Archive Article: 1998/08/28 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1998/08/28

28 August 1998

A crowd of about 300 gathered outside Totnes Magistrates Court in Devon this week to support two environmental activists charged with ripping up genetically modified (GM) crops. Elizabeth Snook and Jacklyn Sheedy pleaded not guilty to causing £605,000-worth of damage to an area of experimental genetically-modified maize at Hood Barton Farm, earlier this month. The women were bailed to appear again in court on Nov 17.

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Archive Article: 1998/08/28

28 August 1998

Converts to magnotherapy… Hants vet Roger Meacock (left) used magnetic boots as a last resort on the cow pictured when it was suffering E.coli mastitis and milk fever. Antibiotics had failed to work, says herdsman Phillip Coombes, Park Farm, Beaulieu, and Mr Meacock tried the boots in a last ditch effort to save the cow. She was up within 24 hours and hasnt looked back since. The magnetic field created by the boots apparently improve the circulation, reducing tissue damage, pain and inflammation. Mr Meacock believes the boots will make a significant improvement to the survival chances of downer cows. For more information, contact him at PO Box 142, Hythe, SO45 5YX.

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Archive Article: 1998/08/28

28 August 1998

According to the old saying, lambs need to be roasted twice – once when alive and once when they are dead. Sunshine, however, has been rare in parts of the country this year, leaving big numbers of lambs on farm. But dont delay marketing in the hope of a price rise, warns the Meat and Livestock Commission.

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Archive Article: 1998/08/28

28 August 1998

The drill on autumn grass establishment… drilling grass seed rather than broadcasting should help improve establishment of this four year ley at Shannas Farm, Peterhead, Aberdeenshire. Drilling grass seed also means that tramlines can be inserted, improving accuracy when applying fertiliser and making cutting for silage easier, reducing risk of having to cut only small areas. The grazing mix, which includes white clover, is being drilled at about 33kg/ha (30lb/acre) and will be grazed in spring by the farms young pedigree bulls.

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Archive Article: 1998/08/28

28 August 1998

Wondering whether or not you should be worried by the Millennium Bug? Then youll be pleased to see part two of our feature on the subject. This week were looking at embedded chips. Not the sort you find on the floor in disreputable cafes but the sort that perform clock or date-related duties in some items of farm equipment, notably electronic feeding and ventilation controllers.

The gist of it is dont panic; only a small percentage of farm machines are affected and a bit of time on the phone to suppliers of potentially affected equipment should establish whether theres a problem and how

big it is.

We also kick off the

1998 Barclays/FW farm inventions competition this week. Weve upped the total prize money to £3600 and a tie-up with the Chartered Institute of Patent Agents means theres help for anyone wondering whether they should patent their device.

Closing date is Oct 9, so grab a few minutes to fill in the coupon between combining, corn carting, baling, ploughing, harrowing, drilling

etc etc.

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