A dog ferrets a bone from putrid animal food waste:

One of many sickening scenes depicted on a video filmed by Northumberland Trading Standards on Bobby Waugh”s Burnside Farm four weeks after a government vet renewed his swill feeding licence in 2001.

Does this image hold tantalising clues about the origins of foot-and-mouth? Could it unlock the secret history of the disease that cost the UK economy more than 8bn and stole the lives of millions of animals in the contiguous cull and caused their owners so much heartache?

The answers are important. Those who suffered deserve explanations. Moreover, as FW investigations have revealed, the answers could prove DEFRA’s theory about how foot-and-mouth spread is fatally flawed. If that”s true, its strategy for tackling future outbreaks must also be flawed.

The bone pictured is from a sheep. Could it be the vital vector that brought the disease on to Burnside Farm and if so from where? Could it be the source of infection for following outbreaks?

Government scientists would like us to believe that after the initial alleged infection on Mr Waugh”s farm, the F&M virus spread in the air four miles north, against the prevailing wind, to infect other farms. But, as at least one leading scientist pointed out in the spring of 2001, the F&M virus concerned, Pan Asia Type 0, is capable of spreading only 200m by air.

Did the government ignore that vital fact because it failed to fit its convenient, but wrong, theory about the spread of F&M?

Leading scientists who have seen the video and examined the evidence now raise serious doubt about the official explanation. The government has an obligation to respond with candour, clarity and truth.