Archive Article: 1998/05/15 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1998/05/15

15 May 1998

3. Wheats still unsprayed

Again the high levels of disease already present rule out any thoughts of strobilurin fungicides, says Mr Metcalfe. Even with the addition of a clean-up triazole the full benefits would not be forthcoming, he explains.

"Crops have got to be clean right the way through the season to get full advantage from them. It would also be too costly to go through with a full-rate triazole at £12/acre and a strob at £15.

The only sensible tactics for untreated fields is to get on as soon as possible with a full-rate triazole in a water volume high enough to get good crop penetration, he says. "But I am worried about the amount of disease and whether we shall be able to contain it if we get a wet summer."

In second wheats Opus, rather than Folicur, is his preferred option, mainly for its effect on eyespot. Even at this late stage he believes it provides some useful protection against the disease.

NO PREVIOUS FUNGICIDE

&#8226 Full-rate triazole asap.

&#8226 High water volume.

&#8226 Strob benefits limited & too costly.

Dont delay

Do not delay the flag leaf spray this season even if T1 sprays were delayed, urges BASF.

Septoria pressure is the highest BASF business development manager John Peck says he has ever known. "Yield potential is good, but the problem is what is conducive to high yield is also conducive to high disease," he says. "You cannot afford to take risks with the flag-leaf."

Septoria is present on leaves but may not be visible yet as the latent period of the disease was extended by the cold weather, believes trials manager Stuart Godding.

They advise a full-rate flag-leaf spray as soon as the leaf is out. "You cannot assume a three-quarter rate triazole applied at GS 33 will last to ear emergence."

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Archive Article: 1998/05/15

15 May 1998

Question

I AM trying to work out the seasonal labour requirements for growing forage maize (like that shown in the Farm Management Pocket Book by John Nix for winter cereals). Can you help ?

Responses

John Morgan, Director of Operations, Maize Growers Association

Answer

Unfortunately, there are no exact figures available for seasonal labour requirements for growing forage maize because over 95% of growers tend to use contractors.

However, the labour/machinery requirements for growing the crop are as follows:

April Plough, power harrow cultivate once or twice
April/MayPrecision drill
May/JuneSpray once, probably twice, for weed control
Sept/OctHarvest using a forage harvester and ensile

The costings for these operations are fairly standard and should be available in the John Nix book.

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Archive Article: 1998/05/15

15 May 1998

Sprayers moved into rape earlier this week as warm weather and mid/ late flowering coincided to raise the risk of disease infection. Here Richard Hartley of Manor Farm, Milton-under-Wychwood, Burford, Oxon applies half-rate Folicur and mbc to Synergy to control botrytis and sclerotinia. According to ADAS, lower pod set and fill is good, even where Easter frosts struck, and seed weevils were rare at the beginning of the week. A pyrethroid spray should only be used where more than two adult weevils can be found on a plant, or one a plant if the spray is going on with a fungicide or pod midge is expected, it advises.

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Archive Article: 1998/05/15

15 May 1998

FOOTBATHING…

BARRIER Hygiene suppliers of Fungicidal Hoof and Foot Bath can be contacted on (01953-456363) not as stated last week in New Products. The fax number is correct.

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Archive Article: 1998/05/15

15 May 1998

Peas please… A change of heart at Wephurst Park Farm, Wisborough Green, West Sussex, sees farmers weeklys southern barometer Patrick Godwin drilling more Eiffel peas rather than forage maize. Ample supplies of grass are the main reason the rest of the crop, sown about six weeks ago, is already 10-13cm (4-5in) high. An ideal seed-bed after power-harrowing of weathered ploughing has given the late sown crop a good start.

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Archive Article: 1998/05/15

15 May 1998

Warter Estate held its annual auction of store cattle last

week. The estate is well known, recently coming onto the

market as one of the biggest commercial units ever offered

in this country. So if youve got a spare £30m… Those at

the auction, however, had more immediate concerns – like

getting their hands on some cattle…

Warter Estate held its annual auction of store cattle last

week. The estate is well known, recently coming onto the

market as one of the biggest commercial units ever offered

in this country. So if youve got a spare £30m… Those at

the auction, however, had more immediate concerns – like

getting their hands on some cattle…

Warter Estate held its annual auction of store cattle last

week. The estate is well known, recently coming onto the

market as one of the biggest commercial units ever offered

in this country. So if youve got a spare £30m… Those at

the auction, however, had more immediate concerns – like

getting their hands on some cattle…

Left: Board stiff? Not likely, with this much to do. Les Taylor sets to work, ensuring everyone was going in the right direction.Above: Brian Atkinson lent a helping hand, too.

On offer at Manor Farm, East Yorks were 500 mainly Charolais cross animals, raised on high Wold land from Simmental cross suckler cows.

"Pleasantly surprised," said auctioneer Michael Harrison in response to bidding. With averages up on last year, there is, he said, still confidence in the beef trade. "Its the time of year when people are looking for cattle to turn out to graze. Grass has to be eaten, after all."

Above: No, not the Norwich kit, but the sale uniform of the Cundalls staff, seen here busy in the office with the paperwork.

Left: One of the main topics of conversation around the auction ring was the future of the estate, since it went on to the market this spring. Its available either as a whole or in lots. If you bought it lock, stock and barrel, you would get, among other things, nearly 12,000 acres, 61 dwellings and a

well-known shoot. The price tag is £30m-plus. Keep doing the lottery…

Steers on green and blue CIDs topped at £590 and £545 respectively, while heifers made to £402. Prices at on-farm offerings like this tend to be higher than those seen at weekly marts, say the auctioneers.

Average prices


£/head

Steers (green CID) 498

Steers (blue CID) 471

Heifers 348

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