Archive Article: 1996/05/17 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1996/05/17

17 May 1996

Shearing of 500 Mule tegs was under way last week at J W Gore & Sons 465ha (1150-acre) Manor Farm, West Ilsley, Berks, by contractors K & M Shepherding. Robert Gore hopes that ewes will have sufficient growth of wool ready for sale later this summer.

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Archive Article: 1996/05/17

17 May 1996

Lime added to spent Bayticol dip removes over 99% of its active ingredient, flemethrin, and reduces environment risks caused by accidental spillage and run-off.

So claims its maker, Bayer, which cites trials to show that 5kg of powdered agricultural lime added to 100 litres (22 gal) of the non-OP dip increases the solutions pH to 11. At this level the dips flumethrin is degraded.Mix lime and dip for five minutes before use.

The concentrates should be remixed every two to three days and for at least 14 days. Neutralising the dip in this way costs under £8 a 1000 litres (220 gal) of dip, says Bayer.

"After 14 days the spent dipwash and lime should be disposed of in the normal way by applying to a suitable piece of land at under 5000 litres/ha. To achieve this rate the concentrate can be further diluted with water or slurry," says Bayticols Kevin Stevens.

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Archive Article: 1996/05/17

17 May 1996

Low level surface application of sewage sludge onto grass will be demonstrated at Grassland 96. The Water Services Association estimates the total nutrient value of sludge used by UK farmers, based on bag-fertiliser prices, at about £25m a year. And because it has a water content of between 90 and 96%, liquid sewage sludge is beneficial to growers in dry seasons, it says. The WSA says supplies are available to farmers in most areas, either from the regional water service company or from specialised sewage sludge contractors. Most sludge is available at little or no cost. To compare sludge and inorganic treated grass, visit the WSA at plot 123.

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Archive Article: 1996/05/17

17 May 1996

Austrian firm Pottinger is making a renewed push in the UK, with a full grassland line-up. Above: The Nova 310TCR mower conditioner has a swivel drawbar for tight turns, high-lift frame for big swath clearance, and shaft plus belt drive to cutter bar and conditioner. Bottom: The TOP 800 rotary rake is capable of side sweeping 6.7m (22ft) of grass into a single swath. This can be doubled to 13.2m with a pass in the opposite direction – sufficient for the largest forager.

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Archive Article: 1996/05/17

17 May 1996

BESIDES fun activities such as its-a-knock-out and human table football, sporting challenges included the finals of the ladies 11-a-side hockey, which was won by Lincolnshire with Norfolk second and Devon A third; mens 11 a-side football was won by Devon A, with Staffordshire second and Cumbria third. The national swimming final was won by Yorkshire A, with Staffordshire second and Brecknock third.

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Archive Article: 1996/05/17

17 May 1996

PRESENTATIONS at the conclusion of the agm included the Merrick Burrell tankard awarded to Gwent, the county with the largest percentage increase in membership over the past three years. This federation had achieved an increase of almost 50%, which included the formation of a new junior club with 240 members.

The NFU trophy for the champion county federation in national competition finals was presented jointly to Cornwall and Devon. Reserve was Herefordshire which received the Tug Wilson cup. Derbyshire was the champion small county federation and received the Worshipful Company of Farmers trophy.

The RASE cup for the club of the year went to Loddon YFC, Norfolk, while another Norfolk club, Norwich YFC, received the Westminster Bank Countryside Challenge trophy.

YFC member of the year Steven Cain, from the Isle of Man, was among the recipients of Plumb gold medals.

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Archive Article: 1996/05/17

17 May 1996

BSE is the biggest issue to hit both agriculture and rural communities for decades, said NFYFC vice chairman Peter Morris, who presented a statement from an open meeting on BSE to the agm, where delegates gave it their full support.

"There is no scientific evidence that BSE can be transmitted to humans but we are not complacent about this and support actions taken to eliminate any possibility of this happening," say the young farmers.

To speed up the process of eradication, they support the disposal of cattle over the age of 30 months, but oppose any scheme for the wholesale slaughter of healthy cattle.

They expressed disappointment at the reactions of certain governments and the EU which had made the problem much worse, and at the way some sectors of the food industry were replacing British products from sources whose hygiene and welfare standards would not be permitted in the UK.

Among the issues they ask the industry to consider is the traceability of animals, labelling of animal feed content, support for those people affected and the effect on the whole rural community.

Peter Morris: Biggest issue.

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Archive Article: 1996/05/17

17 May 1996

BRENDAN Loughran is to be the next chief executive of NFYFC. He will take up his post on Aug 1 when Tanner Shields retires.

Mr Loughran, who is currently deputy principal youth and community officer for Norfolk County Council, postponed a holiday in Canada to be in Torbay for the convention.

The post of treasurer which Tanner also filled, has been taken on by Bernard Roundthwaite who has been seconded from Barclays Bank to allow Mr Loughran to spend as much time as possible getting out and meeting members.

Other staff changes include the appointment of Annie Green as youth work development officer for the south-west and West Midland areas, and Jenny Bashford as agricultural officer. The latters responsibilities will include leading the federation in public debate on agriculture and rural issues and liaising with agricultural colleges.

YFC is funded through subsidies, grants and donations as well as subscriptions. Grants for the next three years include £120,000 from the Department of Education and Employment which is tied in with planned projects, and £5,000 through partnership with the Council for Environmental Education to build a young peoples network of environmental forums.

"Subscription levels are extremely low for the benefits received from YFC," said chairman of the board of management Chris French.

A motion to increase the national levy by 3% with effect from Jan 1, 1997 was carried overwhelmingly. This is equivalent to about 19p for a senior member.

Board of Management chairman Chris French: Subscription levels are low.

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