Archive Article: 1997/08/15 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1997/08/15

15 August 1997

Touring the summer shows is hard work and can mean days on the road in the wagon. But for many farmers its an annual ritual. Why? Because its a lot of fun, and provides a chance to catch up with old friends and the latest farming gossip. Not forgetting, of course, that a string of wins at the most prestigious events can add thousands of pounds to an animals value. With this years show season drawing to a close, FW remembers a cross-section…

Breeders and enthusiasts descended in force on Stoneleigh, Warks, for the four-day Royal Show from June 30. With heavy rain falling in the run-up to the event, umbrellas were an essential accessory. But fears of a washout proved unfounded and the Royal again was the place to be. Those wanting a glimpse of the future called in to the FW stand, where Farmers Weeklys Internet service was launched.

Flat out in the cattle lines at the Royal… Sometimes its a case of grabbing some shut-eye when you can. The animals, it seems, sometimes take a lead from the stockmen. Still, straws comfy enough.

Left: All that walking builds up an appetite – and beefburgers are a popular choice. These youngsters check out one of the catering facilities at the bi-centennial Three Counties Show, staged at Malvern from June 10 to 12.

Its all in the presentation… getting a fleece to look as good as this takes a lot of effort. And theres never any shortage of brushes, buckets or hair-driers in the stock lines. This Scottish Blackface yearling ewe belonging to John Jordan won the interbreed class at The Royal Cornwall in early June. It was a also good day for Peter Old, whose Charolais cow Moynton Fresia took the beef interbreed title for the third year running. Will it be four in a row next year?

One little piggy went to market. These, however, went to the Lincolnshire Show in June. More than 78,000 people went, too.

Above: The end of May – and if you thought a Suffolk sheep might take the supreme title in Suffolk, youd have been wrong…it went to this Charollais shearling ewe from Mary Tulloch.

The sun was shining on Welsh Black cattle at the Royal Welsh last month. The national breed scooped top honours in the beef interbreed pairs class – the first time for 15 years. Smiles on the roads around Builth Wells, too, with no repeat of last years traffic chaos. British Whites made their debut at the event.

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Archive Article: 1997/08/15

15 August 1997

GRASS growth is above average in most areas, although a large variation still exists ranging from 30 to 70kg DM/ha. Heavy rainfall will mean above average grass growth should continue into September, particularly in the south.

Some freshly calved cows are producing well – 15 to 20 litres – on grazed grass. This milk is either from silage aftermaths or grass that was tightly grazed or mown in July. The farmers getting the benefits from grass now are those that concentrated on grazing management over the last few months and have created quality pasture.

If you want cows to graze, buffer feed needs to be reduced or eliminated first, so the cows have an appetite and need to graze.

If you feel you have lost control of grass quality over the summer, now is the time to focus on building up quality grass for September. The only way to do this is hard grazing or, if you are not prepared to do this, go in with a mower and bottom the pasture to eliminate seed heads and stalks. Do it now.

Ensuring the availability of high quality grass will maximise milk off late summer/autumn grass.

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Archive Article: 1997/08/15

15 August 1997

East Anglian grain is loaded onto the 2400t ship, Jason, at Kings Lynn, destination Lisbon. Portugal and Spain have provided the UK with a much needed outlet for feed barley this year, partly because of the delayed Spanish harvest, says Graham Hopton of Beds-based Banks.

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Archive Article: 1997/08/15

15 August 1997

After 12 months on-farm testing in UK conditions, the Spanish sourced Nutrifeed mixer wagon is now available from Preston-based Collinson. Built by Tecnomixer, units with capacities of 10, 12, 14 and 18 cu m are offered, all of which employ a vertical auger and capable, it is claimed, of handling unsplit large round or square bales.Standard specification includes programmable electronic scales with weights displayed digitally, and a front discharge point employing a variable height slatted conveyor. Prices start at £14,500. (01995-606451).

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Archive Article: 1997/08/15

15 August 1997

Hold on tight… five-year-old Amy Grant proudly parades Ardmore Liberty, her dads Blonde dAquitaine heifer from Earlsfield, Huntly. It was judged the best of its breed at last weeks Turiff Show in Aberdeenshire. Amy was one of about 50,000 visitors attending the two-day event.

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Archive Article: 1997/08/15

15 August 1997

A final walk round the Portal herd of Ayrshires for herdsman Gordon Allan. Of his 50 years working with the breed, nearly half has been with these animals. Based at Heath Hill, Bourton-on-the-Water, Glos, the herd was sold for Marshall Brooks, topping at 1160gns. The average for 90 cows was £444, reports auctioneer Bruton Knowles.

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