Archive Article: 1999/07/16 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 1999/07/16

16 July 1999

Fifty, not out… farmers weeklys north-east correspondent, and cricket enthusiast, Alan Barker (right) receives a commemorative plate to mark his 50 years of reporting the Great Yorkshire Show from Christopher Hall, honorary show director. Alan, who began work with farmers weekly in 1956, will be taking well-earned retirement later this summer.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/16

16 July 1999

Graeme Cock cutting some of the 105ha (260 acres) of second cut silage at Younghouse Farm, Ashburton, Devon. First cut grass silage mixed with maize is already being buffer fed to the 400-cow summer calving herd. Mr Cock says 170 of the cows have calved since June 1 and with a return to three times a day milking he confesses to being "really quite busy".

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Archive Article: 1999/07/16

16 July 1999

Iwan Thomas, 400m athletics champion, joined pupils from Kingshurst School, Birmingham, to help the National Dairy Council promote milk at last weeks Royal Show. The NDC hopes that a £10m a year national milk advertising campaign could soon be a reality, with dairy farmers to be polled on their views later this year (see page 8).

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Archive Article: 1999/07/16

16 July 1999

Classic Cats…about 30 classic Caterpillar tractors subsoiled, ploughed and cultivated 50 acres of Holbeach Fen at the weekend. The event was held at Barrington House Farm and organised by Long Sutton and District Agricultural Society with the Antique Caterpillar Machinery Owners Club of Great Britain. Pictured (right) is a freshly painted 1937 D7 pulling a 5-furrow Ransomes plough.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/16

16 July 1999

Harvesting 300 tonnes of peas a day at Leaden Hall Farm, Holbeach Marsh, Lincs, got underway last week. With 2307ha (5000 acres) of peas to lift, five pea-viners swung into action on the unit, which is run by Holbeach Marsh Co-operative – the largest pea producer in the country.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/16

16 July 1999

Echium, an extremely attractive alternative crop, is being grown by Ian Howard of Rawhall Farm, Beetley, Norfolk. Merchants Gorham and Bateson say Echium is a low input crop which can be used for new and emerging markets in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/16

16 July 1999

Junior farm minister Elliot Morley holds a white clawed crayfish, one of a number of rare species of aquatic wildlife in the higher reaches of the River Derwent in Yorks. The minister was officially launching an EU Objective 5b project aimed at improving the river and its water quality for the benefit of wildlife and for its social and economic value. The three year project, which includes the environmental management of adjoining land through management agreements has been in operation for a year. Beneficial effects on native aquatic species such as brown trout, grayling and white clawed crayfish are already apparent.

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Archive Article: 1999/07/16

16 July 1999

ADEQUATE soil moisture combined with high temperatures has led to high grass growth rates in most dairying areas during the past few weeks, writes BGS grazing consultant Paul Bird.

Autumn calving herds are mostly dry or drying off and should be grazing tightly to improve grass quality for optimum milk production in September and October.

Some spring calving herds are producing 16 to 20 litres from grass in mid-lactation, without any concentrates. Reproductive performance has been on target, with the well managed spring calving herds achieving 58% to 70% non-return rates.

If rain falls again, as forecast, surplus grass will continue to accumulate. When the average cover increases to 2300-2400kg of DM/ha, remove the longest grass from the grazing rotation and either cut it or store it, deferring grazing until later if you expect to be short of grass in the next month.

Calving, AI and calf rearing are coming to end with spring calving cows. There should, therefore, soon be some time to finish off cows tracks, water troughs and electric fencing ready for next spring.

Calves are the most valuable class of stock on farm and must be kept growing throughout summer by moving them on to fresh grass regularly. &#42

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