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GMO Trial

Last post Fri, May 11 2012 17:17 by branstonfen. 9 replies.
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  • Sat, May 5 2012 17:58

    • Ananda
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Sat, May 5 2012

    GMO Trial

    Here is an interesting article for those of you who believe that GMOs will ever work, nothing short of a catastrophe is developing in the USA:

    http://www.delawareonline.com/proart/20120418/business06/120417035?pagerestricted=1

    Scary stuff, don't you think. Americans are in it up to their necks by the looks of it so the next step is to try and spray their way out of it but I don't think it will happen. Would you like to know why, here is why - please note that 'rapidly herbicide resistant weeds' bit:

    http://uk.reuters.com/article/2012/04/18/us-crops-petition-idUKBRE83H0L020120418

    I guess we have reached the point when biotech companies can lie as much as they like but the truth about GMO danger cannot be hidden any longer:

    http://www.responsibletechnology.org/posts/?p=2070

    So, as far as US is concerned in a few years time napalm will be the only thing that works against these Hulk type weeds resistant to anything that mankind can throw at them. Give it 5 years and they will develop pesticide that will obliterate every living thing in radius of a mile at the cost of $1000 per acre, as opposed to $45 in the good old days when Monsanto didn't rule the world. Is this the path that any of you would like to take?

    Oh yes, Australians are doing well too:

    http://gmwatch.org/latest-listing/1-news-items/13871-monsanto-props-up-weak-gm-crop-price

    Who knows, maybe they are having fun in India:

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/News-Feed/Business/Ministry-blames-Bt-cotton-for-farmer-suicides/Article1-830798.aspx

    They are not by the looks of it. Three continents - same story. 

    I tried publishing this comment on Rothamsted's website but with no success. I bet they will blame it on their forum's software.

  • Thu, May 10 2012 14:58 In reply to

    • motley
    • Top 150 Contributor
      Male
    • Joined on Mon, Mar 30 2009
    • Suffolk

    Re: GMO Trial

    GM is a thing indeed.

     It is a joy, the human use of tools.

    Now where are you as a consummer on the use of rennet starter for cheese? tomato paste for your pizza? cotton in your clothing? do you eat wine gums? What about the oil seed rape crops in UK?

    Now all these things have GM in them.

    The trouble for many in Britain today science is a bad thing and wrong.

    The reality is it is business that takes the science before it is ready and endeavours to make money out of nowhere more so than the world of agri-business such as cargill, bunzel and others. Another place of course is human medicine where our poor old gp's dine out with their 37 hour week and £100,000 salary with the drug companies.

    Why do our GPs earn £100,000 and Italians about £40,000 and heart transpalnt surgeons in Sweden £70,000? That is called market power (see another thread).

    Farming is for us, all.
  • Thu, May 10 2012 17:24 In reply to

    • Malcolm
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Sun, May 22 2005

    Re: GMO Trial

    Anti-GM advocates tell lies too.
    < not for print >
  • Thu, May 10 2012 20:28 In reply to

    • old mcdonald
    • Top 50 Contributor
      Male
    • Joined on Mon, Oct 27 2008
    • Near Castelo Branco, Portugal

    Re: GMO Trial

    motley, I do believe you are like a Vintage Port. Your posts are much more to my liking than when you were a young 56 yo.
    www.oldmcdonaldsolives.com
  • Thu, May 10 2012 23:22 In reply to

    Re: GMO Trial

     This is exactly the same post as you put in the other GM thread Ananda. Do you really have no other input?

    As I see it this is how most single issue groups work. They don't really have allot to say, they just keep repeating it over and over and over and ...

    Your credibility just evaporated!

    "Dogs look up to us, cats look down on us, but pigs treat us as equals." (Sir Winston Churchill)
  • Fri, May 11 2012 1:16 In reply to

    • bovril
    • Top 75 Contributor
      Male
    • Joined on Sat, Mar 14 2009
    • Essex

    Re: GMO Trial

    Ananda is obviously passionate about this subject, claiming to have followed it closely for 10 years. On the other thread is a possibly unique oportunity to engage in a real conversation with a small, family farmer in mid-America who is using GM and non-GM crops in commercial conditions and with several years experience of it and no axe to grind for or against the technology or the companies developing or marketing the seed and chemicals.

    But instead, all Kansas gets is another link posted at him!

    No creditability at all I'm afraid, and it just goes to reinforce my own views which I put at the start of the other thread.
  • Fri, May 11 2012 4:32 In reply to

    Re: GMO Trial

     $45 an acre in the "good old days" before GM??  How many acres of corn and soybeans were you growing then Ananda??  Yeah, I remember those days.  The days when you had about a 3 day window to get things sprayed, and you had to "heat up" your tank mix with stuff like Butyrac that burned both the weeds and the soybeans clear to the ground, sweating it out for two weeks hoping the soybeans would come out of getting "dinged" and the weeds wouldn't, and about half the time they did.  The other half the weeds and soybeans both came out of the herbicide.  Too bad, once the weed got over 4 inches tall, there wasn't much you could do.  Of course, you always had the rotary hoe and cultivator.  Like granddad said, if the soybeans were too small to hoe before lunch, they would be too big after lunch.  So, you hooked up the row crop cultivator, we had 2 183  6 row IHC models with rolling fenders.  Drop the fenders shift the tractor into the lowest gear, and spend day after day driving about 1 mile per hour so you wouldn't roll dirt over the top of the soybean.  You could start out with some of our best pre emerge stuff, like Canopy or Authority, they would usually get 75% of the weeds at least, provided you got good weather.

    In the "good old days" you're talking about, maybe you got 2 weeks of rain and didn't get the crop sprayed, ever try combining a solid mass of weeds?  No problem if you wait until frost, let the whole mess freeze dry, maybe lose 25% or more of the soybean crop to shattering.  That was 25% of a crop that was really half a crop, because you really can't raise a good crop in a mass of weeds.  

    Newsflash the anti GM crowd, we had resistant weeds before GM.  I was dealing with waterhemp that was resistant to just about everything we had to throw at it when RR came out, and saved the day.

    I am still trying to figure out how Monsanto is the bad guy in all of this.  I realize I don't run in very wide circles, but I do know nearly everyone who farms in a 10 mile radius of my farm, and I know of not one single farmer who says Monsanto is making them use their products.  Monsanto developed products that were tested according to the rules my government makes and evidently passed, they filled a need and have been enormously popular.  I will be the very first to admit Monsanto did it to make money, isn't that what most businesses are all about?  I will also admit things aren't as good as they use to be, and the writing on the wall indicates we are just about back to where we started with weed control.  I got 10 years of absolutely amazing weed control, about 3 where it was a little more difficult.  The party may be over, until the next really good new thing comes out, I believe next year.  

    Something tells me Ananda that you wouldn't be too much in favor of a Blazer/Basagran tank mix with a little Butyrac thrown in, maybe with a pre emerge of Treflan for soybeans, and conventional corn with Atrazine and Lexar, with Furadan to get the rootworms.  Send over 50 Brits willing to hoe weeds all day for $25 an acre, and I will ditch Monsanto in a heartbeat.  Remember, our weather is a bit more challenging in July than yours, figure on working all night if you want temps cooler than 75F.  

    My policy on seed and herbicide is if it is legal I am willing to try it.

  • Fri, May 11 2012 4:46 In reply to

    Re: GMO Trial

     I'd also like to say on this thread that I have no illusions about the safety of any chemical we use, no chemical is perfectly safe.  With that in mind, I opt for triple stack corn so I can use no insecticide at all on the corn.  There is nothing wrong with a healthy dose of skepticism regarding large companies and GMOs, too often though the antis have no solid evidence, just a story they read online about someone's brother-in-law who knew a guy who had an uncle who's neighbor across the section had 14 sows abort because they ate GM soybean meal.  There were 22 other farmers in the township who fed the same soybean meal and didn't have sows abort, but we know beyond a shadow of a doubt the 14 that did abort did so because of a pact Monsanto made with Satan.

  • Fri, May 11 2012 4:53 In reply to

    Re: GMO Trial

    I'll throw out one more thing, a little food for thought.  On my triple stack corn I will use no insecticide, no fungicide, a full rate of Lexar and MAYBE a followup of Glyphosate if needed.   What crop is getting more chemicals, a UK conventional wheat crop, or my Kansas GM corn crop?
  • Fri, May 11 2012 17:17 In reply to

    Re: GMO Trial

    Motley

    Its illegal to grow a GM OSR crop in the UK. OSR in the UK is definitely not GM and to claim as much is damaging to the interests of UK farmers.

    Nor has tomato paste for human consumption had any GM content since the GM flavorsaver tomato was withdrawn many years ago.

    And I'd be very careful about making misleading claims about winegum manufacture.

    You must withdraw these inaccurate statements

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