A new flagship leads the Suzuki KingQuad range. The KingQuad 750, launched this summer – which is the firm’s 25th anniversary of producing the world’s first quadricycle – represents its largest capacity quad. It is joined by the KingQuad 400, a model pitched squarely at the farming market.

The liquid-cooled DOHC fuel-injected engine on the 750 boasts 722cc displacement, while the twin-speed high and low with reverse transmission is provided by the company’s QuadMatic CVT system with centrifugal clutch.

Minimum ride vibration, due to the engine being mounted on hydrostatic bushes makes for a smooth ride, even at speed.

New Suzuki models

Model

Fuel

Size (cc/hp)

Transmission

Price

         

LT-A400F K8 KingQuad

Petrol

376cc

CVT, h/l ranges, selectable four-wheel drive

£4799 +VAT

LT-F400F K8 KingQuad

Petrol

376cc

Semi-automatic 5-speed, h/l ranges, selectable four wheel drive

£4799 + VAT

LT-A750X K8 KingQuad

Petrol

722cc

QuadMatic CVT, h/l ranges, selectable four-wheel drive

£5990 + VAT

And, says Suzuki, it shouldn’t mater if you’re at the top of Snowdonia, as the fuel injection system automatically adjusts for altitude and temperature, doing away with the need for a choke.

A torque-sensing limited-slip differential, branded Suzuki Sure-Track, means even the toughest terrain can be tackled with ease, claim the company. And, true enough, it seemed to cope well with a varied terrain on test day.

The gate-type shift lever is smooth, none of the clunkiness you sometimes get here, and the ability to start in gear is handy.

Useful additions, like a button to boost power in difficult conditions (located handily on the handlebars. But watch out – it’s located where the starter button usually is) and a watertight cubby hole – also confusing as it look like another fuel tank – make the 750 a pretty strong contender for the top-end market, particularly as it’s priced at £5999 + VAT.

Its smaller sibling, the KingQuad 400, is available in semi-automatic five-speed transmission or fully automatic CVT, both options coming with high and low ranges and selectable four-wheel drive. Dual-shock absorber swing arm rear suspension coupled with a new T-shaped seat makes it a comfortable, fun ride.

Also using the gate-type range lever, the 376cc quad is shorter than its 450 counterpart and lacks little of its bigger brother’s ability to cope with tough, muddy terrain. All this, and green or red paint for no extra cost, for £4799 + VAT.