Archive Article: 1995/07/14 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

This Dalbo cultivator, imported from Denmark by Lawrence Edwards, is designed for post-harvest stubble and straw incorporation. Available in working widths from 3-4.7m (9ft 10in-15ft 5in), the cultivator comprises an initial bank of auto-reset winged tines followed by a set of angled discs which incorporate and bury the trash. A rear-mounted crumbler roller consolidates and maintains working depth. Prices range from £5595 for the 3m wide model to £12,255 for the hydraulically folding flagship.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

Sandy Wright of ANM (at computer) with Jim Watson (left) and Mike Carter of Midland Marts endure a lacklustre trade at AgVisions electronic milk quota auction at last weeks Royal Show.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

Let the combines roll! Pastoral winter barley comes off the field at Blois Farms, Westleton, Suffolk, on Monday at 16.5%. It was sold "off the combine" to a local farmer for home mixing. In total 30ha were cleared before a power cut on Tuesday brought proceedings to a temporary halt, explained the owner, Sir Charles Blois.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

Prospective purchasers were in a cautious mood when St Helena Farms long-established Jersey herd was dispersed on Saturday. The BSE-free status of the herd gave confidence to buyers, say the auctioneers, but the lack of rain in the south-east kept a lid on trade. Top call was £485 for a third calf cow due at the end of July to a Belgian Blue. Recently calved, or close to calving cows, averaged £304. Machinery met a firm demand, however(South East Marts).

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

Second-cut silage yielded well at Walton Hall in mid-June, although prospects of getting a third cut have receded.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

Touche Ross is a leading national and international firm of chartered accountants and management consultants with offices across the UK and represented in more than 100 countries. It has a team of specialists providing advice to the farming community.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

The annual sale of the Hampshire Down Sheep Breeders Association saw 43 head offered on the last day of the Royal Show.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

Valuable lessons should have been learned at the Scottish NFUs council meeting in Edinburgh.

First, there is huge support for the unions move to establish a public affairs and communications division. Second, bringing in a top outside speaker was a big success and should be repeated. Third, the union should keep its nose out of issues which do not concern it.

The paper presented by chief executive Tom Brady on public relations was a credit to him and demanded admission that external communications needed to be improved and that internal communications were not working.

The proposed new division will have a director and one assistant. There will be direct links with the impossibly named and grossly underfunded Farm and Countryside Educational Trust.

At last the union realises that a professional approach is needed in relationships with youngsters, the public and its own members.

But even the excellence of Mr Bradys paper could not have prepared him for the rush of delegates demanding to speak on the issue or the fact that everyone backed his ideas.

President John Ross had already waved a £10 note about and suggested a similar contribution from every member would raise about £150,000 to fund the PR effort.

Scottish farmers should be clear that £150,000 will pay the salary and expenses of a communications director and assistant, but no more. There is no money here for film production and advertising.

One delegate called for a pan-industry approach to PR funding, an idea worth pursuing. Better to have a large say in a PR spend of £1.5m than total control over £150,000.

There was no slower uptake of the chance to question top EU Commission official David Roberts. He had given a candid and broad view of the future of farm support.

He mentioned a new acronym – PECOs – Euro-jargon for eastern European countries wishing to join the EU. He thought their membership was inevitable but the cost would be at the lower end of a 10bn to 40bn ECU range.

Mr Roberts covered a lot of ground, answered a lot of questions and stimulated a level of debate that has been missing for too long at these council meetings.

The ugliest debate was about the Scottish Pride Shareholders Action Group. Its members, including NFU milk committee men, have tabled various resolutions for the Scottish Pride annual meeting.

The union got involved, publicly supported Scottish Pride and called a meeting of both sides, which the shareholders boycotted.

The union case was that if the resolutions were debated and carried, great harm would be done to a vital part of the Scottish milk industry. Scottish Pride wants to be a truly independent and commercial company. Its leaders should be capable of answering any producer worries without interference from the NFU.

There are times when it is best for the union to keep to the north of an issue which does not concern it. This was such an issue.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/14

14 July 1995

More power, stronger axles and uprated hydraulics feature on the latest big four-wheel-drives from Case.

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