Archive Article: 1998/04/10 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

Forget the weather, the

daffodils and the arrival of

Easter, eggs and all – theres

no surer sign that spring has

sprung than the onset of lamb

shows at auction marts. The

first kicked off last week and

FW called in at Ashbourne,

Derbys to see what was what…

Right: Judge Howard Ferneyhough sets to work. Hes been in the judging hot-seat before at Ashbourne, both at Easter and at the Christmas primestock event. Trouble with competitions is that there can only be one winner. "You end up making one good friend and 50 enemies," laughs Mr Ferneyhough.

Not being an early-lamb producing area, this was the first time this year that new-season lambs had been seen at the venue. A far cry from parts of the West County where theyve been appearing for a couple of months. The day also saw hoggets on offer. This one, however, didnt seem to know quite where it should be.

Sights like this will soon become a thing of the past, with operations at Ashbourne to be incorporated in the Bakewell auction, which opens on a new site this summer.

This spring lamb looks like its about to spring – literally. It collected the top prize and made 200p/kg. Tom Turner from Longford, Derbys, looks on proudly. Or, rather, he hangs on proudly.

Auctioneer Nigel Young (right) and Peter Oven of Bagshaws in action.

Get on there, says Adam Edwards of Stoke-on-Trent. Stock sometimes need a little gentle persuasion to get it on the truck. Not sure what the plastic sack is for, though!

The hogget season is drawing to a close. And as it does, so there is a big range in values, says Mr Young. The best are still averaging over the 100p/kg-mark, but the bottom end are in the 70ps. But all sheep are worth less than 12 months ago. "Like beef, wheat, milk and just about everything else we grow or breed," as one farmer said.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

Taking the Keep Britain Farming message to the top of the world, Hants farmers Peter Momber (left) and Peter Kirby left the UK this week for a 29-day trek in the Himalayas. They hope to plant their placard at the summit of the 6481m (21,264ft) Mera Peak.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

Grower Wilf de Gruchy makes a head start with Jersey potatoes, a week ahead of usual. A big crop is expected, but the British Potato Council believes supermarkets, which buy 80% of Jerseys crop, will shift 12,000-15,000t by Aprils end. A quicker lift will reduce output to 50,000t, 14% below last year. That bodes well for mainland earlies in early May, as does poorer quality old crop. End of Feb stocks, at 2.52m tonnes, were slightly down on last year. Average price is now £88.48/t, 58% higher.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

Correction

THIS years Sprays and Sprayers event is on June 30 and July 1 – not as stated last week.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

&#8226 RECORD breaking and charity fund raising will be the order of the day on Sunday (Apr 12), when the Meat and Livestock Commission attempts to break the world record for the biggest meat pie.

Ingredients will include 12,000lb of British beef steak, 3000lb of kidney, and more than a dozen barrels of bitter. The event, at Hand Stadium, Clevedon, Bristol, will be overseen by weights and measures officials to verify the record. The 60,000 portions from the 11t pie will be sold on behalf of the Clevedon Cottage Hospital charity.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

&#8226 VISITORS to the countryside during the Easter break have been reminded by the Farmers Union of Wales that lambing is in full flight and that dogs should be kept on leads.

A spokesman said the union had received increasing complaints about dogs attacking sheep, particularly in south Wales. The public should be aware that farmers were perfectly within their rights to shoot any dogs caught worrying sheep and lambs.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

Top models in Niemeyers 98 season rotary rake range marketed by Opico are equipped with a twin-tine system – shorter front tines collect about 70% of the crop while the more flexible and longer trailing tines sweep up the remainder of the crop. For transport, a pivoting headstock turns the rake through 90í avoiding the need to remove tine arms. Price of the Niemeyer 8-model range starts at £2560 for the 3.4m working width RS340-D with the 8.4m Twin 850-VS retailing at £14,650.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

Grain handling kit goes to Astwells


MANUFACTURING and marketing of Rutherfords range of grain handling equipment is now in the hands of Kettering-based Astwell Augers.

The move follows an agreement between Rutherfords receivers and Astwell Augers.

Products include conveyors, elevators, deawners, stone separators and grain cleaners which complement Astwells augers, grain silos and aeration equipment.

MANUFACTURING and marketing of Rutherfords range of grain handling equipment is now in the hands of Kettering-based Astwell Augers.

The move follows an agreement between Rutherfords receivers and Astwell Augers.

Products include conveyors, elevators, deawners, stone separators and grain cleaners which complement Astwells augers, grain silos and aeration equipment.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

&#8226 RENDERERS and animal feed manufacturers will start giving evidence to the BSE inquiry from Mon, Apr 27.

Initially the committee will be looking at the processes used in these industries, and any changes that occurred, during the period from 1975 to the end of 1986.

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Archive Article: 1998/04/10

10 April 1998

IDENTIFYING the best time of day to apply different pesticides is an imprecise science, but practical experience does give some pointers, says Mike May of IACR Brooms Barn, Suffolk.

"Weather tends to be calm early in the morning, often with high humidity and dew on the plants. For some herbicides and desiccation work this can be an advantage. But avoid this timing if rain is forecast," says Mr May.

Care should also be taken when applying products in the evening if an overnight frost is likely. And remember early season temperature at crop level is usually 2-5C (3.6-9F) lower than the screen temperature. Similarly, even in the early months of the year, the direct sun temperature can easily exceed 30C (86F) the following day.

Scorch risk

"The risk of scorch increases in the midday sun, although some try to turn this to their advantage by spraying with a reduced dose," comments Mr May. But temperatures over 20C (68F) can reduce the selectivity of herbicides, especially in crops like sugar beet where crop loss can be significant.

"We are finding in trials that there can be losses even when scorch is not very evident," he adds.

Timing may also be important when considering sequential applications. Product labels say which tank mixes should not be used and what interval should be left between potentially antagonistic products, such as some graminicides and broad-leaved herbicides, or with adverse soil or weather.

Less obvious is the situation where a residual herbicide has been applied to sugar beet in dry conditions and a follow up herbicide spray used. If rain comes both become active and the crop can be hit with a damaging "double whammy".

"On the other hand, with manganese, it has been found that weed control is good if it is applied before or with a herbicide, but applying it after the herbicide can help some weeds grow away," comments Mr May. &#42

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