A five-year project to mitigate the impact of climate change will have the potential to store two years of carbon emissions from UK agriculture.


The Dartmoor Mires project will restore internationally-important blanket bogs across 120ha of Devon moorland, increasing their potential to improve water quality and store carbon.

Launched by Natural England chairman Poul Christense, the project is being led by Dartmoor National Park Authority. Farmers, commoners and conservationists are also involved.

Suzanne Goodfellow, the national park’s director of conservation, said the project had the potential to store two years worth of carbon emissions from UK agriculture.

South West Water is funding the project under a strategy to reduce water treatment costs while protecting the environment. It is spending £9.1m over five years to manage water quality before it reaches reservoirs and treatment plants.

A similar project on Exmoor was praised by some graziers for improving grassland, although other farmers complained that it reduced the long-term quality of agricultural land with inadequate compensation.