We have all been there – scrolling down a Twitter page on farming that features a host of funny and topical updates and thinking something doesn’t seem quite right.

Maybe it’s an unusual hashtag used by former NFU president Meurig Raymond, a heavily photoshopped profile picture, or an expletive-heavy parliamentary update from Defra secretary Michael Gove.

See also: How to make the most of social media to promote farming

Then when you scroll back up to check the details again you spot it: “parody account”, “spoof” or “views NOT of environment minister”.

These accounts are always comic, but have been known to cause confusion, so while you make sure you’re following who you think you’re following on Twitter, we’ve made a list of the funniest parody accounts to look out for.

1. @meurigraymond

When the real Meurig Raymond joined Twitter in February, he had to settle for @meurigraym because this imposter had already snapped his full name up.

This account boasts the founding of of #RedWineTime and #MilkMonday, and is a big fan of Buzzword Bingo during any important speeches.

It also still takes the time to share messages of support for British food and farmers and raise awareness for health and safety campaigns.

Though keeping fairly quiet since Mr Raymond joined social media, it’s still well worth a look.

2. @toddhoffmanfrmr

One from across the pond, this user focuses on “making grain and recording songs” in Oregon, US.

If you are looking for cultivation jokes, arable puns and healthy use of the hashtag #frick, this is the place for you.

Expensive machinery on fire/in swamp/post-collision accompanied by wry commentary is par for the course here. 

3. @Gove2018

A slightly sporadic, but always enthusiastic, representation of Michael Gove MP from the future.

Since 2018 rolled around, this account has been silent as events have caught up with the tweeter from the future, leaving the updates to actual @michaelgove.

Mainly concerned with making sure the wasps don’t take over and guiding Mr Gove towards becoming prime minister, this account may be unusual, but it has attracted nearly 1,000 followers.

4. @Owen_Paterson

Former Defra secretary Owen Paterson’s Twitter handle @OwenPaterson is only one underscore away from this parody account.

It describes the North Shropshire MP as doing his best to become the “most hated politician” and his location as “in hiding”.

The tweets are limited in number, but topics range from fracking to sugar cubes to “getting mortal at the Fox and Hound” with David Cameron and George Osborne. 

5. @subsidyjunkieuk

This so-called John Dear account is apparently addicted to spending farm subsidies on holidays, champagne, shooting and private school fees.

Working only 39 days a year means this Twitter user can spend the majority of his time totting up mistresses, bowling around in Bentleys and tweeting from his holiday home in Barbados.

If you were wondering what the biggest problem facing farmers currently is, it’s in black and white on this account’s feed: jetlag.

6. @squattingfarmer

The Squatting Farmer account celebrates all instances of media photos featuring cheerful members of the agriculture sector – you guessed it – squatting.

That may sound like a niche interest, but it has been going strong for two years now.

Make sure to send them your “squaggestions”.

7. @TripeUK

Europe’s most radical meat-based marketing board, the Tripe Marketing Board, is keen to talk tripe with you.

Check out this account to enjoy make-up tips for livestock (cows are much better looking with lipstick and eyeliner, apparently) or new baking recipes (spoiler alert: they include tripe).

Someone must be doing something right, because Tripe UK currently has 13,000 followers – get involved before World Tripe Day rolls around again.

8. @BuyBritishMilk

The British Milk Council, an “official” authority, uses this account to promote the drinking of milk, a cause we can all support.

It attracted thousands of followers after a heated Twitter argument between “Jason” and “Donna” over redundancy and a password was shared widely on the internet.

Since then it has grown in popularity and now shares witty anecdotes, milk spillage traffic alerts, supermarket v dairy farmer graphics, and much, much more.


Is this list missing your favourite? If you know of any more farming or countryside parody accounts which you think deserve a mention, send them in to lauren.harris@reedbusiness.com