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Archive Article: 1995/07/21

21 July 1995

Buyers from 10 abattoirs kept trade firm for the 600-plus pigs sold at Wickham market, Suffolk, on Monday. But prices, in the 93p to 96p/kg range, were slightly down on the previous week. If sterling stays weak and European pig numbers do not dramatically rise, producers are facing a good autumn, says auctioneer Peter Crichton. (Lacy Scott.)

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Archive Article: 1995/07/21

21 July 1995

Maris Huntsman winter wheat destined for thatching is cut and bound at Knole, Langport, Somerset earlier this week. Grown by Peter Chapman, the crop was bought by Richard Wright of thatching contractors, R. J. Wright (inset). Across the country, meanwhile, hay and straw is in fierce demand as dry weather and fears of a shortage encourage buying. Auctioneers Stags, for example, have sold over 1200ha (2965 acres) of standing straw in the West Country this year, with prices £10 to £15 above 1994 levels. Winter barley has averaged £22/acre; winter wheat £18/acre; and spring barley £17/acre. And everywhere, buoyant prices are prompting growers to consider alternatives to merely chopping straw.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/21

21 July 1995

Seven days of almost continuous blight conditions have resulted in widespread full or half Smith periods. With crops now moving from top growth to bulking product choice and timing need careful consideration. Adopt high risk intervals for systemic and contact materials alike, urges Ciba.

Blight has been confirmed on a dump in Yorkshire. Crop outbreaks are reported from Lancashire, Norfolk, Suffolk, Cornwall and ADAS Trawscoed.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/21

21 July 1995

COMBINES will be flat-out harvesting barley and rape by the weekend – weather permitting.

First impressions suggest yields will not be exciting but fears of a drought-induced disaster may be unfounded.

Samples seen by Norfolk-based grain merchant BDR Agriculture of Bressingham, Diss, suggest an acceptable harvest.

In Suffolk, Peter Brown of Flempton, near Bury St Edmunds, finished Puffin last week. "We started about the same time as last year and, despite lack of rain, the yield has held up. Ninety acres did 2.5t/acre, the rest 2.2t to match 1994. I hope to be into Chariot spring barley at the weekend."

Wheat looks "exceptionally well", with good grain fill and yield expected to top last years 8t/ha (3.2t/acre).

Norfolk barometer grower, Robin Baines, planned to start Puffin at Wroxham Hall Farms, near Norwich, on Monday but was delayed by rain. "It is fit, standing well and looks good for 2 to 2.25t/acre," he says. "I have rubbed out some ears and the sample looks reasonable."

Prospects for wheat appear mixed. The farms Hereward looks set to match the average of 7.5t/ha (3t/acre). "But Mercia was badly knocked about by a storm last week and I am not chuffed with Spark. It does not look a heavy crop. My fingers are crossed for a surprise."

In Cambridgeshire Bartlow Estate was hoping to start 150ha (370 acres) of barley this week. "Our Pastoral looks well. But with only just over 2in of rain since March it is not outstanding," says manager John Goodchild. "We hope to be into Otter next week."

Most of the rape was swathed last week. Yield is uncertain, as some pods were lost to frost.

Although lack of rain threatens an Essex farmers wheat on gravel, his rape is expected to be fair. "Half has been desiccated, so is ready now and we expect an average yield, about 3.5t/ha," says Simon Radborne of Aythorpe Hall near Dunmow.

"Our wheat on gravel looks terrible. But with little rain I am hoping for decent proteins for milling."

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Archive Article: 1995/07/21

21 July 1995

One of farmings future generation. Tina Ashley from Boston, Lincs, has turned 21 in the same year as the British Texel Sheep Society celebrates its 21st anniversary. Tina has had considerable success showing her two-year old ram this summer. From three outings he has secured breed champion and reserve supreme champion at the Lincs show, second at the Royal show and, last week at the Great Yorkshire show, reserve breed champion as well as champion terminal sire. More show results from Harrogate on page 41

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Archive Article: 1995/07/21

21 July 1995

Tia Rund with the John Deere trophy she received at the Royal Show for winning the 1995 Guild of Agricultural Journalists training award. One of 13 trainee journalists who attended the guilds week-long course this spring, Tia won the trophy and a cheque for £250 for her story on a visit to John Deeres UK headquarters in Nottingham by 10-year-old tractor-mad Steven Gingell. She wrote it with FARMERS WEEKLYs Farmlife in mind.

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Archive Article: 1995/07/21

21 July 1995

It is one thing to achieve high speeds in the field when spraying but for many farmers the ability to travel quickly on the roads between fields is equally important. Knight Farm Machinery has now introduced this 3000-litre, 24m trailed sprayer which is able to be towed safely at the speeds produced by the JCB Fastrac. Specification includes a commercial vehicle axle, leaf springs, air brakes and high performance tyres. The braking system includes a load-sensing system designed to apply less pressure when the sprayer is empty than full, to reduce the risk of wheels locking. Priced at £28,000, it costs about £5000 more than a normal trailed build.

With the aim of improving performance without increasing overall weight, Lemken has now fitted a heavy duty headstock to its DLVX 121 plough. Available in 4- or 5-furrows with Variowidth and Auto Reset, prices are listed at £14,587 and £17,637, respectively.

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