Archive Article: 1996/11/22 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1996/11/22

22 November 1996

NFU president, Sir David Naish, inspects the carcasses at the National Primestock show on Monday at Stafford with David Bradshaw, president of the Birmingham Agricultural Exhibition Society. Sir David praised the standard of entry, saying the UK had the best beef industry in the world. Steer values leapt 6p to 111p/kg lw this week.

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Archive Article: 1996/11/22

22 November 1996

Supreme champion at the British Simmental Cattle Societys show and sale at Carlisle. The 22-month-old bull Bemersyde Foremost came from Charles Bruce, Melrose. But this was a day when trade for bulls was sticky. Top bid was 1900gns, paid by J Innes and Sons, Aberdeen for Brinkton Franklin in a deal struck after the animal left the ring with breeder Robert Lunness, Goole, Humberside. Females peaked at 1600gns for a Sapling Vaquero heifer suckling her first calf from the Whitepool herd of Mrs Jane Smith, Usk, Gwent. Averages: 17 bulls £1259 and 27 females £1033. (Harrison and Hetherington)

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Archive Article: 1996/11/22

22 November 1996

Anyone got a leaking roof? Tiles go under the hammer at W G Edwards recent dispersal at Park House Farm, Eccleshall, Staffs. But the days highlight was the offering of 119 Holstein Friesians, which attracted a top bid of £1340. That came for a heifer by Triosex, close to calving with her second. The milking herd, typically giving 6400kg at 3.97% butterfat and 3.90% protein, averaged £778 with the top 17 cattle levelling over £1000. (Bagshaws.)

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Archive Article: 1996/11/22

22 November 1996

Dam of the Bell Elton son Henkeseen Hilton – now available from Green Acres Select. This young bull has a predicted PIN of £116 and a predicted type merit index of +1.92.

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Archive Article: 1996/11/22

22 November 1996

Daughter of Fecamp, said to be the most interesting sire to emerge from the latest French proof run, and which is now available from Supersires. He is a Ugela Bell son from a VG Cleitus member of the world famous Sweet family at Conant Acres. His UK production proof at 62% reliability is 747kg milk, 27kg (-0.09%) fat, 24kg (0.0%) protein, and £92 PIN. Semen is priced at £25 a dose.

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Archive Article: 1996/11/22

22 November 1996

Cloth replaces leather inside this more workmanlike version of the lavishly furnished Jeep Grand Cherokee. Priced at £26,495, about £3500 less than the standard Grand, the Grand Laredo also does without its siblings electrically-operated/heated seats and sophisticated climate control system – although it still gets air conditioning. Engine choice is between 2.5-litre VM turbodiesel and 4.0-litre petrol, and the vehicle should be in showrooms from January.

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Archive Article: 1996/11/22

22 November 1996

Keeping disease risk to minimum

SHOULD the question mark over maternal transmission of BSE give pause to anyone buying heifers from an unknown source? For Somerset vet and cattle veterinary practitioner Roger Eddy it is a long way down the list of concerns. "If you are buying in replacements, you are in the risk business," he says. Far better to avoid the process altogether, in his view.

"It is all about comparative risk assessment. You have to evaluate the damage to your herd that would arise from introducing a new infectious disease like IBR, or leptospirosis, or even digital dermatitis.

"If you do not already have them, the risk is far greater in terms of economic loss than that from buying a cow that subsequently develops BSE."

He believes dairy farmers still have much to learn about disease security, especially the risks involved in getting them from an unknown source.

"Pig farmers would not dream of going to a market or to a dealer to buy in replacement gilts or boars," he points out. "And the last thing they would do would be to buy them from France, Germany or Holland."

If you must buy in stock, he advises the following precautions to guard against importing any new infectious diseases:

lBe aware of your own farms infectious disease status.

lBlood test every animal against conditions such as leptospira, IBR, BVD and the contagious mastitis Strept agalactiae. Relate the result to your own herd. A positive blood test is an asset when adding newcomers to a herd that tests positive for these infections.

lQuarantine new arrivals for 30 days, in case they are incubating something nasty.

lCheck TB history, especially when drawing from herds in the south west.

lImported stock should carry with them a blood test certificate declaring that they have come from a holding free from TB, Brucellosis and EBL. But there will be no cover against other infectious diseases, some of which do not normally occur in this country.

Mr Eddys advice is endorsed by ADASs Helen Woolley. "Apart from the quality of the animal itself, in terms of the production criteria you are looking for, you should decide the health status of the animals required, depending on that of the herd that they would be going into," says Ms Woolley.

"Do not be afraid to ask some penetrating questions," she adds. Nothing can eliminate all risk, however. When asked what is the best way of reducing it when considering introducing replacements from outside, Roger Eddys advice is unmistakably succinct: "Do not buy them."

Keeping disease risk to minimum

SHOULD the question mark over maternal transmission of BSE give pause to anyone buying heifers from an unknown source? For Somerset vet and cattle veterinary practitioner Roger Eddy it is a long way down the list of concerns. "If you are buying in replacements, you are in the risk business," he says. Far better to avoid the process altogether, in his view.

"It is all about comparative risk assessment. You have to evaluate the damage to your herd that would arise from introducing a new infectious disease like IBR, or leptospirosis, or even digital dermatitis.

"If you do not already have them, the risk is far greater in terms of economic loss than that from buying a cow that subsequently develops BSE."

He believes dairy farmers still have much to learn about disease security, especially the risks involved in getting them from an unknown source.

"Pig farmers would not dream of going to a market or to a dealer to buy in replacement gilts or boars," he points out. "And the last thing they would do would be to buy them from France, Germany or Holland."

If you must buy in stock, he advises the following precautions to guard against importing any new infectious diseases:

lBe aware of your own farms infectious disease status.

lBlood test every animal against conditions such as leptospira, IBR, BVD and the contagious mastitis Strept agalactiae. Relate the result to your own herd. A positive blood test is an asset when adding newcomers to a herd that tests positive for these infections.

lQuarantine new arrivals for 30 days, in case they are incubating something nasty.

lCheck TB history, especially when drawing from herds in the south west.

lImported stock should carry with them a blood test certificate declaring that they have come from a holding free from TB, Brucellosis and EBL. But there will be no cover against other infectious diseases, some of which do not normally occur in this country.

Mr Eddys advice is endorsed by ADASs Helen Woolley. "Apart from the quality of the animal itself, in terms of the production criteria you are looking for, you should decide the health status of the animals required, depending on that of the herd that they would be going into," says Ms Woolley.

"Do not be afraid to ask some penetrating questions," she adds. Nothing can eliminate all risk, however. When asked what is the best way of reducing it when considering introducing replacements from outside, Roger Eddys advice is unmistakably succinct: "Do not buy them."

Helen Woolley of ADAS: "When buying herd replacements decide the health status required as well as the basic production criteria."

Buy heifer replacements from sources of known quality and health status.

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