Archive Article: 1998/04/03 - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £129
Saving £36
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Archive Article: 1998/04/03

3 April 1998

Last load for this milk year at Peter Colebrooks Leyfield Farm, Surrey, where feeding milk to calves has reduced super-levy risk. National March output is at quota – a £33m bill is likely.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1998/04/03

3 April 1998

Mystery surrounds the origin of this horse-drawn muck spreader which is one of the newest exhibits at John Sturdys Eden Farm Insight at Old Malton, North Yorks. Mr Sturdy believes the chain-driven spreader may have been made in America early this century. He would welcome any information readers may be able to supply before the fully restored spreader goes on public display at the farms vintage working day on Apr 19. Mr Sturdy can be contacted on 01653-692093.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1998/04/03

3 April 1998

The heavy duty buck rake range from Glos-based Albutt is for use with telescopic loaders, loading shovels and high powered tractors. The four-model range offers capacities from three to five cubic metres. Albutt points out that pushing grass off a buck rake avoids shaking the fork and reduces wear on pivot points significantly. Prices start at £2153.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1998/04/03

3 April 1998

Three 1.82-2.03m (6-6.7in) beds can be formed with this creation from Doncaster-based Jones Engineering. Clearly aimed at the large acreage potato grower, the unit comprises four deep ridging bodies fitted behind the companys triple hydraulic folding bed tiller. Power requirement is 140hp and its transport width is 3m (9.8ft); list price is £25,000.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1998/04/03

3 April 1998

FERRAGS Optima sugar beet drill is one of eight machines entered in British Sugars latest drill performance tests being carried out at Franks Brothers Manor Farm, Helpston, near Peterborough. Funded by the home-grown sugar beet research and education fund, the purpose of the test is to evaluate planting accuracy with regard to sowing depth, seed spacings, the occurrence of "doubles" and uniformity of the growing crop. Test results will be available by early summer. Stanhay withdrew its drill at the 11th hour.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 1998/04/03

3 April 1998

TRIPLE rinse your sprayer tank as well as your empty pesticide packs to minimise the risks to crops and people.

That is the advice from Bill Taylor, field research co-ordinator for sprayer manufacturer Hardi International.

Freshwater flushing tanks and tank wash systems do a good job and can be retrofitted to sprayers. Using them to flush out the sprayer tank and booms in the field as soon as a job is finished means contaminated waste is not taken back to base, notes Mr Taylor.

When using sulfonyl-urea-based products adding an additive, such as all Clear Extra or Tanksafe, and following manufacturer instructions is important. But such cleaning agents could be equally useful for cleaning other pesticides and oily deposits from tank, boom, hose, filter and nozzle.

But take care not to mix ammonia-based cleaners with those containing a bleach or chlorinating agent.

"It is also important to avoid spilling undiluted product on aluminium alloys, zinc or galvanised surfaces. Using an induction filling bowl will minimise this risk," points out Mr Taylor.

"Remember, sprayer and boom contamination is not only internal – the outside fabric gets a build-up of pesticide after several jobs too. It is good practice to regularly clean the outside of the sprayer as each job is completed."

In the field, ensure an area of the last treated crop receives less than the full permitted product dose.

When spraying is finished, one-third of the flushing water and the recommended rate of cleaning agent can then be thoroughly circulated and sprayed out on the crop.

Another third can then be introduced, circulated and sprayed out. Lastly, the last third is used to wash down the sprayer, booms and rear of the tractor – using a dedicated sprayer hose with a long handled car wash brush or a flushing flat fan spray lance. &#42

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus