Winds of up to 90mph and heavy rain are forecast to hit parts of England and Wales on Monday (28 October).

The Met Office said there is a risk a significant storm could develop close to the UK on Sunday night going into Monday morning.

The storm is likely to develop on exposed coasts in the south and make its way towards the North East.

Forecasters are warning that storm-force winds could bring down trees or cause structural damage to farm buildings with disruption to transport and power supplies.

The Met Office has issued a yellow warning for “persistent” heavy rain, with the added risk of surface flooding to farm fields putting livestock at risk.

Its chief forecaster Eddie Carroll said: “The storm is likely to intensify rapidly just west of the UK late on Sunday before tracking across England and Wales early on Monday.

“People should be aware there is a risk of severe weather and significant disruption. They should keep up to date with and act on the advice in our forecasts and warnings as the situation develops.

“This storm is more unusual, developing much closer to the UK and potentially tracking across the country while still in its most powerful phase.”

Rural insurer NFU Mutual has issued some tips to help farmers deal with storm damage:

  • Personal safety comes first – only carry out an assessment of your home or farm buildings if it’s safe to do so
  • Don’t use any electrical items that have been affected by water
  • When possible take photographs of the damage
  • If emergency repairs are necessary, make sure they are undertaken straight away, and ensure that the property is secured as soon as possible. Keep all estimates and receipts
  • If you are in need of urgent help please ring your local NFU Mutual agent
  • An NFU Mutual spokesman advised policyholders who suffer damage to get emergency repairs carried out straight away, and to contact their local NFU Mutual office or its helpline for advice – and to get their insurance claims under way

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