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40,000 farmers bring Dublin to a standstill

29 October 1998
40,000 farmers bring Dublin to a standstill

By FWi staff

AN estimated 40,000 farmers marched through Dublin city centre yesterday (Wednesday) in the biggest farm protest for more than 30 years.

The protest, supported by organisations across rural Ireland, brought the Irish capital to a standstill for more than six hours.

“Farmers are angry, frustrated and desperate,” said Raymond OMalley, spokesman for the Irish Farmers Association, which organised the protest.

The farmers warned of further demonstrations unless the Irish Government delivered a £60 million emergency aid package for the farming sector.

“The response to this protest has been phenomenal,” said Mr OMalley.

“Everyone connected with agriculture wanted to come to Dublin to let the Government, and Brussels, know just how bad things are.”

The farmers claim that 50,000 Irish jobs are at risk from the current crisis in agriculture.

But not everyone was impressed by the demonstration. Dublin traders and shop-keepers said the march had cost them £3m in lost business.

  • Mass farm protest expected in Dublin, FWi, 27 October, 1998

    • Read more on:
    • News

    40,000 farmers bring Dublin to a standstill

    29 October 1998
    40,000 farmers bring Dublin to a standstill

    By FWi staff

    AN estimated 40,000 farmers marched through Dublin city centre yesterday (Wednesday) in the biggest farm protest for more than 30 years.

    The protest, supported by organisations across rural Ireland, brought the Irish capital to a standstill for more than six hours.

    “Farmers are angry, frustrated and desperate,” said Raymond OMalley, spokesman for the Irish Farmers Association, which organised the protest.

    The farmers warned of further demonstrations unless the Irish Government delivered a £60 million emergency aid package for the farming sector.

    “The response to this protest has been phenomenal,” said Mr OMalley.

    “Everyone connected with agriculture wanted to come to Dublin to let the Government, and Brussels, know just how bad things are.”

    The farmers claim that 50,000 Irish jobs are at risk from the current crisis in agriculture.

    But not everyone was impressed by the demonstration. Dublin traders and shop-keepers said the march had cost them £3m in lost business.

      Read more on:
    • News
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