I HAD the best rugby match last week. It was a home game against Exeter University who we’ve beaten once at home and lost to once away.They’re a very nippy team who like to “hug” you around the neck while the ref isn’t looking. (Mind you, we returned the gesture on a few occasions.)

The match didn”t start well for our players, an ambulance was called for Plymouth in the first 20 minutes for a suspected broken leg, so after a quick pause the game resumed with our team showing even more resolve.

Both Exeter and us needed a victory to win the league and have a chance of being moved up next season, and, having slaughtered Southampton 87-0 last week, we felt unstoppable.

Our team scored three tries and converted once, which gave us a 17-0 lead, so I was subbed half way through the second half when I could do no damage to the final score!

I only played for the last quarter of an hour or so, but that was long enough for me to get some tackles in and do a bit of damage – to myself more than anyone, but it was worth it.

I seemed to end up at the bottom of a pile more often than not, even though I was put on the normally action-free blind wing, and we stopped the blighters getting through to score any points.

At full time, we”d won 17-0 and with it the league. Exeter played really well, but we pulled out all the stops – and for all the girls in their third and final year of university it was a fantastic way to end their time. We had a massive group hug after. I wish I”d played more games this season; I had so much fun out there!

Unfortunately, I couldn”t go to the social afterwards because I had a genetic assignment to do. Typical. But I”ve heard the celebrations were pretty good. I ache now, I have a few nice souvenir bruises and a headache, as has everyone else – but at least we won.

As for the rest of uni, not much else is happening. We are doing some experiments on the seed rate of maize in relation to its overall yield and various things to do with clover and ryegrass.

So far, we”ve been preparing the experiments, which means cutting plants up – a nice way to relax on a Thursday morning that means I don”t have to use any of the brain cells I killed off the night (or game) before.

In other lectures, we are learning about fish – a very useful subject, very relevant, very interesting (not!) and if I have to learn about another one of the little blighters I”m going to scream!

I have a lecture titled “ecological adaptations” all about fish – quite what the point of that is, I”m yet to see. To be honest, I”d rather be playing rugby (or learning about livestock) than learning about flipping fish…