Archive Article: 1999/07/09 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1999/07/09

9 July 1999

Angela Barton, chairman of the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institute, willingly accepts a cheque for £9150 from Richard Burge, chief executive of the Countryside Alliance. The money was raised by the alliances team that ran the London Marathon and will be used to help fund the RABI helpline.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/09

9 July 1999

Tony Pexton, NFU deputy president, joined 10-year-old Maggie Morgan to launch the unions new-look internet education site. Illustrative pages that answer questions for younger children, such as how butter is made and where wool comes from, complement the more detailed farm profiles pitched at GCSE and A level students.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/09

9 July 1999

One stop-off in Prince Andrews tour of the show on Monday was the Young Farmers Club stand. As well as viewing displays from clubs around the country, the Prince was told about the YFCs "Putting the Young Back into Farming Campaign". Members collected thousands of signatures on a petition that will be handed to the government later this year.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/09

9 July 1999

Quiet please, were trying to eat… Cows at the British Grassland Society paddock grazing demonstration, where BGS consultant Carol Gibson and Sussex farm manager Christian Fox were on hand to discuss improving grassland production and use. Ms Gibson explained that grazing a new paddock each day gave cows longer grass to eat, so intakes are higher. And keeping them off yesterdays paddock encourages better regrowth. Mr Fox added that paddock grazing reduces labour requirement, because it saves feeding silage and takes less time to bring cows in. But both admitted its better to set up paddocks with electric fencing than to move wires every day.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/09

9 July 1999

To buy or not to buy? Arable farmers were warned to resist impulse buying of shiny, new machinery on display at the Royal Show. ADASs Julian Hayes said many producers could still make better use of existing machinery and should invest in specific kit, perhaps second-hand, only to improve efficiency. Major investments, although often justified, needed to be supported by a full business appraisal. Growers should aim to keep labour and machinery costs below £240/ha (£97/acre), he said.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/09

9 July 1999

Latest addition to Marshalls line up includes a livestock float in cow colours. The float can be fitted to trailers in sizes of 6.3m (21ft), 7.5m (25ft) and 8.4m (28ft). Key features include a non-slip durabar steel floor and internal castor-fitted partitions for easier opening and closing. Prices are £3400, £4000 and £4750 respectively.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/09

9 July 1999

Maternal bliss? Not so, according to the RSPCA. It has banned producers joining its Freedom Foods scheme from using farrowing crates, and Tesco is considering following suit for new buildings even before the end of research it is part-funding. Full report and industry reaction p44.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/09

9 July 1999

To cater for the growing popularity in 20m tramline systems, John Deere has introduced a 6.6m (22ft) version of the existing 740A mulch drill (3 x 6.6 = 19.8). The new model together with the original 6m and 8m versions, have also been fitted with track eradicators to remove tractor and drill wheelings.

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