Archive Article: 1996/08/30 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1996/08/30

30 August 1996

HEAVY showers halted harvesting with most wheat and spring barley still to be cut. Rain continued to disrupt combining over most of the area early this week.

Barometer grower David Price, Barland Farm, Presteigne, was among the many frustrated growers whose combines were idle. Pembrokeshire coast producer Meurig Raymond was luckier.

"We benefited from being on the edge of a high pressure area in the Atlantic," Mr Raymond said. "The barley yielded 6.6t/ha (55cwt/acre) at 16%. The sample lost some colour, but the specific weight is 70, and we have high hopes for its malting quality."

Local forecasts indicate he should finish the 141.4ha (350 acres) of barley, and pick up the last of the 4.2t/ha (1.7t/acre) yielding swathed winter oilseed rape this week. Rain is likely to prevent a start on four winter wheat varieties. The crops are badly lodged. There is no sign of sprouting, but quality might be a problem.

Delays and previous slow clearance of unusually heavy winter barley crops are certain to put contractors under severe pressure.

David Evans, who runs arable and beef enterprises at Moelygarth, Guilsfield, Powys, sees both sides of the problem. He also drives a combine for a contractor and has been involved in the slow harvesting of some very high yielding crops.

"I do not think I combined a winter barley crop yielding less than 7.2t/ha, and most wheats in the area look very promising," Mr Evans claims.

His own winter barleys did very well. Hannah yielded 8.4t/ha (3.5t/acre) of first class plump grain. Intro produced 7.2t/ha (3t/acre), but the sample was disappointing, and the crop lodged. Bambi grown from saved seed yielded just as well as Intro, but stood better, gave a super bold sample, and provided plenty of high quality feeding straw.

The showers left him with a field of spring barley and 3.2ha (8acres) of triticale to do. Triticale has been grown for several years on land close to a large number of badger sets.

"Badgers roll in wheat and barley, but do not seem to like the spiky straw and prominent awns of triticale." Mr Evans claims "The crop does not need fungicide, so it is cheap to grow and has yielded 7.2t/ha (3t/acre) in the past."

In other parts of the England-Wales border, and as in South Wales, harvesting has been badly affected by rain. Peter Davies, Durval Farm, St Brides Major, Glamorgan, says he has seven combining days left once the sheet comes off the combine.

His winter barleys produced mixed results, but averaged around 6.6t/ha (2.75t/acre). He had combined 12 of his 48ha of winter wheat before being rained off.

Pressing on amid the gloom to beat the weather at Beckerings Park Farm Partners, Lidlington, Bedfordshire. Some wish overtime had begun sooner.

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Archive Article: 1996/08/30

30 August 1996

Pictured is Fir House Farm, Newtown, Powys, where a dispersal sale was held for Philip Jones last week. Buyers came from far and wide to bid for over 100 mainly Hereford and Limousin cross cows with calves. Among the top calls were £1000 for a heifer with a female calf at foot and £940 for a cow with her bull calf. Charolais cross bullocks, up to 14 months old, peaked at £450. When the flock of nearly 1200 ewes and store lambs went under the hammer, notable bids included £74 for Beulah yearlings, £81 for Welsh Mule yearlings and £59 for theave lambs. (Morris, Marshall and Poole.)

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Archive Article: 1996/08/30

30 August 1996

Shropshire milk producer Ray Kynaston treating heifers with Ridect fly repellant to protect them against summer mastitis at his 29ha (72-acre) Brook House Farm, Leebotwood, Shrewsbury. Last year he used only stockholm tar and one heifer suffered summer mastitis. His vet Clive Norrell of Malthouse Surgery, Minsterley, advised him to use the pour-on for extra protection against flies this year. Mr Norrell urges producers to remain vigilant against flies until October.

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Archive Article: 1996/08/30

30 August 1996

The view ringside as the Warninglid Charolais herd is dispersed for Mrs M Lavell near Haywards Heath, West Sussex, last weekend. Top price was 6000gns for a maiden heifer. Averages included £1547 for cows in calf and/or with calf at foot, £1229 for in-calf heifers, £951 for maiden heifers and £809 for young bulls. (United Auctions.)

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Archive Article: 1996/08/30

30 August 1996

CATERPILLAR IN

METAMORPHOSIS

Caterpillar dealer Finning is to take over the UK territory operated by &#42 Leverton – a move which will, for the first time, put the marketing of Caterpillar agricultural, construction and power products into the hands of just one company.

Based in Cannock, Finning is the Caterpillar dealer for the south-west, midlands, Scotland and Wales while Leverton commanded the eastern areas.

The future of Levertons business has been in doubt since parent company, Unilever, decided to withdraw from its "non-core" Caterpillar dealership business earlier this year. With annual sales of £250m and 900 employees, Levertons business clearly had some clout. But all may still not be lost.

Finning is currently in negotiation with Unilever over the possible purchase of Levertons UK business.

According to a Finning statement, the company "Intends to sell its finance portfolio in Britain and to withdraw as the Caterpillar dealer in Poland. The resulting proceeds will be used to finance the acquisition of Leverton".

This being the case, it would be reasonable to assume that existing Leverton customers would continue to receive the same level of service as before.

&#8226 Finning also has Caterpillar dealerships in western Canada and Chile. Last year the company reported a net income of over $77m from sales worth $1.7bn.

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Archive Article: 1996/08/30

30 August 1996

More than 200 works featuring British farm animal portraiture, including items on loan from private and public collections, will be on show at the OShea Gallery, London from Sep 12-Oct 5.

They include The Craven Heifer (right) an engraving by I Whessel on loan from Chatsworth;

Portrait of a grey cart horse (below) by an unknown artist and Silver Wyandotte cockerels, (right)an oil on canvas signed and dated Wippell 1908.

Prices of original prints range from £50 to £5000 and for oil paintings from £2000 to

£20,000. Among the prints are representations of legendary animals which have become

part of local folk lore, such

as the Durham Ox which

weighed 272 stone.

Inquiries (0171-629-1122).

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