Archive Article: 1995/09/01 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

Its a double success for Kenny and Bruce Mair. Having smashed the Suffolk breed record at Edinburgh with a 68,000gns ram lamb last month, they also achieved a new Texel breed record last week with this ram lamb, which made 33,000gns at Lanark. (Full details, p37)

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

Gem Sprayers Sapphire self-propelled unit can now be fitted with a demountable skid unit designed to handle most disc-type fertiliser spreaders. Seen here attached to an Amazone ZA-M spreader, the system comprises a hydraulically powered pto system, step and access platform. Price of the fertiliser skid demount is £1100.

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

After the retirement of a tenant, Siemens Pension Funds is introducing farm business tenancies to its 679-acre estate at Dunmow, Essex. Mark Hayward (left) discusses his new arrangement with Bidwells agent John Wootton.

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

Judging under way at Lancaster Auction Marts two-day show and sale of Suffolk rams, where Michael Walton gave the championship to a ram lamb from Cumbrian breeder Tony Sawrey which sold for £800. Averages: 134 shearling rams £253 and 183 ram lambs £202. (Lancaster Farmers Auction Mart.)

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

Writs served on dip companies

SOLICITORS acting for Kent farmer Gary Coomber have served High Court writs against two sheep dip manufacturers.

Mr Coomber, Little New House Farm, near Maidstone, suffers from a heart disease which has been linked to organophosphorus dip exposure (News, Mar 31).

The writs, served by London legal firm Leigh Day & Co, state that Youngs Animal Health and Mallinckrodt Veterinary, formerly Coopers Animal Health, made and supplied products which were "defective and unsafe".

They also state that the companies failed to take reasonable precautions to protect Mr Coombers health. The claim is for unlimited damages for personal injuries.

Mr Coomber has suffered repeated bouts of a heart condition called mycocarditis and suffered a cardiac arrest in June 1992. His GP, Dr Richard Bernhart, suspected his condition was linked to OP sheep dip and advised him to avoid using it.

His claim is the first of its kind to be taken to court. &#42

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

Three years development of the Topham Inverta plough marketed by Volac International has now resulted in even further refinements. Modifications to the depth, wheel and headstock linkage is claimed to have reduced power requirements to the tune of 20% which has resulted, says the manufacturer, in higher forward speeds and an overall improved performance. Other recent modifications include strengthened skimmer assemblies and modified scrapers. Furrow press arms are also available as an option. Price of the 4-furrow Topham Inverta starts at £8995.

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

Texel sire reference scheme members gathered at Chelford Market, Cheshire, to select the breeding team of progeny tested rams for this AI season. These high-index rams will be used across co-operating flocks in the scheme to compare their performance and provide an objective ram assessment. Sire reference schemes have all made genetic progress over the years and commercial prime lamb producers buying rams from scheme members should secure faster growing, leaner lambs.

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

One of the commons on the Brecon Beacons, Powys, was cleared of sheep when 20 farmers agreed to gather during the summer, as well as the annual winter gather, in an attempt to control scab. All flocks were treated for ticks, keds, lice as well as scab before they returned to the hills.

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Archive Article: 1995/09/01

1 September 1995

While the Young Farmers movement came in with calf clubs, Worcestershire members are planning to take their federation into the 21st century by growing arable crops.

Ann Rogers reports

"YOU cant just say that you are a charity and expect people to go out and give you money – you have to help yourself," says Claire White, county chairman of the Worcestershire Federation of Young Farmers Clubs.

That is the thinking behind her members farming enterprise and the reason why the federation is building its own county offices at Shires Farm, its own 12ha (30-acre) holding at Hawford.

County administrator Virginia Sutherland and a part-time secretary are currently based in offices at the college of agriculture at Hindlip. Three years ago office opening hours were changed to make the venue more accessible to working YFC members and to provide facilities for meetings – an indication of the progressive nature of the county. The office now opens 1pm-9pm Monday to Wednesday but on Thursdays and Fridays hours revert to the conventional 9am-5pm.

But the condition of the building, increasing costs and severe cut-backs in grant aid led the federations officers to reassess the situation. They decided to acquire premises of their own and to generate their own source of income to maintain them.

Though they have set out to provide for themselves, they could not achieve their goal without the support of friends – past members, friends of the federation and friendly business enterprises. Their "Building for the 21st Century" appeal, launched in April 94, has received strong support. The target sum is £75,000. To date they have raised more than £46,000 through a combination of their own efforts and gifts from supporters. And their farming enterprise is already under way.

They took possession of Shires Farm last autumn and planted the land with Brigadier wheat without delay – thanks to sponsorship from Midland Shires Farmers. The farmers co-operative is sponsoring the enterprise by supplying inputs. Tackle and labour is being provided by members and friends.

The operation is in the hands of a farming committee of members headed by Martin Powell and David Hodges and including five or six others who are involved with family farms or contractors enterprises and are keen to farm themselves. Volunteers not on the committee are welcome. "Once the management committee gets up and running the younger ones can get involved and get an insight into farming," says county vice-chairman Tony Carter.

Each of the federations 14 clubs – total membership approximately 400 – keeps in close touch with what is going on by sending representatives to meetings with the trustees: Lionel Hill (chairman), Mark Yarnold, Francis Harcombe and Malcolm Hodges. The first event held on the new farm was the Rogation Sunday service conducted by the agricultural chaplain for the county and the federations vice-president, the Rev John Willis.

The area around the barn has been landscaped, though not yet planted. Planning permission has been obtained and grant applications made for converting two bays of a partly constructed portal frame building; the third bay is being kept for agricultural purposes.

The accommodation will comprise ground floor office, boardroom, kitchen, toilets, conference-cum-meeting room, and upper floor storage area with another set of toilets.

"There will be more sense of ownership when we start building," says Claire. "Members will be able to help with painting, etc, and theres a list of things to buy."

By contributing their labour and necessities such as light bulbs or door handles, members will ensure the future of their countys YFCs. Close association with the crops and conservation side of the enterprise will help urban youngsters to a better appreciation of farming and farmers.

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