and beyond - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £133
Saving £46
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

and beyond

26 September 1997

1998

and beyond

UK AGRICULTURE is going through one of the toughest spells for many years.

Everywhere you look, prices are falling and the loss of income to the industry as a whole is put in the billions of £, rather than the millions.

But what does the future hold for those who pull through?

In the sixth of the series, this years 1998 and Beyond conference, (organised by Midland Bank, Deloitte and Touche and farmers weekly) will draw on the Canadian experience to seek some of the answers.

Top Canadian civil servant, Mike Gifford, will outline the changes to farm support across the Atlantic. He will consider the key issues at stake in the run up to new world trade talks and the lessons for Europe from what his country has already done.

Speakers for accountants Deloitte and Touche will then look at the current state of UK agriculture and set out some of the targets for future prosperity.

With the next round of CAP reform just beginning, these are likely to be moving targets. Midland Bank agriculture director, Norman Coward will consider the future shape of farm support and the influence of sterling on farmings fortunes.

Finally, local farmers Paul Hayward, Tim Brown and Martin Jenkins will provide a practical overview of how they see the future and what they are doing with their businesses to prepare for it.

&#8226 Each conference, which costs just £25 including VAT, will include tea and a hot buffet supper.

Chairman Norman Coward, agriculture director with Midland Bank, will look into his crystal ball at this autumns Outlook conference.

1998 and beyond

Tuesday, November 4: The Great Yorkshire Showground, Harrogate. 4.00pm to 7.00pm, in association with the Yorkshire Agricultural Society.

Wednesday, November 5: Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester. 4.00pm to 7.00pm, in association with Arable Research Centres.

Thursday, November 6: East of England Showground, Peterborough. 4.00pm to 7.00pm, in association with the East of England Agricultural Society.

Conference agenda

4.00Tea.

4.30Chairmans welcome: Norman Coward.

4.35Canadian messages for the UK. Lessons for Europe from north America: Mike Gifford.

5.20How profitable is British agriculture? Surviving the drop in farm incomes: Vincent Hedley Lewis (Harrogate and Peterborough) Mark Hill (Cirencester).

6.00What does the future hold? Global markets and currency considerations: Norman Coward.

6.40The Hayward View: Paul Hayward (Harrogate).

The Brown View: Tim Brown (Cirencester).

The Jenkins View: Martin Jenkins (Peterborough).

7.00Buffet supper.

Tim Brown – is a first generation farmer running 2428ha (6000 acres) in Gloucestershire and Oxfordshire on a tenanted and contract farming basis, including a 250-head suckler beef herd. He has a keen interest in eastern Europe, and is chief executive of a large Hungarian farming enterprise.

Norman Coward (chairman) – is current agriculture director with Midland Bank and, as such, a familiar face at many shows and conferences. Before joining Midland he set up and managed the old Milk Marketing Boards farm advisory service. He is visiting professor in Agriculture and Business Management at Wye College, University of London.

Mike Gifford – was born in the UK but moved to Canada in his teens. He joined the Canadian government in 1966 working on trade policy, becoming the main Canadian negotiator at the GATT talks. Currently director general of Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (similar to MAFF) he will also lead the Canadian team in the impending World Trade Organisation talks in Geneva.

Paul Hayward – is a partner in a 290ha (717-acre) LEAF demonstration farm at Bishop Burton in the Yorkshire Wolds. Running a mixed farm, he sells his milk to MD Foods and grows a variety of seed and feed crops, plus vining peas. Mr Hayward is also a Nuffield scholar.

Vincent Hedley Lewis – leads the Deloitte and Touche Agriculture team, advising all manner of farm-related businesses. He specialises in farm business restructuring and also farms 688ha (1700 acres) of arable crops in Lincolnshire.

Mark Hill – is the partner in charge of Deloitte and Touche Agriculture in the south-west. A graduate of Reading University, he has over 10 years experience of advising farmers on finance, taxation and succession issues.

Martin Jenkins – farms almost 500ha (1240 acres) in Lincolnshire, including most combinable crops and a 6000-head turkey unit. He is also managing director of Childerley Estates in Cambridgeshire, chairman of the Lincolnshire NFU and vice-chairman for the Arable Research Centres.

    Read more on:
  • News

and beyond

20 September 1996

and beyond

AFTER five years of autumn Outlook conferences, we should be getting pretty good at predicting the future.

But such is the nature of our industry, the ever-changing political and economic climate make the next few years even more uncertain than the ones just gone.

Since last year, the USA – so dominant in world trade – has passed a new Farm Bill, signalling a swing away from production and export subsidies and a major push for new markets in order to secure farm incomes. How far will the EU have to follow suit in order to compete?

Brussels also continues to cloud the outlook as it juggles its policies in an attempt to comply with the last GATT agreement and prepare for the next one. Can it fulfill its multiple objectives, while maintaining public support for its costly policies?

Closer to home, the spectre of BSE continues to haunt the livestock industry, and could soon rub off on arable farmers if ministers agree to cuts in area aid next year. A change of government is also a distinct possibility for 1997. Does new Labour really mean new danger, or can UK farming thrive under a Labour government as it has in the past?

These are just some of the issues that the speakers will be seeking to find answers to.

&#8226 Following the success of previous years events, we are now adding a third date to give farmers in the north of England a chance to get involved. The programme, organised by Midland Bank, Deloitte & Touche and farmers weekly, is shown right.

&#8226 Each conference, which costs a mere £25 including VAT, will include tea and a hot buffet supper, giving delegates every opportunity to chat to the speakers, and to each other.


1997 and beyond

Tuesday, October 29: The Great Yorkshire Showground, Harrogate. 4.00pm to 7.00pm, in association with the Yorkshire Agricultural Society.

Wednesday, October 30: Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester. 4.00pm to 7.00pm, in association with Arable Research Centres.

Thursday, October 31: East of England Showground, Peterborough. 4.00pm to 7.00pm, in association with the East of England Agricultural Society.


CONFERENCE BOOKING FORM

I/We should like to attend the "1997 and beyond" conference on:

&#42 Tue, Oct 29 at the Great Yorkshire Showground, Harrogate

&#42 Wed, Oct 30 at the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester

&#42 Thur, Oct 31 at the East of England Showground, Peterborough.

(Please tick appropriate box)

Name(s)

Address.

PostcodeTelephone

I enclose a cheque (made payable to Deloitte & Touche)

for the sum of(£25 a delegate, inclusive of VAT)

Please return to Claire Cullingford, Deloitte & Touche, Leda House, Station Road, Cambridge, CB1 2RN.


Conference agenda

4.00 Tea

4.30 Chairmans welcome: Norman Coward

4.40 An agricultural bonanza in the US? The US Farm Bill and what it means for UK farmers: Dean Kleckner

5.20 Boosting British food and drink exports: Patrick Davis

6.00 The 1996 harvest – facts, figures and forecasts: VincentHedley Lewis (Harrogate and Peterborough); MarkHill (Cirencester)

6.40 "The Bosomworth View": Robin Bosomworth (Harrogate) "The Turney View": Paul Turney (Cirencester) "The Turney View": Bill Turney (Peterborough)

7.00 Hot buffet supper

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus