The death toll for stock killed during the freezing winter and early spring weather has hit 100,000 and is still rising, the National Fallen Stock Company (NFSCo) has said.

The NFSCo figures show 64,000 more animals died on farms in England, Scotland and Wales between January and April 2013 compared with the same period 12 months ago. It is a rise in deaths of more than 24%.

In addition to this, Northern Ireland recorded stock losses of 29,000 in the blizzards at the end of March. A further 8,000 animals died on the Isle of Man, taking the toll to 101,000 animals over the four-month period.

A statement released by NFSCo pointed out that the figures excluded animals collected privately and those categorised as “special services” by collectors.

Special service operations are carried out by collectors where losses are more numerous than normal, the NFSCo statement said.

“Consequently the figures here will be a minimum, and will increase as new data is received,” it warned.

The toll

  • English, Scottish and Welsh sheep losses in April were 50% higher than April 2012 costing 35,000 extra lives
  • Welsh cattle losses in April were more than double 2012’s equivalent to almost 2,700 head
  • Cattle losses in England and Scotland in April were about a quarter more than 2012 (23% and 25% to 13,800 and 9,700 head respectively)
  • Cattle losses for England, Scotland and Wales were up 34% and more than 7,000.

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