Archive Article: 1997/08/19 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1997/08/19

19 August 1997

Farmers all around the country are gearing up for the NSAs big ram sale at Builth Wells next Monday (Sept 22). FW called in on one Devon family who are regulars at the event…

Home to the Quick family is the 344ha (850-acre) Loosebeare Manor, Zeal Monachorum, where they keep about 1700 ewes. This includes 250 pedigree Texels and 70 pedigree Rouge de lOuest sheep.

Feeding time for some of the nearly 50 Texels that Bill Quick and his sons – Paul, Andrew and Mark – have entered for the auction at the Royal Welsh Showground. Theyll be among a total entry of 9000, representing 36 breeds, making this the biggest-ever such sale.

No mean feat, this… The NSA auction is itself a huge logistical task. With the sheep sold under cover in giant marquees, more than 231,000sq ft of tentage and 10,000 hurdles are required. Last years event saw a turnover of more than £2.1m.

Paul Quick inspects Caliph tipped to be among the high prices. This ram was champion shearling Texel ram at the Royal Cornwall and second in his class at the Royal Show this year. But there again, he does come from a good family – his sire was once male supreme champion at the Royal.

Preparation can be pretty strenuous sometimes…

Time for a coffee break… Bill and Paul look back over the catalogue from last year, at which one of their Texels made the top-price of 950gns…

…The Quicks back-up team also take the

opportunity to cool off and fill up on reserves.

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Archive Article: 1997/08/19

19 August 1997

Averages at Thainstones two-day gimmer sale last week were £87 for Halfbreds, £93 for Cheviots, £89 for Mules and £82 for Greyfaces. Despite earlier cold wet weather, sheep were in good bloom.

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Archive Article: 1997/08/19

19 August 1997

Conference pointers

&#8226 Be profit orientated, not production orientated – yield a cow cannot dominate your thinking.

&#8226 Farmer with lowest cost of production and investment per unit of output is the one who will be in business 20 years hence.

&#8226 Limit to getting high production off grass is not the cow or the land, it is the farm management and quality of grass.

&#8226 Two great myths in British dairying are that autumn grass is worth nothing and that increasing milk production will spread fixed costs. As litres grow, fixed costs also grow.

&#8226 Role of farmer discussion groups is vital to share and learn from the ideas and experiences of like minded farmers.

&#8226 No place for sheep in winter on well run dairy farm.

&#8226 Block rather than strip grazing increases grass production by 27%

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Archive Article: 1997/08/19

19 August 1997

LEVELLING boards and tines are available on smaller versions of Knight Farm Machinerys Triple Press.

Complementing the existing 6-10m (20-33ft) wide range, the smaller 2.8-5m (9.1-16.4ft) models can be equipped with a cultivation section, between the drawbar and double roll section.

"Its a modular construction weve used on the smaller models, which enables the machine to be used as a light roll, furrow press or landpacker, by adding the cultivator frame and ballast weight," explains Knights John Holme.

The cultivator section uses a row of tines followed by a row of levelling paddles which break down ploughed land before the two rows of ring rolls complete the cutting and firming action.

Price of the 2.8m (9.1ft) Triple Press with cultivator tines is about £11,000.n

A row of tines and levelling paddles can be fitted to smaller versions of Knight Farm Machinerys Triple Press.

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