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Re: Schmallenberg (SBV) virus

Started by ohbakasan

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  • #873501

     
    Philip Caseohbakasan
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    Livestock farmers are being urged to be vigilant after a new disease, the Schmallenberg (SBV) virus, was found on four sheep farms in eastern England. Although the disease is not notifiable, DEFRA says it wants farmers to report all suspicious cases. The disease, first discovered in Germany, has been linked to miscarriages and still births in sheep, cattle and goats. Symptoms include fever, reduced milk yield, loss of appetite and body condition, and in some cases diarrhoea, with symptoms disappearing after a few days.

    DEFRA says the true extent of Schmallenberg is unknown. Like Bluetongue, the disease is transmitted by midges. But scientists believe that the threat from SBV to human health is very low. However, are you worried about this disease and do you have concerns that your stock may have been affected?

    #873502

     
    Peter WellsPeter Wells
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     We had the vet out to a problem ewe and the lambs looked like this but:  The ewe had prolapsed and frankly, dead lambs often look like this and in our case the ewe exhibted no symptons of anything until immediately prior to aborting.

     

    Photograph of a lamb affected by arthrogryposis (persistent flexion of the joints) arthrogryposis is one of the congenital abnormalities associated with SBV infection. Image courtesy AHVLA.

  • #873503

     
    perry6420
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     So would it be similar to ezootic a toxoplasma

    #873504

     
    baa-lamb
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    I’m sure every farmer would be worried, from what i have read the midges/mosquitoes don’t emerge until around may,(when most stock was apparently effected last year) i’m guessing a good dose of fly treatment put onto stock well in advance of this and kept up with surely can only help? for any risk’s this year, and maybe some garlic buckets?, Although all fly treatments we tried on our cattle last year were having no repel effect, a bit like putting water on!, with lambing starting for us in 3 weeks, and them grazing water meadows, well liked by midges, fly’s etc, gulp!, time can only tell,
    dare i say it let us hope it ends up like blue tongue and goes away fairly quickly. without to much damage.

    #873505

     
    Isabel DaviesIsabel Davies
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    I’ve had a very interesting email from a farmer in Belgium who is warning that some producers are losing 20-30% of lambs to this and the number of confirmed cases is going to rise dramatically as it takes several days to go from suspect to confirmed. Will try and see if we can get more from our European colleagues to help increase understanding.  http://www.fwi.co.uk/Articles/2012/01/27/131192/belgian-farmers-own-account-of-schmallenberg.html

     

    #873506

     
    AHVLAGIRL
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    So far we have only seen the tip of the iceberg in this country. Once people start lambing and calving there will be many more cases. The key question at present, which we cannot answer is whether the virus has survived the winter in sheep and cattle. Midges are unlikely to survive and be infectious. If cattle and sheep are harbouring the virus, or if their offspring are carrying it, when the midge season arrives in april or may this disease will quickly spread across the country. In East Anglia they are starting to see problems, with reports that up to 70% of sheep farmers that have started lambing already have seen deformed lambs. In some cases this is only 2% of the lamb crop, in others up to 25%. Numbers of confirmed cases are rising very quickly on the continent. This is likely to happen here. On the continent they are seeing this as a disease mainly of sheep but I think that is only because people are lambing but not many are calving yet. It would be really good if cattle are not as susceptible to the disease as sheep, but there is little reason to believe this, we will only know when East Anglian farmers start calving.

    #873507

     
    Isabel DaviesIsabel Davies
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    Confirmation that the number of cases is now at 11. All in sheep.so far.

     

     

    #873510

     
    xdrfox
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    midges here also, please read this,

    90 percent + white-tailed deer populations dead, Northern Plains

    To Mass Animal Death on Monday, January 09, 2012

    http://members.beforeitsnews.com/story/1599/838/90_percent_white-tailed_deer_populations_dead,_Northern_Plains

    is there any chance this may be radiation fallout ?  The jet stream from Japan is going over your heads falling in your fields !

     radiation fallout from Japan, it’s worse them reported ! If it isn’t fallout, you should still be mindful and do some simple testing !

    .html

    http://enenews.com/

    Peace !

    #873508

     
    field diarist
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     This season’s lambing in Shelfanger flock: Dec. 3rd abortion, Dec. 26th abortion, Jan. 29th twins, one normal and the other very deformed limbs and born with rigour-mortis, Jan. 31st twins 1st born dead but normal, the 2nd born badly deformed with rigour-mortis. The example of deformity in the AHVLA is not as extreme as the ones in my lambs.

    #873509

     
    Tim RelfTim.Relf
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    #873511

     
    baa-lamb
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    Xdrfox, it is something i thought about too, i looked about on the net to try and find which way the winds were blowing around the time of march April when the plant leaked. And also in may (i had read in another article that this is when they reckon the midges were starting to emerge)- but didn’t get very far, one thing i did find was that some rabbits were found born NR by it with no ears,
    although if they did somehow pick up radiation and fly off infecting stock surely japan would be suffering this more?

    #873512

     
    welshnwillingwelshnwilling
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    Quick question, hope someone out there can answer it. Let’s say that the worst happens and your flock gets affected by the disease. Will the ewes have built up any resistance before next years breeding season ?

    #873513

     
    townietownie
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    welshnwilling

    Quick question, hope someone out there can answer it. Let’s say that the worst happens and your flock gets affected by the disease. Will the ewes have built up any resistance before next years breeding season ?

    From what I’ve been reading, the answer to this is no-one knows.  They aren’t even certain what the pathogen is, just that its a virus of some kind that appears to be midge-bourne.  Any further info on the diesase and it’s progress will only come with time.

     

    #873514

     
    Tim RelfTim.Relf
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    #873515

     
    henararhenarar
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    I think this could be bad

    As for these fly treatments to keep the midjes of I dont think they work anyway

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