A lost village which has remained uninhabited since farmers were evicted during the Second World War opened to the public over the Easter weekend.

Farming families and rural residents were given just six weeks to leave the Wiltshire village of Imber on Salisbury Plain in 1943.

They never returned.

The abandoned village was used to train soldiers as they prepared for D-Day and the invasion of Europe in 1944.

It been used by the military for training purposes ever since.

Imber remains in MoD possession and out of bounds to the general public, but the village opens its gates to visitors for a few days each year.

Imber village "unexploded debris" sign

Unexploded ammunition in the surrounding countryside means visitors to Imber are warned they should keep to paths and roadways.

A view of Imber village from the road

There were five farms in the village at the time of the evacuation in 1943. Today there are none.

The former farmhouse at Seagrams Farm

The former farmhouse at Seagrams Farm was built in 1880 – but no one has lived here for more than 70 years.

The building believed to the former Nags Head public house

This building – believed to the former Nags Head public house – makes a backdrop for a photo.

A general view of Imber village

Hundreds of visitors flocked to the village when it opened to the public during Easter weekend.

Imber church is a Grade I listed building.

The church is a Grade I listed building – protected status that means it is the only building in Imber out of bounds to the military.

A display inside the church highlights Imber's history

A display inside the church highlights Imber’s history – and how residents were evicted from the village.

Details of the moving docket of local livestock transporter Arthur Stokes who hired out his lorry to move some of the villagers' furniture.

Local livestock transporter Arthur Stokes hired out his lorry to move some of the villagers’ furniture.

children hunt for Easter eggs in the churchyard

With no worshippers anymore on a Sunday, children hunt for Easter eggs in the churchyard.

A modern house, built for use by the army for urban warfare training

Modern houses have been built in part of the village, so the army can use them for urban warfare training.

Imber Court manor house, shuttered and locked

Imber Court manor house remains shuttered and locked.

Corrugated steel roofing has been used to protect older buildings

Roofs on many older buildings have been replaced with corrugated steel…

Original beams of the thatched barn roof are still in good repair under the corrugated steel roof

…But from inside it is still possible to see the original roofing material underneath – such as the thatch on this old barn.

The livestock shed at Imber Court Farm

This livestock shed at Imber Court Farm hasn’t seen any livestock for years.

Detail of the brick feeding trough at Imber Court Farm

The brick feeding trough at Imber Court Farm remains as it was left more than 70 years ago.