Archive Article: 1999/04/02 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1999/04/02

2 April 1999

A break in the weather allowed Justin Stock, farm manager at Castlemaine Hop Farm, Horsmonden, Kent, to start planting 4 acres of Goldings hops last weekend. The variety, prized by brewers for over 100 years, is still in demand. The first crop, due in 18 months, will be sold on contract through hop merchant Lupofresh to real ale brewers, including Shepherd Neame and Fullers. Although 25% lower yielding than more modern varieties, aroma hops like Goldings can be worth up to three times as much, fetching up to £290 a zentner (50kg).

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Archive Article: 1999/04/02

2 April 1999

Mixed fortunes…this could be the last year a 6ha (15-acre) field of Fortune and mixed daffodils is seen at David Hills, Home Farm, Merton, Norfolk, because he cannot compete with growing competition from the south-west. Mr Hill – pictured with his son Lawrie – says that a climate change favours growers in the south-west.

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Archive Article: 1999/04/02

2 April 1999

CORRECTION

AN award of £48,000 made to National Polytunnels, near Barnard Castle, Co Durham (Business, Mar 12) was made through the Farm Diversification Initiative, a partnership led by North Yorks County Council based at Northallerton, in Teesdale, and not as stated. It was financed by Objective 5b money.

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Archive Article: 1999/04/02

2 April 1999

A whey the lads to world cup glory…cheese-making is adding value to dairy production for Gwynfor and Thelma Adams, and theyre hoping for success with their new rugby ball shaped cheese to commemorate the 1999 World Cup in Wales. They began making specialist cheese, called Caws Cenarth, to boost income and service borrowings at Glyniethinog Farm, Boncath, Ceredigion, Wales, when dairy quotas were introduced. It now generates more net income than their 70 cows.

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Archive Article: 1999/04/02

2 April 1999

Conference quotes

Quotes from the Hammond Lecture, by Philip James, Rowett Research Institute, Aberdeen.

l"Britain is the experimental centre for the world in terms of food safety and it is now safer to eat meat produced in Britain than any part of Europe."

l"One BSE infected animal could put 250,000 consumers at risk depending on how infective a dose of BSE is."

l"BSE is not over yet, as the Europeans have not taken it on board… It could become endemic and may be a long-standing issue especially as there is a 10% maternal transmission rate."

l"We are bound to have a series of E coli epidemics because of environmental contamination, and the solutions are not obvious."

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Archive Article: 1999/04/02

2 April 1999

Knight Farm Machinery now has a sprayer wash-down kit, to enable machines to be cleaned in the field, in accordance with the new Groundwater Regulations.

Under the regulations, effective as of the beginning of this month, rinsings may be applied to a part of the crop that has not received its full approved dose and the outside of sprayers may be washed down within the crop area – sprayers may not be washed out or rinsed down in the farmyard without the authorisation of the Environment Agency.

Knights kit comprises a dedicated 12v diaphragm pump to draw water from the sprayers clean water tank, 20m of hose reel and a lance with brush.

Price of £559 includes a mounting bracket for retro-fitting on farm.

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Archive Article: 1999/04/02

2 April 1999

Conference quotes

"Farmers should realise theyre producing food, and not just rearing livestock."

John Pratt, MLC vet

"We havent actively used removal of antibiotic growth promoters from pig diets in marketing yet, but we may in future."

Niels Kjeldsen,

Danish pig specialist

"Im not sure many consumers know what schemes assure. We transfer our assumptions onto consumers, and assume its sorted."

John Pratt, MLC vet

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Archive Article: 1999/04/02

2 April 1999

IT is important to be prepared for unexpected leaks or spills in store, during transport or in the field.

The storage protocol used by BASIS-registered stores is a good example for farmers to follow, since it is in line with Green Code requirements, notes BASIS technical executive officer, Rob Simpson.

"They must have suitable personal protective equipment, a large fluid retaining vessel for leakers, inert containment material such as sand – not sawdust – a brush and shovel, and heavy duty plastic bags to put contaminated material in. And most important, labels are needed to identify the contents of the bags and containers."

When tackling a spill or leak assess the product hazard and decide what ppe is required, he advises. Then control liquid spills by ringing them with absorbent material and in-filling to soak up the liquid.

Shovel the contaminated absorbent into a heavy duty plastic bag or container and label it. Powdered products must be swept up and bagged with care to avoid creating a dust. "A respirator is usually essential," advises Mr Simpson.

When transporting chemicals to the field secure them carefully and avoid punctures by ensuring there are no nails in the trailer floor. Never take packs in the tractor cab.

When filling the sprayer, work on a flat surface, open packs as they are needed and when using part packs, fill the measuring jug in an open container so any spill can be washed into the sprayer. A large half drum under the induction hopper can be used to catch any accidental spillage.

If you spill product on the soil, dig out the contaminated soil, bag it and get it collected by an authorised specialist waste contractor. Never wash spills in, especially near ground or surface water. &#42

MANAGINGSPILLS

&#8226 Keep absorbent material, brush & shovel at hand.

&#8226 Keep a supply of heavy duty bags.

&#8226 Readily available ppe is needed.

&#8226 Label contaminated material and store it in a bunded area.

&#8226 Get authorised specialist waste contractor to collect.

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