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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

CATTLE

Supreme champion Ewen MacPherson and Sons three-quarter Charolais steer Donald Bhan; res, John Yates Limousin cross Belgian Blue-cross Dark Destroyer.

Supreme champion heifer MR and CE Parkers Charolais; res, AR Grieves Limousin cross Limousin Peekaboo.

Supreme champion steer Ewen MacPherson and Sons three-quarter Charolais Donald Bhan; res, John Yates Limousin-cross Belgian Blue-cross Dark Destroyer.

Champion cross-bred heifer AR Grieves Limousin cross Limousin Peekaboo; res, T and G Scotts Charolais cross Belgian Blue-cross Lady Barbara.

Champion pure-bred heifer MR and CE Parkers Charolais Bassingbourne Linda; res, A and &#42 Williams Limousin Grange Juniata.

Champion pure-bred steer PM and SM Dongers Charolais Seawell Jinksy; res, David Sinclairs Limousin Ringstones Jools.

Kings Cup for best exhibitor-bred beast Ewen MacPherson and Sons Charolais cross Charolais-cross steer Donald Bhan; res, A and &#42 Williams Limousin-cross steer Mr Showman.

Duke of Norfolk cup for best group of three pure-bred steers Limousin; res, Charolais.

Queen Mothers cup for best pure-bred native beast Robin Roberts Welsh Black steer Trebeddau Gerwyn; res, Meredydd Elliss Welsh Black Fodlas Boneddwr.

Breed champions

Belgian Blue Holly Ivorys heifer Park Linda; res, C Randalls heifer Battlesden Lollipop 11.

Charolais MR and CE Parkers heifer Bassingbourn Linda; res, PM and SM Dongers steer Seawell Jinksy.

Limousin DB Sinclairs steer Ringstones Jools; res, res, A and &#42 Williamss heifer Grange Juniata.

Hereford A Sebires steer Lower Hurst 1 Lord; A Sebires steer Lower Hurst 1 Luke.

Lincoln Red CL Bembridges steer Anwick Ultra; res, CL Bembridges heifer Anwick Wren U48.

South Devon AJ and PA Luteys steer Trengrove Bonzo; res, Mrs Brenda Hacklings steer Trevassack Favourite Pasty.

Sussex P Szechenyis steer Goldstone Keystone 3rd; res, Mr and Mrs P Ganders steer Oakvale Teddy.

SHEEP

Supreme champion Jack Bulmers Suffolks; res, David Gardiners Beltex.

Butchers weight lambs P Ritter and Sons Dutch Texels; res, J Bulmers Suffolks.

Shortwoolled lambs J Bulmers Suffolks; res, David Gardiners Beltex.

Longwoolled lambs John Coultrips Romneys; res, John Coultrips Romneys.

Mountain lambs R and T Duns North Country Cheviots; res, W and J Thomsons North Country Cheviots.

Best pen bred by exhibitor Jack Bulmers Suffolks; res, David Gardiners Beltex.

Combined live/dead butchers sheep award P Ritter and Sons Dutch Texel crosses; res, P Ritter and Sons Dutch Texel crosses.

CARCASS

Beef Lowther Park Farmss 698lb Friesian x Limousin x Charolais heifer; 260p/lb to Courtyard Beef, Sandy, Beds.

Lamb P Ritter & Sons 51lb Dutch Texel; 320p/lb to Mr &Mrs C Bristow, Redhill, Surrey.

Pork R Newby & Cos 79.5lb Large White x Landrace; 105p/lb to GArthur (Butcher), Lightwater, Surrey.

Bacon D K Turtons 72lb Large White cross; 200p/lb to Game Table Meats, Chelmsford, Essex.

Venison Mr & Mrs J Westcotts 108lb red deer hind; 185p/lb to Scottish Farm Venison, Ingliston, ERdinburgh.

Butchers weight lambs J &#42 C Campbell & Sons 55lb Texel x Beltex; 260p/lb to Beeton Rumford, Earls Court, London

Combined live/dead P Ritter & Sons 46.5lb Texel x Dutch Texel; 200p/lb to Beeton Rumford, Earls Court, London.

AUCTIONS

J Bibby Agriculture Supreme Championship beef champion Ewen MacPherson and Sons Donald Bahn, £5500 to Much Meats, Witney, Oxon.

Supreme champion lambs Jack Bulmers pair of Suffolks, £270 each to Brian Glaves, Scarborough, North Yorks.

Derbyshire producers P Ritter and Sons took the best lamb carcass title. Pictured with the winning Dutch Texel carcass is the judge John Bausor (left) and producer Eugen Ritter.

Owner Jack Bulmer (left) and stockman Bob Scott with supreme champion Suffolk lambs which beat off Comtinental challengers..

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

Centenary blighted by sparse resources

Precisely 100 years ago the Royal Smithfield Club organised its first carcass competition. So many farmers visiting the carcass hall were rightly surprised and disappointed at the low profile accorded this important milestone.

Only a small corner was devoted to a brief history of the competition. Apparently limited resources restricted promotion of the centenary this year. Thankfully, the Royal Smithfield Club promises more will be done during Smithfields 1998 bicentenial celebration.

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

SOS to the minister… over 500 signatures representing the sheep industrys response to the farmers weekly Stamp Out Scab campaign are handed over to farm minister Douglas Hogg (left) by FW livestock reporter Rebecca Austin and Editor Stephen Howe. Mr Hogg said the campaigns comments had already been considered in the sheep scab consultation document, due before Christmas. Reaction to the campaign came from all sectors, with nearly all markets and breed societies, and a number of producers and MPs, saying they wanted compulsory treatment and movement controls reintroduced.

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

Suffolk breeder Chris Partridges late-born ram lamb, included in the autumn re-run of the breeds sire reference scheme performance data, has topped the ram lamb list with an index of 346 points. This exceptional ram, from his 80-strong flock at Kersey, Suffolk, will be progeny tested next spring. Its success shows that all members of a reference scheme have the potential to produce high index stock. For more on the value of using performance recorded rams, turn to our FarmTech report, p69.

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995


All the UK ammonium nitrate manufacturers are sold out!

If you are lucky you will find a merchant with some January product still to sell, but you can expect to pay £142/t delivered, with even higher prices for February and March.

But all of a sudden there seems to be some product available out of the Baltic and traders are beginning to catch up with their old commitments.

There are even a few cargoes for sale. The price you will pay for imported product will depend on from whom you buy, as a few merchants are still offering in the £124 to £126/t range. Soon, however, £127 to £132/t will be the norm.

All the ingredients for bulk blends and compounds – particularly nitrogen and phosphate – have risen sharply over the past few weeks. And prices for spring NPK compounds and blends have moved up.

Availability of compounds is still reasonably good, though in most areas demand is high for the time of year.

At this time of year it is easy to forget about fertiliser. But it may be very hard to get hold of for January or early February, even though a lot of early buying has taken place.


FERTILISER MARKET REPORT


Fertiliser prices, Dec 1995 (£/t)

RegionDom AN*Imp ANPK 0-24-24NPK 20-10-10

South-east140130-132128-134138-146

South-west140128-130127-135138-142

East Anglia140127-130129-134138-144

Midlands140130-132128-133139-142

Wales140132-134NA138-146

North-east140128-130129-133135-140

North-west140132-134NA140-146

Scotland140132-133125-127140-145

*Indicative price only.

Source: Britannia Fertiliser Brokers and Consultants.


By Mike Stickland

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

Buyers were looking for good, working dogs and partly-trained, young animals with potential at the Bala Sheepdog Trials Committees sale last weekend. Prices reached 1150gns. This was paid for E W Ellis two-year-old bitch, Nell; and for E Williams 15-month-old dog. Overall, 42 head averaged 471gns. The next sale is on May 11. (Ruthin Farmers)

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

TEXELS: When the 300-strong Horsetin flock was dispersed at Brecon last Saturday, top price was 380gns with an average of £140.82. Rams, meanwhile, peaked at 400gns, levelling £273. (Clee, Tompkinson & Francis)

DAIRY: Prices peaked at £1200 for a newly-calved heifer at the dispersal of the Wharncliffe herd near Sheffield. Newly-calved heifers averaged £1048; and the overall average for the milking portion of the herd was £764. (Wilbys)

SHEEP QUOTA: GB lowland quota sold to average £18.94, nett, last week at an auction held near Burnham-on-Sea. Average leasing price was £5.96. Lowland sheep quota rights for the 1994 claim period averaged £6.50. (J &#42 Palmer & Sons)

STORE CATTLE: At Longtown last weekend, all classes met a stronger trade, with Charolais bullocks topping the sale at £730. Limousin bullocks made to £682; Blonde dAcquitaines to £572; Salers to £635; and Simmentals to £625. Heifers made to £552 for Belgian Blues. (Cumberland & Dumfriesshire Farmers Mart)

SUCKLER COWS: Banbury saw a vastly increased entry last week. Although there were few top-quality couples, the best on offer between £765 and £900. Very plain pairs changed hands between £540 to £640. March-calving heifers, meanwhile, made to £770; and grazing cows to £620. (Midland Marts)

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

Store lambs and breeding ewes are sold fortnightly at Builth Wells, Powys, at this time of year. Last weeks offering saw over 1500 ewes and 3600 stores forward. (Russell Baldwin and Bright)

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

This Berthoud Boxer 1500 self-propelled sprayer, which made its debut at the SIMA show in Paris earlier this year, is now available in the UK. Powered by a 100hp engine, the sprayer incorporates a 1500-litre tank, boom widths up to 28m (92ft) and variable track width. Maximum working speed is 12.4mph and price is from £48,995.

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

David Stephen checks over some of the sucklers at Barra on the outskirts of Oldmeldrum. The herd is in the process of being built up from 72 to 100, although extra quota will have to be bought or leased in.

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

Dumper or conventional trailer tipping modes are possible with Wootton Trailers Hi-Bulk kit. Priced at £2500 and available on any new 14t Wootton trailer, the kit comprises two rear-mounted rams which lift the trailers rear chassis by 0.91m (3ft); this gives a discharge height of 1.8m (6ft) for heaping up sugar beet or potatoes. The trailer can also be tipped conventionally, when carting grain, for example.

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

DO you often look up the current state of your life insurance policies? Do you occasionally go looking for a bit of GBH in the farmyard? Or is there a job on the farm that makes kamikaze pilots look positively squeamish? If the answer to all three questions is yes, then youve probably been involved in punching cattle, particularly young bulls, for beef special premium.

In Northern Ireland, every bovine thats walking, plus a few that dont, are held on a computer database by ear-tag number. Every movement of an animal to another farm, a market-place or abattoir, is by movement permit which is "logged" through that database. To my simple mind it seems incomprehensible that an archaic, barbaric system of putting holes in the ears of cattle still exists, when the opportunity for fraud by "negligent" producers seems to be nigh on zero.

As you have probably gathered, our bulls are now due for first-stage beef special premium. They are born on the farm and housed from birth to slaughter, lest they co-habitate with the poor unsuspecting females on the farm.

The bulls are one-year old at the moment and average 400kg liveweight, which is bang on target for marketing in the March to May period. This years crop seems to be moving faster since they started on the 34% dry matter second-cut silage, with 3 kg/head/day of a concentrate mix of 40% sodawheat, 20% sugar-beet pulp, 15% Brazilian soya, 15% distillers grains, 7.5% molasses and 2.5% minerals and vitamins. This mix has an estimated ME of 12.2 and a CP of 19%.

The worrying feature of this mix is that of price. At the moment its costing us £127/t, because all the ingredients were purchased in August-September. To replace those raw materials would now put the cost of that same mix up to £142!

The DANI inspector has just arrived to punch those bulls. As I prepared to go out, Cynthia pressed a lump of coal into my sweaty palm. I immediately felt that this was a sure sign of wifely concern for my safety and told her so. She replied, "Oh, Im not worried about you, I just hope it brings us some luck, that the premium form is filled in correctly!" &#42

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

FOR HEALTH…

PARADING

THIS years Lord Mayors Show had the theme "Good Health to the City and the Nation", so it was a fitting time for Young Farmers to take part in this London parade, with a float decorated with the best of British fruit and vegetables and model stock bearing the banner "growing good food for good health".

It has been a long time since the NFYFC has participated in the capitals most prestigious pageant, so long that the last date has been forgotten. But a magnificent return was made this year thanks to the generosity of Hereford federation president Clive Richards, who sponsored the entry.

"I think we should be there, as it is a good advert for farming and shows the best face of Young Farmers," says Mr Richards who has a mixed enterprise with a pedigree Hereford herd at Hope Farm, Hereford, and also works in the City.

The carpentry and construction of the float was done by Hereford members Dean and Brian Sankey, and Mark Jones, and the design was an amalgam of ideas from NFYFC chief executive Tanner Shields, former national chairman Glenn Jones and the three float builders. "We went up to London on the Wednesday and assembled the float in New Covent Garden, where we bought British fruit and vegetables to add to those kindly donated by a Herefordshire farmer," explained Glenn.

"More than 20 other members joined us in London, from Kent, Essex, Cambs and Herefords. There was lots of waiting around in the cold on the day of the parade but once we joined the procession and turned the corner and saw crowds of people standing 10-deep, the rush of adrenalin was tremendous.

"I cant explain the feeling you get when you see crowds of people greeting you with such enthusiasm and smiling faces – it was a wonderful experience for all the members concerned.

"We had a lot of television coverage and it was great PR both for farming and Young Farmers. It would be lovely to take part again but it is very expensive so perhaps it is something to aim for on significant anniversaries."

The show included people on foot and veteran and horse-drawn vehicles. The Lord Mayor of London, Alderman John Chalstrey, (middle picture above) travelled in a golden coach (below) drawn by a team of grey Shires.

The tractor-drawn float, followed by young farmers dressed as fruit and vegetables, passing St Pauls cathedral.

Designs, for three years.

This year she has been commissioned to create two Christmas cards for the Farming and Wildlife Trust and has six other designs available (two designs per pack of six cards, £2.60 including postage). These include one showing Father Christmas looking somewhat puzzled over the headcollar left at the foot of a little girls bed, which is obviously much too big for the toy horse he has brought her. Another shows him on a snowswept rooftop eye-to-eye with a pony digging its heels in and refusing to go down the chimney.

Jane is looking for ways to expand the business and has already started a new line built on her artistic talents. "While I was watching my daughter clear the jumps, a new idea came to me," she says. "I dont suppose you can have a container mind but I do like boxes, and it occurred to me that I could make a box shaped like a jump and fill it with stationery. I now do four writing sets: Hickstead Fence, Badminton Fence, Olympia Fence and Wembley Fence (£5.99 each). We have had big order for these from FR Grays & Sons, Walsall, who distribute my cards to tack shops."

"I have the jumps printed on to flat card and assemble them here. For this order I had the whole family, neighbours and friends, folding and sticking and counting paper and envelopes like a production line. Robert said I was turning the house into a factory, she laughs.

"I now need to expand the business slowly and there is a factory unit at the bottom of the village just waiting for me. Robert says it is too early for that but hopefully it wont be long before I need it."

* Inquiries (01547-540498).

The NFYFC float was finished off under the arches at the New Covent Garden Market three nights before the show by (L to R second from top) Dean Sankey, Brian Sankey, Mark Jones, Anne Helbling and Glenn Jones.

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Archive Article: 1995/12/01

1 December 1995

Cake decorator Dorothy Shaw shows (L to R) Betty Trewhill, Pamela Fryer and Mary Bracewell how to make icing bags at the clubs October meeting.

NORTH Yorkshire FWC met at the village hall in Hunton, a delightful village with light coloured stone houses.

Members were expecting a talk on humorous poetry but got a cake decorating demonstration instead. Dorothy Shaw, the demonstrator for the afternoon, transformed an ordinary sponge cake into a beautiful looking gateau in next to no time, she made it look so easy.

Some of the members had a go at making piping bags and practised icing. It really gave me inspiration to do something special for my Christmas cake this year.

Carol Pounder and Mabel Worsdale served afternoon tea while Elsie Kirby and Joyce Brass introduced me to other members of the club.

Mrs Raw organised the raffle and for once I won something, some juicy little pears which tasted delicious as I drove across to the Lake District that evening.

I thought the M25 was bad enough for lunatic driving but was amazed that up over the dales when I slowed down for some cows in the road a "local" overtook me like a bat out of hell!

JH

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