Archive Article: 1998/06/05 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1998/06/05

5 June 1998

The courtyard garden section was divided into

two parts this year. Those from garden

clubs, societies and local authorities were

staged outside as usual. Those from colleges

were created within the Great Marquee

Here Brinsbury (top) and Newton Rigg (right) received gold awards; Aylesbury, Berkshire and Writtle were awarded silver gilt flora awards and Norwood Hall School, Ealing College a silver flora.

Brinsbury College is a regular exhibitor at Chelsea and took An explorers garden as its theme this year. Newton Rigg was represented at Chelsea for the first time, said student Jill Alcock. She and fellow 2nd year HND student Vera Turnbull had visited the 1997 Chelsea Show and "went home totally motivated," Jill said. The result was Lakeland reflected: Stone and slate, mosses and plants of the area, a dark, dark pool reflecting a 5ft high urn, a delightful study in dry stone walling.

A cosmic garden (left) was the theme developed by Norwood students, based on patterns and structures observed in the universe. Writtles garden (above) was entitled Scotch on the Rocks. A bottle of scotch was piped in on press day to launch a garden which picked up the colours of the tartans sported by designer Janet Johnston and her piper husband Keir.

Above:

Part of A quarry mans garden, created for Nationalk Butterfly Gardening year. Habitat management is gardening on a

large scale its creators.

Above:

A world of their own… a

playhouse from The Childrens Cottage Co. Below: Part of Whichford Potterys stand promoting its classic English terracotta flowerpots.

This sculpture peered from a wall of British Sky Broadcastings The Private Chapel Garden (silver gilt flora medal). Part man, part beast with arms comfortably folded it appeared to be intent on serious talk.

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Archive Article: 1998/06/05

5 June 1998

ALL across the country farmers are responding to farmers weeklys "Just Say No" campaign, opposing government plans to levy an environmental tax on pesticides and fertiliser inputs.

Have you given the campaign your full backing? If the thought of paying 125% duty on every pack of pesticide and every bag of fertiliser fills you with dread fill in and return our coupon on page 57.

Our aim is to convince government, and environment minister Michael Meacher in particular, that this tax is unfair, unscientific and unjustified.

Trying to reduce the environmental impact of inputs by taxing them out of the farmers reach is a crude, short-sighted strategy. There is little to suggest it would benefit the environment, yet it would do untold damage to UK agriculture.

Responses from farmers, advisers and input suppliers alike will be equally welcome to show this government how wide of the mark it is with its enviro-tax plans.

Responses to our "Just Say No" campaign will be presented to Mr Meacher in early July.

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Archive Article: 1998/06/05

5 June 1998

Emperor Akahito of Japan relaxed on a private tour of Wells Farm, Little Milton, Oxon, last weekend after the controversy surrounding his formal visit to the UK. The Emperor, a keen birdwatcher and conservationist, was shown a reinstated apple orchard, a Black Poplar tree area and a wildflower meadow at the farm owned and run by the local Wildlife Trust for Berks, Bucks and Oxon.

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Archive Article: 1998/06/05

5 June 1998

ALL across the country farmers are responding to our "Just Say No" campaign, opposing government plans to levy an environmental tax on pesticides and fertiliser inputs.

Have you given the campaign your full backing too? If the thought of paying 125% duty on every pack of pesticide and every bag of fertiliser fills you with dread, complete the coupon below.

Our aim is to convince government, and environment minister Michael Meacher , in particular, that this tax is unfair, unscientific and unjustified.

Trying to reduce the environmental impact of inputs by taxing them out of the farmers reach is a crude, short sighted strategy. There is little to suggest it would benefit the environment, yet it would do untold damage to UK agriculture.

Responses from farmers, advisers and input suppliers alike will be equally welcome to show this government how wide of the mark it is with its enviro-tax plans.

Responses to our "Just say No" campaign will be presented to Mr Meacher in early July.

Dear Mr Meacher,

I object strongly to your plans to impose an environmental tax on pesticide and fertiliser inputs.

I believe it would do untold harm to UK farming and bring very little benefit for the environment.

I urge you to reconsider these plans.

Signed: ……………………………………..

Name: ………………………………………

Address:……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

SEND TO: FARMERS WEEKLY, "Just Say No" Campaign, Quadrant House, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5AS or Fax to: 0181-652-4005.

OR

Bring you coupon along to the FARMERS WEEKLY stand at Cereals 98.

ENDS.256.WORDS.

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Archive Article: 1998/06/05

5 June 1998

Simon Wadlow

Simon Wadlow farms 200ha

(500 acres) at The Croft,

near Bridgnorth, Shropshire.

Key crops are winter wheat

and sugar beet, plus winter

oats, barley, oilseed rape

and beans. Forage maize,

set-aside and pasture make

up the balance

WHEN I wrote Aprils diary we had just started sowing sugar beet.

The weather was kind and we completed the job without interruption. All fields needed two power harrow passes and one had to have three to achieve a reasonable seed-bed.

All seed was Gaucho (imidacloprid) treated, which was just as well as aphids are present on untreated crops and so pressure has been taken off the sprayer. Varieties are Zulu, Madison and Madrid. Spacing was 19cm in 50cm rows and for the first time for many years a pre-emergent herbicide has not been used.

After sowing a small amount of fodder beet for neighbours we turned our attention to forage maize. Since it is after stubble turnips grazed by sheep, it had not been possible to prepare the field at all.

With a hired muck spreader we soon had a liberal dose of fym spread over the entire 12ha (30 acres). Compaction was evident so we went over the whole field with the flat lift. After ploughing and two passes with the power harrow all was ready for the contractor to sow.

As last year we are growing two varieties, Calypso and Janna, in alternate rows so that if they are not at the same stage of maturity at harvest they will be mixed together. Seed rate was 105,000/ha and Gesaprim (atrazine) pre-emergence herbicide was applied at 2 litres/ha. Not sown until May 15 the crop was nearly fully emerged in seven days and is growing well.

I recently joined the Maize Growers Association and on its advice I shall reduce the amount of nitrogen applied this year (the saving will more than pay for the subscription).

Our set-aside follows sugar beet where the tops were grazed, so there was no green cover. To create some and give a fertility boost we have planted mustard at 8kg/ha (7lb/acre) at a cost of £11/ha (£4.45/acre).

Three weeks after drilling the beet was sprayed with Betanal Progress (desmedipham + ethofumesate + phenmedipham)/ Goltix (metamitron) at 1 litre/ha/ 1.25kg/ha. After good germination it is making a valiant attempt to catch up its earlier sown rivals. &#42

Confidence that post-emergence treatments would suffice meant Simon Wadlows sprayer has not been required for pre-emergence beet spraying this spring.

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Archive Article: 1998/06/05

5 June 1998

REDUCE the effects microbes such as E coli and coccidiosis can have on stock health using Biosuper disinfectant in housing and on bedding, says UK supplier Harbro Farm Sales.

The disinfectant is said to be suitable for use in pig, poultry, cattle and sheep housing. Harbro recommends its use to reduce spread of diseases such as E coli, coccidiosis, dysentery, mastitis, joint-ill, watery mouth, diarrhoea and lameness.

Biosuper is supplied as a dry powder, so it can also be spread on bedding, slats or floors to soak up moisture and neutralise odours, it adds.

Cost is £17.50 for a 25kg bag (01888-568882, fax 01888-563939).

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Archive Article: 1998/06/05

5 June 1998

Attending agricultural shows is as much a part of summer

for a lot of farmers as climbing on the combine or stacking

straw. The season kicked off last month and, for those of

you still to attend your favourite event, heres a glimpse of

the action so far to get you in the mood. A whistle-stop tour

of Nottinghamshire, Shropshire, Ulster and Devon…

The line up of Jacobs… It wasnt just stock that was well represented at Newark – this was a day when the machinery trade turned out in force with 26 stands present, more than five times the number seen a year ago.

Judging the Jerseys at the Notts show at Newark which, taking place on May 1-2, was one of the first of the year. A taste of things to come.

Hold on tight… W S C Richardss° bull, Lowerhope 1 Napolean, scoops the Hereford breed title at the Shropshire and Mid West on May 15-16 at Shrewsbury. On a bright sunny day, Caroline Davies needed the shades.

Straight from the horses mouth…Hollybank Lorna Doon,

S J Brizells four-year-old mare, takes the Clydesdale championship at Balmoral – again.

No, not the Babe impersonation contest… but the pig classes at the Royal Ulster Show at Balmoral on May 13-15. The livestock classes here attracted more than 2000 entries.

Collecting the honours in the Highland Class at the Shropshire and Mid West, meanwhile, was G G Hedges Tessa 1st of the Kiln. The quality of cattle in the beef classes at Shrewsbury was high, said Alan Fotheringham, who travelled all the way from Perth to judge them.

A grand ram… taking the sheep interbreed championship at the Devon County show on May 21-23 was Robert Wattss Texel ram.

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