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new business

Last post Wed, Apr 28 2010 23:12 by old mcdonald. 7 replies.
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  • Sun, Apr 25 2010 23:22

    • the tup
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Sun, Apr 25 2010

    new business

    Dear all. l I'd like some of your advice.  I'm 25 and have grown up in farming though my family are not farmers. I'm thinking of setting up a business focusing mainly on foot trimming of sheep but also shearing and  dagging .

    I'd just like to know if you think there is call for this sort of service and where to start.

    Many thanks

  • Mon, Apr 26 2010 12:18 In reply to

    • Peter Wells
    • Top 25 Contributor
      Male
    • Joined on Sun, May 22 2005
    • Gloucestershire
    • Trusted Users

    Re: new business

    This is the sort of business where it is who you know rather than what you know. My guess is that the majority of customers will be low volume flock owners, many of whom would be part time farmers. Your high volume farmers might well appreciate help but are probably geared up to do their own trimming.

    If I am right then your cost structure would have to take account of travel to and from small farms with small flocks making a per head price high. You might mitigate that be offering to give the animal an MOT including worming and dagging if necessary.

    As to getting your name around, Parish Magazine are cheap advertising as is networking in appropriate local organisations. A notice and leaflets in your local farm store can also help.

    All the best

     

  • Mon, Apr 26 2010 19:15 In reply to

    Re: new business

    where are you?

  • Mon, Apr 26 2010 21:35 In reply to

    Re: new business

    the tup:
    where to start

    Start by sitting down and deciding how much money you want to make per day after tax and expenses. This kind of thing is easy to do with tractors - things with small tractors need to earn £100 an hour, and big tractors £150+ an hour to pay the wages, machine etc.

    To be realistic, so your mates who are teachers and so have loads of holiday and do no real work dont "skin" you with better cars / houses etc for your whole life, you want to clear £100 a day in profit after tax and expenses or you may as well go work in Tesco and trim some sheep in your spring break or at weekends.

    Secondly, is there enough work to keep you busy for a year? Trimming, shearing etc is not exactly going to cost you a lot to set up, so can you add other things for sheep people? How about fencing too? Hedge laying? Otherwise you are going to be fairly quiet in wintertime. There is certainly call for the shearing but it isnt enough for a business.

    How to get customers? Ask some vets. They are often at the business end of a sheep, so can spread the word so to speak.

    Not for print please.
  • Tue, Apr 27 2010 0:16 In reply to

    • Jacobus
    • Top 75 Contributor
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    • Joined on Sun, May 22 2005
    • Worcestershire
    • Trusted Users

    Re: new business

    I know someone who is a contract shepherd and who makes a reasonably good living at it.  He has two or three substantial flocks to look after and has a fancy portable race and handling system to cope with those.  These are his bread and butter and take up a good proportion of his time, not only with the usual shepherding tasks but also drawing lambs and getting them to market.  He also looks after some smaller flocks and does shearing for smaller flocks as well as looking after his own sheep.  He has worked with sheep for over 25 years and undoubtedly knows a large number of people in the industry in his area.  His wife works for Countrywide which is quite advantageous in picking up jobs for smaller flocks to fill up his spare time.

  • Tue, Apr 27 2010 7:45 In reply to

    • the tup
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Sun, Apr 25 2010

    Re: new business

    thanks everyone i live in buckingham i would have to attend some college courses to refresh me as ive been out off farming for a few years working as a fencing contractor at the mo all i really want to do is earn my living and future in farming and i thought this may be the best way to start as i havent got the money to invest in tractors and the like.

    but i do have a van and all the smaller tools and items i may need to do this sort of work .

  • Tue, Apr 27 2010 11:41 In reply to

    • mursal
    • Top 50 Contributor
      Male
    • Joined on Wed, Dec 16 2009

    Re: new business

     Unfortunately I can't offer any advice, bur all the very best in your new venture.

  • Wed, Apr 28 2010 23:12 In reply to

    • old mcdonald
    • Top 50 Contributor
      Male
    • Joined on Mon, Oct 27 2008
    • Near Castelo Branco, Portugal

    Re: new business

    the tup, If you are already self-employed as a fencing contractor, then all you are really looking for is another "thread" to your income source. If you are an employee then read the folowing slightly differently, but aim towards it. 

    Why not take any course that you can where you feel you have an interest and some ability. When farming in Australia, mainly wool production, the opportunity arose for me to take a woolclassing course with Australian Wool Board. I ended up knowing a lot more about wool than I ever did keeping sheep. It was one of those odd qualifications it is useful to have at times, and I am extremely proud of it, more so than a fairly lengthy list of academic and "professional" qualifications. There are many others, just see what is available and if you have the time take the course. As a a then qualified person you can begin to look for work that needs the qualification.

    Forget about Tesla Coils' need for £100 a day. You are obviously not the sort of person who is worried about the need to make money just to buy fancy cars, holidays at the Costa Plenty, and gazebos and patios just because other people have them - all a total waste of money given to exactly the same sort of people who buy these things, because they all buy similar items from each other without actually creating anything worthwhile for the rest of humanity. If you can eat and drink and keep a roof over your head doing something you enjoy then you are more fortunate than several billion other people in the world - and you will live a longer happier life.  

    www.oldmcdonaldsolives.com
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