Archive Article: 1997/11/14 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1997/11/14

14 November 1997

A commercial herd of more

than 200 suckler cows and

stores was up for auction

last week on one Devon

farm. FW called in on

proceedings…

AVERAGES


Averages£/head

Cows with

spring-born calves (68)878

Cows with

autumn-born calves (19)610

In-calf and served

cows (16)496

The herd at Newland Farm, Cullompton was, according to auctioneers Stags, in "extremely fine heart and condition". The spring- and autumn-born calves were by Charolais and Limousin bulls respectively.

Let there be light… Preparations under way in the sale shed. Fastening up the lighting, however, posed a bit more of a challenge than you might think.

The auction in full swing and a big crowd of locals, together with visitors from Oxfordshire, Warwickshire, Wiltshire and Somerset, ensured bidding was brisk. Charolais cross cows with steer calves made to £1150.

George Baker is a well-known face at West Country dispersal sales. And a youngster looks on, perhaps to pick up a few tips on buying.

Sausage and chips, all round… helpers Gerry Denford (left) and Ivor and Ruth Denyer grab a bite to eat from the catering van. On a day like this, with all hands to the pump, it was a case of eating "on the hoof".

No, not karaoke night, but auctioneer Richard Turner in action. Other notable prices taken at this event included £700 for a Simmental cross cow and £505 for Charolais cross steers on green CIDs.

The last straw… Ivor Denyer busy with final preparations for this sale for the J Grant Cann Partnership.

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Archive Article: 1997/11/14

14 November 1997

Three on the trot… supreme champion bull at the British Limousin Cattle Societys autumn show and sale at Banbury, Oxon, last weekend was Sheelin Mason. This marked the third year running that the champ had come from Matt Brunton of Broxbourne, Herts. This April 1996-born son of Fenrose Gambit topped the trade at 2000gns.


In the black… a breed record was set for Welsh Black cattle at last weeks show and sale at Dolgellau. The bull, Graig-Goch Capten 12th, from Emyr Jones, Llanrwst made 9500gns. Buyers were Mr and Mrs Dimey-Seek, Wells, Somerset, who have built up a select herd on Graig-Goch bloodlines. The animal, led here by Mr Joness son, Gerwyn, also took the days supreme championship. Reserve ticket went to Fodlas Peredur 3rd, a son of the societys current bull of the year. From Mr and Mrs Meredydd Ellis, he made 3500gns. Overall averages were £2402 for 14 bulls and £401 for 97 females.

In the black… a breed record was set for Welsh Black cattle at last weeks show and sale at Dolgellau. The bull, Graig-Goch Capten 12th, from Emyr Jones, Llanrwst made 9500gns. Buyers were Mr and Mrs Dimey-Seek, Wells, Somerset, who have built up a select herd on Graig-Goch bloodlines. The animal, led here by Mr Joness son, Gerwyn, also took the days supreme championship. Reserve ticket went to Fodlas Peredur 3rd, a son of the societys current bull of the year. From Mr and Mrs Meredydd Ellis, he made 3500gns. Overall averages were £2402 for 14 bulls and £401 for 97 females.

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Archive Article: 1997/11/14

14 November 1997

Beginners luck? Lucks got nothing to do with it, with stock looking this good. Brian and Richard Quantick took the championship on their showing debut at Mondays suckled calf show at Newton Abbot, Devon. Their February-born Limousin cross South Devon cattle sold for £510 apiece. The days highest bid was £575. Trouble is, laughs Mrs Quantick, having won on our debut, the only way now is down.

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Archive Article: 1997/11/14

14 November 1997

Aside from the continuing contract wrangles between British Sugar and growers, beet lifting and processing continues. At Listers Farm, Southery Fen, Norfolk, Nigel Lewis lifts 12.5ha of Jackpot which was drilled on Apr 8. Nearby, at British Sugars Whissington factory, up to 700 loads of beet are arriving each day.

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Archive Article: 1997/11/14

14 November 1997

&#8226 SHEEP identification, farm assurance and marketing will be discussed at the NSAs Sheep Health and Welfare conference to be held at Malvern, Worcs, on Nov 20. Details on (01223-494051).

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Archive Article: 1997/11/14

14 November 1997

James Hosking

James Hosking farms 516ha

(1275 acres) with his

parents and brother at

Fentongollan, Tresillian,

Truro, Cornwall. Land is

equally split between share

farming, various FBTs and a

tenancy. Crops include

wheat, oats, barley and

daffodils, alongside sheep

and cattle enterprises

I IMAGINE I am not alone in beginning each new season with a little prayer in the hope that the weather will let us get through it as early as possible.

Here at Fentongollan we have a mixed farm. If one operation gets delayed it has a knock-on effect on the timing of the next.

At this time of year arable life is dominated by autumn drilling. We managed to get off to a good start at the beginning October. I would have preferred late September but we had to finish planting daffodils and get the grass established.

Early drilling in Cornwall can cause problems not only with our greatest fear, BYDV, but with crops getting too far advanced in a mild winter, too. The dry spell in the second half of September has done a lot to help dry out our wet fields, a legacy of nearly 200mm (8in) of rain in August.

We establish our cereals with a plough and furrow press, and drill with a power harrow combination. I try to start with some ground ploughed ahead of the drill. When the drill caught the plough up this autumn, the weather had turned and by keeping them close together we were able to keep going on all but the few wettest days.

I replaced our 10-year-old Amazone drill with the companys new RPD drill and power harrow this year. We have been thrilled with both its use and the end result. The ability to change power harrow tines by just removing a linchpin brought plenty of smiles all round.

All the cereals are drilled at 350 seeds a sq m. I have kept the same varieties as last season – Reaper, Hussar and Brigadier for the wheat, Fanfare for the barley and Solva for the oats. I would have liked to split the oat varieties, but could find no Gerald seed, apparently due to poor germination. Other varieties available are too susceptible to crown rust for our conditions. &#42

Daffodils are just one of the many crops James Hosking looks after at Fentongollan near Truro, Cornwall.

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Archive Article: 1997/11/14

14 November 1997

REG HARMER is retired now but still lives in the centuries old farmhouse in which he was born, in the market square in Alfriston, Sussex. His son now runs the 48ha (120-acre) farm on which he keeps a suckler herd, and Reg enjoys some support from RABI.

While the war thwarted his musical ambitions and his fathers illness obliged him to return to the family farm on demobilisation, Reg has been a lifelong musician.

He was a founder member of the Eastbourne Symphony Orchestra and a regular player with the Eastbourne Orchestral Society for 44 years. He is often called upon to play with musical groups and attends two musical rehearsals a week. So it is not surprising that he chose Straw in My Fiddle as the title for the autobiography he recently completed and for which he seeks a publisher.

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