Archive Article: 1995/08/25 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1995/08/25

25 August 1995

About 10ha (25 acres) of Apache maize being harvested on Monday at Chris Danks Barwick Farm, Tregony, Cornwall. He estimates dry matter content at between 25% and 28% and was pleased with its cob content. A few tonnes were clamped separately for immediate feeding to his 60 milkers and the silage will be started within a week. In normal years cows would be grazing now. To compensate for lost growth, the field cleared of Apache has been rotavated and sown to Italian and Westerwolds ryegrasses which Mr Danks hopes can be zero-grazed by Christmas. Short-chopped wheat straw was mixed with the maize as it was clamped. One big bale was mixed with each load of maize to provide extra bulk and soak up effluent.

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Archive Article: 1995/08/25

25 August 1995

Fresh calvers at Berkerings Park Farm Partners, Lidlington, Beds, tuck into first-cut silage to supplement limited grazing. Sentry Farm Managements John Cook opened the clamps about a month ago but is not worried about winter forage stocks because extra silage was made from irrigated first and second-cut silage ground.

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Archive Article: 1995/08/25

25 August 1995

Drought-hit forage crop yields mean straw could be a valuable feedstuff this winter. Lincs-based Lister Taylor has introduced a range of hammer mills designed to process straw for either alkali treatment or direct bulking up of the forage portion of the diet. Models range from tractor-trailed to truck-mounted, with outputs from 3-8t/hr; static mills are also available. Prices start at £16,000, rising to £28,000.

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Archive Article: 1995/08/25

25 August 1995

CEREAL harvesting is well and truly finished with yields variable according to early summer rain and soil type. Spring crops have disappointed consistently.

By CamGrains Linton store near Cambridge just a few green-stalked beans await the combine.

Cereals have done well. "Wheats on heavy land with some rain topped 4t/acre, while on dry light land they have come in below 3t," says store manager Phil Darke. "We have averaged about a quarter tonne down on last year."

Main concern now is store heating. "There are a lot of farmers thinking 11% moisture means there is no pest threat. But if that grain heats up that can change."

Very dry grain is also prompting some to try damping. "If you have a big auger you can get away with using a hose. But there are going to be some messes, too," he says. Beans, for example, will struggle to take up moisture.

Spring rape has been "poor to disastrous". One crop budgeted for 75t was collected in a single 25t truck. "It is as bad as last year." Spring beans are very poor, winters only slightly better and peas thin. Linseed is "as poor as you would expect after no moisture."

Barometer farmer Robin Baines finished cereals last Saturday. Although Spark and Mercia disappointed on the light land at Wroxham Home Farms near Norwich, Hereward "came up trumps" with 7.4t/ha (3t/acre) to ensure an overall average to match previous years, he says.

With crops "heaped around the farm" excessive warming is now the worry, prompting efforts to ventilate earlier in the week.

Last crop to cut will be Punch winter beans for seed. Although smaller-seeded than usual, Mr Baines hopes for 3.7t/ha (1.5t/acre). Despite pod-shatter concerns cutting will not wait for damp evenings. "There is rain forecast for the end of the week and we dont want to be caught with our pants down."

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Archive Article: 1995/08/25

25 August 1995

Longer pipework means fewer bends

SILCLEARS parlour pipe-work range extends to 32mm to 40mm reducing bends.

The Hants-based company claims its fittings are made from high grade medical silicone to prevent deterioration with dairy cleaning and sterilising chemicals.

Silclear also claims to be able to make one-off specials for dispatch the day after ordering with its expanded production line. The 40mm to 32mm reducing bend costs £15 (01590-679577).

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Archive Article: 1995/08/25

25 August 1995

Farm Womens Club

This informal friendship club has more than 60 groups nationwide and is open to all female

readers of FW.

Details from

Jean Howells

(0181-652 4927)

LONDON TRIP

Tue, Sept 26, 12 noon. Lunch at the Kensington Garden Cafe, Forum Hotel, Cromwell Road, followed by visit to Buckingham Palace for guided tour. Cost £25 includes transfers from hotel to palace and on to Victoria. Names and money ASAP. Contact

Jean Howells (0181 652 4927).

CUMBRIA-PENRITH

Fri, Sept 29, 10.30am. Meet at The Hired Lad, Penrith, for coffee followed by "Antiques Roadshow" with Brian Higgs. Bring along your heirlooms and bygones for valuation. Lunch at 12.30pm followed by talk "Driven to it – Bahrain to England" by Jean Dixon and tea at 3pm. Jean Howells hopes to be there. Contact Marlene Cowperthwaite (01931-712248).

GWYNEDD-MERIONETH

Mon, Sept 4, 7pm. Meet at the Ship Hotel, Dolgellau, for talk "Bees and their products" by Shirley Furness. Contact Katherine Insley (01678-540479) or

Wendy Jones (01678-540204) by

Fri, Sept 1.

LANCASTER

Mon, Sept 4, 7.30pm. Meet at Brow Top Cafe, Quernmore, to arrange winters programme. Light refreshments will be served. Contact Catherine Tallentire

(01524-791448).

ROXBURGH

Tue, Aug 29, 7.45 for 8pm. Meet at Northsynton Farm, Ashkirk, for "Cookery demonstration using the Aga" Small charge per person to cover food costs. Contact

Judith Davies (01750-32266).

SOMERSET-MENDIP

Wed, Sept 6, noon for 12.30pm. Meet at Fenny Castle for lunch followed by talk "A policemens lot". Contact Phyllis Lee

(01749-673217).

WILTS AND GLOS

Wed, Sept 6, 2.30pm. Meet Montgomery FWC at the Hornbys garden at Hodges Barn, Shipton Moyne, nr Tetbury (featured in "Gardeners World"), followed by tea at Shipton Moyne village hall at 4.30pm. Contact Amy Bliss (01285-653453) or Sue Rawlings (01666-860321) by Aug 31.

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