peter Wells
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    Ananda:
    In UK, you can check Morrison's Facebook page, thousands are no longer shopping there since they started feeding animals GM feed, same story with Sainsbury's. You calculate the cost. Tesco is one of the few sticking with GM-free feed with whom I have also shopping now rather than Sainsbury's and I haven't seen queues I am seeing now before. People don't want GM food and for many, many very good reasons. Monsanto will have a tough time showing it down our throats

    So. Tesco's is doing well and it is down to their sticking with GM free ingredients is it.

    A quick google will support your view. Or will it?

    Financial Times - 4 hours ago
    The top 5000 managers at Tesco , including executive directors, are set to see their bonuses slashed after the group's worst performance in ...
  • Thu, May 17 2012 16:56 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

     Hi all

    Just a heads up - next week on FWi we're holding a live Q&A with two leading GM crop scientists - including one who helped put together the original project proposal at Rothamsted.

    It'll take place next Thursday 24 May at 1-2pm, but if you can't make it along, feel free to post your questions on this thread and we'll try to use as many as possible during the discussion.

    Whatever your stance on GM technology, it should be quite a unique opportunity to learn more about the trials from the inside and get any questions answered ahead of the planned protests.

    Deputy Community and Farmlife Editor at Farmers Weekly
  • Thu, May 17 2012 22:57 In reply to

    • old mcdonald
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    PW, It is a great pity that such a post is lost on those who do not want to hear.

    www.oldmcdonaldsolives.com
  • Mon, May 21 2012 12:01 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    Here's an interview which FW did with Rothamsted Research director, Maurice Moloney.

    http://www.fwi.co.uk/Articles/18/05/2012/132986/Meet-the-man-behind-the-GM-wheat-trial.htm

     

    For a round-up of quirky rural news see my blog Field Day
  • Mon, May 21 2012 12:08 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    A man has been charged with criminal damage after vandalism to the Rothamsed trial...

     http://www.fwi.co.uk/Articles/21/05/2012/133018/Man-charged-following-GM-vandalism.htm

    For a round-up of quirky rural news see my blog Field Day
  • Mon, May 21 2012 14:07 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

     Good thing they charged him. Lets hope that they throw the book, and that all the companies involved sue him for the cost of the damage and ruin him.

    Not for print please.
  • Mon, May 21 2012 14:48 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    Tesla

    Unfortuneatly the companies cannot sue him because there are no commercial interests involved in funding this GM wheat trial.

    And I think I'm right in saying that, of all the GM trials since the end of the Farm Scale Evaluations (in 2000?), its only the BASF nemotode potato trial that has had commercial funding - all the others have been funded by our levy contributions and the taxpayer.

  • Mon, May 21 2012 19:28 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

     Provided someone can quantify the damage in a financial sense, someone can attempt to recover it. And they should do.

    Not for print please.
  • Wed, May 23 2012 18:06 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    If you're interested in this subject, don't forget - there's a live Q&A with two leading GM crop scientists on FWi tomorrow (Thursday 24 May) at 1-2pm.

    http://www.fwi.co.uk/Articles/23/05/2012/132971/Rothamsted-scientists-to-answer-your-questions.htm

    For a round-up of quirky rural news see my blog Field Day
  • Wed, May 23 2012 23:22 In reply to

    • AllyR
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    My question:-    Some agricultural academics who are against GM's say that there are other ways of getting similar results, ie: normal plant breeding and selection, but it just takes longer. How true is this statement?
    When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
  • Thu, May 24 2012 8:34 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    AllyR:
    My question:-    Some agricultural academics who are against GM's say that there are other ways of getting similar results, ie: normal plant breeding and selection, but it just takes longer. How true is this statement?


    Thanks Ally
    Deputy Community and Farmlife Editor at Farmers Weekly
  • Thu, May 24 2012 10:05 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    AllyR

    I response to your question.

    The short answer is that GM offers a quick fix breeding route but given the problems of trialling and commercialising GM varieties in the UK and EU the slower conventional breeding route is probably quicker in the long run.

    The longer answer is that as understanding of genes and their expression increases, especially through the use of genome sequencing, breeders are now equipped with a greater understanding and more powerful tools than they ever had before allowing for the conventional breeding process to be speeded up.

    This has opened up the potential to develop desirable traits without having to modify the genetic material through the introducion of genes from outside the plant. There's some great work going on at the Watkins Collection identifying desirable traits in historic wheat varieties that predate the green revolution that could be of real and lasting benefit to growers; and also a project at the James Hutton looking to develop a nonGM blight tolerant potato variety using the knowledge gained from the sequencing of the potato genome.

    Biotechnology is an evolving science - like computer science -  so GM plants developed 20 plus years ago are about as useful as an Amstrad computer today. Thats part of the problem with this GM wheat trial. The original trait was developed on the 80s - OK the pheromone gene is now a synthesised version of the natural peppermint gene - but the technology is very dated.

    I think as biotechnology developes into a more elegant solution than the dated GM technology there is enormous potential for the development of varieties that meet the needs of growers and are acceptable in the marketplace.

  • Thu, May 24 2012 13:05 In reply to

    • AllyR
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    Branstonfen, that is an excellent post, Thank you for that.

        You actually address one of my problems for and against GMs. That is : Question 2, if you like, "If a good blight resistance potato is developed as a GM variety, what is going to happen to the Scottish Seed Potato industry when our ruling political party are absolutely against GM crops here?" - Which brings me to the question, Question 2a, if you like: "How long is it before a GM developed plant may be deemed to be no longer a GM risk (whether it ever was or not) and therefore be allowed to be grown as ordinary crop?

        I believe that one day crops which have had characteristics initiated using GM science will be grown by Organic farmers. Does anyone agree?

    When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
  • Thu, May 24 2012 14:42 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

     For those that missed it, a transcript of this afternoon's Q&A with GM crop scientists:

    http://www.fwi.co.uk/Articles/2012/05/24/132971/rothamsted-scientists-live-qa-transcript.html

    Ally - thanks for your qns, managed to squeeze one or two of them in :)

    Deputy Community and Farmlife Editor at Farmers Weekly
  • Thu, May 24 2012 15:37 In reply to

    • AllyR
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    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    I've managed to run through the Q&A, Thanks for passing on my question Rachel. 
    When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
  • Fri, May 25 2012 9:17 In reply to

    Re: Anti-GM protesters aim to rip up trial

    Tesla thanks for the compliment.

    In answer to both your questions I don't believe that a GM potato will ever be acceptable to consumers in this country or in Europe - even if the GM potato was genuinely blight tolerant - so I dont believe that the Scottish seed industry will ever be growing GM potatoes and neither will organic farmers be growing GM potatoes,

    The GM blight tolerant potato developed at the JIC and trialled over the past two years had limited resistance to blight - possibly because the GM potato only had one resistance gene inserted whereas a the conventional bred blight tolerant potato Sharpo Mira which is very blight tolerant, even to the virulent Blu13 strain, has 3 or 4 resistance genes. More at www.sarvari-trust.org.

    However as potato breeders move away from the dated method of Genetic Manipulation and start to employ newer tools like Genome Sequencing and Marker Assisted Selection to speed up the convention breeding process I think its very probable that conventional varieties will be developed that will be genuinely blight tolerant, meet the needs of growers and be accepted in the marketplace. As I said in my previous post the James Hutton institute is working on this. More at http://www.fwi.co.uk/Articles/30/04/2012/132667/Potato-genome-mapping-benefits-within-a-decade.htm

    Lets hope James Hutton Institute is successful, and quickly, but in the meantime I think its a great pity that our potato industry is not looking more carefully at the blight tolerant Sarpo potato varieties that are on the national seed list and are proving popular with gardeners and organic growers but sadly are being ignored by conventional growers.

  • Fri, Dec 28 2012 19:43 In reply to

    • skeel
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    Ian Piggot opinion 28.12.12

    So, GM Sells newspapers, no news there.  Ive noted that FW has become increasingly pro-GM to the point that any news questioning the science is relegated to a few measly column inches (akin to a sweep under the carpet) whereas anything pro-GM is given major headline attention  - who or what is driving this? The fact is that there is no 'independent evidence' available to back GM. 

    When I raised this issue with a senior govt. scientific official recently, I was told that independent research was unlikely to emerge due to lack of funding.  Forget Luddites and GM paranoia what we need is scientific evidence we can trust.

    Mr Pigott speaks of Africa suffering amid GM paranoia in Europe, a novel approach to this debate, - how about we cut the aid to Africa (as senior and respected Africans and commentors have asked us to do) and plough money into wholly independent GM research which ought to guide future policy with a degree of confidence?

     No-one is anti-GM for the sake of it, but it is worrying when the only [so called] 'independent' evidence (French) is immediately rubbished without more and a multi-national expends 28 million USD to keep consumers ignorant of the fact that certain food products contain GM? 

    In future, please FW would you please deal with this issue in an even handed way?  Your partisan approach is downright unhelpful to those of us are genuinely concerned about the issue and need to know the facts; presented in a balanced informative way.

  • Fri, Dec 28 2012 23:11 In reply to

    • Peter Wells
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    Re: Ian Piggot opinion 28.12.12

    This is the third posting from Skeel since he joined the forum. All have been on the topic of GM.

    Maybe you may wish to give us your views on one of the many other topics under discussion or even start another one on say, alternative systems/methods of agriculture.

    I did read recently that crops yields have now plateaued and the assumption behind the article was that shouldn't have, but that yields can continue to pushed ever upwards. What are your views on that? 

  • Fri, Dec 28 2012 23:43 In reply to

    Re: Ian Piggot opinion 28.12.12

    Peter Wells:
    This is the third posting from Skeel since he joined the forum. All have been on the topic of GM.
     

    Lot's of trolls on here recently Peter, not mentioning any names.....

    but it annoys me when people come on here pretending to want advice but have other agendas

    http://www.holidaycambriancoast.co.uk/

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  • Fri, Dec 28 2012 23:55 In reply to

    • henarar
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    • zumerzet

    Re: Ian Piggot opinion 28.12.12

    Then you get the ones that just like to post silly comments they are worse than all the rest

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