More than 1000 livestock farmers across north Wales are without a fallen stock service after trading standards officers closed a storage plant near Wrexham.

But the operator of the plant has said he is confident the service will be reinstated next week.

The collection centre at Marchwiel, operated by Clutton Agricultural, was closed by Wrexham trading standards last Thursday (25 May) after the owner of a neighbouring premises complained about the smell.

On inspection, trading standards officers were confronted with six weeks’ backlog of deadstock.

The suspension of a fallen stock service in north Wales will frustrate farmers in the region after problems last year finding a collector to serve the area.

National Fallen Stock Company board chairman Michael Seals has written to the 1100 affected farmers informing them of the situation but, he said, there was nothing else the company could do other than suggest they speak to their local animal health office.

“It is very disappointing this has happened.

Having resolved the collection issue last year, we now have a disposal issue,” added Mr Seals.

Speaking to Farmers Weekly, Sam Clutton of Clutton Agricultural said he was hopeful of having the backlog cleared by the early part of next week.

“I’m in daily contact with trading standards and it is fully aware of the progress we are making,” he said.

But the situation in north Wales has prompted farmers’ leaders in the principality to call for a contingency plan that would permit affected farmers to bury fallen stock.

Dai Davies, NFU Cymru president, described the situation as totally unacceptable.

“With many schools on half-term it is inevitable that north Wales will be a honeypot for tourists, many of whom will stay on-farm,” he said.

“It is a disgrace that nothing tangible is being done by the authorities to immediately address the problem.”

Farmers Union of Wales president Gareth Vaughan added:

“I have written to Carwyn Jones asking him to give urgent consideration to allowing these farmers to bury their fallen stock on farm because there have been no assurances that this situation will be resolved soon.”