Archive Article: 1997/09/12 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1997/09/12

12 September 1997

After the inaugural event last summer, the second Great Yorkshire Sheep Sale took place last week…

About 260 animals, representing 13 breeds, were entered for the event, held at the Great Yorkshire Showground. Texels, Suffolk and Charollais accounted for the bulk. Here the Suffolks get put through their paces.

They start them young in Cumbria… ask 20-month-old Edward Hird.

Smile, youre a winner… the supreme champion eventually went to a Charollais ram lamb from J and W Ripley, Thirsk.

Right: Making the long journey south was Jim Thomson (left). He brought North Country Cheviot females from Hownam Grange, Kelso, his hill farm rising to 1600ft above sea-level. Here, Jim chats about the prospects for the year ahead with Keith and Elaine Stone. The Stones didnt have quite so far to travel – they came from Richmond, North Yorks.

The run-up to the big day was a busy time for show secretary Christine Thompson, seen here talking to Lincs-based Jim Garnar. Mrs Thomspon took some of her Ile de France sheep to the event, but they didnt find a buyer. "Well keep them over the winter and decide what to do with them as shearlings," she says.

Philip and Shirley Hughes apply the final touches to their Texels.

For some people it was a case of coming to the showground, buying some sheep, and then dashing home to get back on the combine.

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Archive Article: 1997/09/12

12 September 1997

Forage maize harvest is progressing night and day as warm, dry weather sees maturity advancing quickly.

Contractors arrived at WJ and FJ Hadleys 98ha (240-acre) Home Farm, Colne Engaine, Essex, to cut 10ha (26 acres) at 8pm. Bill Hadley says that grain had hardened on the very early Jannus maize and contractors found a slot to harvest the crop between combining wheat and before moving onto larger maize crops further north in East Anglia. At PR and AM Smiths 118ha (290-acre) Meadow Farm, West Stow, Suffolk, maize yields are expected to be slightly lower this year at about 25t/ha (10t/acre). "While low rainfall here on our light soil has limited green growth, cobs were hard and ready for harvest so we had to cut now to maximise quality," says maize grower Peter Smith. Although the grain is fit, there is still a lot of moisture in the stem.

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Archive Article: 1997/09/12

12 September 1997

Not going, going, gone… although rising above £5000, bidding for this Dowdeswell 100S plough didnt reach the reserve at a collective machinery sale on Newark showground, Notts last week. DDM auctioneer James McIntyre says demand for kit is weaker in the face of the strong £ sterling. But it could get stronger once harvest ends.

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Archive Article: 1997/09/12

12 September 1997

Deep ruts, stuck combines and soggy crops have all added to frustrations this harvest. But better weather was expected to see most crops cleared this week as here at Graham Walkers Home Farm, Winchcombe, Glos (main pic). Despite the late date contractor Philip Odam cleared Brigadier at 11.1t/ha (4.5t/acre) and 18% moisture.

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Archive Article: 1997/09/12

12 September 1997

Granular pesticides can now be handled more safely using Rhône-Poulencs new Surefill chemical transfer system. All contact with the active ingredient is avoided, preventing problems with spillage and dust, says market development manager David James. The strengthened plastic container couples to a valve on the applicator as simply as a light bulb screws into a bayonet socket. Containers deliver 20kg of granules and if part-used remain air-tight so granules remain dry during storage. Ordering Temik (aldicarb) in a Surefill container does not add to cost and packs can be re-turned for re-filling, so avoiding disposal problems.

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