Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £129
Saving £36
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

Dairy cow numbers have fallen by about 20% since 1989 in the former Eastern Bloc countries, although this is now stabilising. In Hungary -where these dual-purpose cattle graze the Kiskunsag National Park -there are some 420,000 dairy cows typically yielding 4760kg a year.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

First-quality Mule theaves were up £9 on last years levels to average £75 at Stamfords annual sheep sale on Monday. Store lambs, too, showed an improvement of £9, to level £35. Delaying the sale two weeks helped the trade, suggest the auctioneers, although it may have also contributed to the slight fall in ram lamb values (Murrays).

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

Construction of the Tewkesbury bypass prompted a sale of buildings at Bentham Farm, Tewkesbury, Glos, last weekend. Three steel frame, asbestos roof buildings made £4100, £2450 and £1000 for 75ft x 55ft, 75ft x 30ft and 45ft x 20ft structures respectively. The offering of 1994 meadow hay, meanwhile, made between £4.28 and £4.46/bale. (Bruton Knowles)

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

Second lactation cow Geranium, an Esquimau daughter, took the "Stars 95" title at the French SPACE dairy show last week. Sammy son Esquimau is the ninth highest French sire ranked on PIN at £97. SPACE in Rennes, France, drew 81,500, including 2800 foreign visitors.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

Tom Francis with his champion Clun Forest shearling ram at Ludlow.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

By Liz Mason

Chemicals have directly harmed users health

ORGANOPHOSPHORUS chemicals have direct and adverse effects on human health, consultant psychiatrist Dr Robert Davies told south-west farmers.

He cited evidence from several sources including a recent study for the Health and Safety Executive which has been dismissed by MAFF advisers.

"The survey identified certain areas of defect in farmers brain function," said Dr Davies. "They processed information more slowly and their attention span was less than quarry workers."

Dr Davies said critics of the study sought "to take a statistically significant result and rubbish it".

He also cited a map, published by the governments Office of Population Census and Surveys, showing suicide rates for males over 45. Dr Davies said the strong correlation between suicide rate and OP sheep dip risk was extraordinary, given that suicide was such a complex phenomena.

But Department of Health experts say they have found no evidence that suicide is related to OP sheep dip, added Dr Davies. Both pieces of research work established a link but they did not prove cause and effect, he said. The next line of evidence came from work on the effect of OPs on animal brains.

Results showed that they influenced a variety of important substances in the human brain called neurotransmitters. "A number of these have been reported to be significantly disturbed following OP exposure, in particular serotonin," said Dr Davies.

Serotonin disturbance is strongly linked with impulsive suicidal behaviour and depression, a clinical feature of OP exposure.

Most alarming

Even more worrying, said Dr Davies, was recent overseas work that showed that other related systems, involved in much wider brain function, appeared to be disturbed. "I find these studies most alarming," he said. "They predict profound disorders of brain function.

"You as sufferers report it, but it is quite difficult to convince those who are the experts who regrettably are not neurochemists."

He also called for any information from the Ministry of Defences Porton Down chemical weapons research centre to be brought into the public domain.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

It beats handwork. Were evaluating a Case 8145C skid-steer Uni-Loader at the Easton Lodge pig unit to reduce the workload of Jasper Renold and his team. So far the loaders performance has been encouraging.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

Whoops! Tom Lindseys MF 165 takes an unplanned early bath in the river. Farming at Whittlesey, Peterborough, Mr Lindseys worker was tipping gravel for the drive of his house when the hydraulic pipe burst, squirting oil into his eyes. Forgetting the tractor was still in gear, he jumped off to wipe his eyes leaving the tractor to wend its way across a road to eventually plunge headfirst into a river – as seen. Mr Lindsey reports no one was hurt and the tractor and trailer have been recovered and are now in full working order once more.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

Seen as a further development of its front-mounted press introduced last year, this latest version from Lemken Tri-Ag – the Posi-Steer – is equipped with an "active" steering system; a hydraulic ram is linked to the tractors front steering wheels. It is a system which also allows total weight transfer from front wheels to press. Wheels are 72cm in diameter and 23.5cm wide (28in x 9.25in) and the design of the frame allows additional ballast to be added when conditions require it. Suitable, says the manufacturer, for tractors of up to 200hp, price of the

Posi-Steer has yet to be announced.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1995/09/22

22 September 1995

One-upmanship: Commercial carries Special Vehicles badging.

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus