Archive Article: 2001/06/22 - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £129
Saving £36
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

Big Brothers… Tony (left), Terry (centre) and Kenneth Hancock receive their long service awards at the East of England Show, Peterborough, Cambs. The brothers have clocked up 127 years service between them working for the Martin family of Whittlesey, near Peterborough. Kenneth started in 1956, followed by Terry in 1958 and Tony in 1961.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

Despite a slow start, collection centres are gaining momentum (see p29). Cornish producers made use of Truro market this week. Peter Burton (right) of St Columb, unloads Devon and Cornwall Longwool ewes. Auctioneer Jim Large (centre) and Penzance farmer Sam Kyte assist.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

Record crowds turned out for the first live auctions in over four months in the Republic of Ireland after the foot-and-mouth outbreak. At this sale of 120 lots at Maynooth, Co Kildare, prices were stronger than in February, said auctioneer John Doyle. One lot of 500kg Charollais stores, with one subsidy claim left, went for Ir£680 (£530) apiece. Farm leaders welcomed the return to relative normality.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

&#8226 GROWERS could reap long-term benefits from a campaign to boost peoples health by encouraging them to eat more fruit and vegetables, Tesco claims. The retailer is launching the campaign with the Imperial Cancer Research Fund, which says there is evidence eating fruit and vegetables reduces the risk of cancer. Tesco marketing director Tim Mason said there is huge scope for expanding demand.

&#8226 THE National Trust has appointed George Dunn, chief executive of the Tenant Farmers Association, as a member of its properties committee. The appointment is a personal one but Mr Dunn says that he hopes it will cement the relationship between the Trust and the TFA.

&#8226 THE efforts of Lady Caroline Cranbrook and farmer Robert Kennard to save Britains small abattoirs have been recognised by the BBCs Food Programme which has awarded them its Campaigner Award. Lady Cranbrook, who farms in Suffolk, said the continuation of small abattoirs was even more imp-ortant in the light of current debates on the future of agriculture. &#42

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

EVER since we arrived at the farm in 1983, I have been doing the wages for the farm staff. It was a little complicated at first because I had never done it before and everything was in French!

With training in the hands of Mr Dufresnes office staff, however, I learned which

official books I needed and how to fill them in. I had to take one to the county town hall to have it officially stamped by the mayor, and each month I diligently filled in the tiny squares with all the details of hours, deductions one by one and the net salary paid. It looked very neat and proper.

Last summer, with a stab of guilt, I fished it out of the drawer as Id been meaning to do for a long time and

discovered that it was two years behind.

So, the first part of my

holidays was spent bringing it back up to date –

a very long-winded affair.

Never mind, ever conscious that the Inspector du Travail could call any time and demand to see the books,

I felt so much better when everything was back in order again. Even more so when four weeks ago we got a letter from the MSAO saying that le Contrôleur, Mr Lecoq would be coming to check our books, and could we please have all

relevant details to hand for inspection.

This panicked me a little because, at about the same time, I received another letter from the MSAO saying that I wasnt completing the

quarterly declaration form in the right way!

We have to pay the wages from which we make a

deduction of 19.74% which counts as the employees

contribution for retirement, sickness benefit etc. But every three months, we receive a bill for 41.35% of the basic salary which is the employers

contribution towards

retirement, sickness benefit and training schemes, works doctor etc (all employees have a medical once a year to confirm that they are fit to do the work theyre employed for. I have to have one as a teacher, so far Im still noted as "apte"!)

Mr Lecoq duly arrived and started going through the books.

"Now dont worry, it isnt because youre doing things wrong, its just to check youre up to date with the rates and procedures. Now, have you got this? And that? Work contracts, daily hour records signed by everyone each month, yes fine."

"And the book?" I asked.

"Which book?"

"This one, stamped by the mayor," I said, handing it over.

"Oh, we stopped doing that two years ago."

"No one told me." I was a

little annoyed.

No comment was made about the number of hours Jacques does a month. Next year we have to go onto the 35 hours a week scheme. Now how can you reason the logic behind that?

Jacques wont want to take a drop in wages, he is quite happy to do an average 198 hours a month. We are happy to pay him but he will have to stop.

If we need more help, we will have to pay someone else; if he wants to maintain his wage, it is suggested that he finds a

second job!

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

The winner of Farmlifes Cheese Please competition is Mel Sanders of Higher Landazzard Farm, Liskeard, Cornwall. Her prize is a three-day cheese-making course with the Cheddar Gorge Cheese Company. Here, the companys Tony Rich and Sarah Constable are seen with portions of their 56lb cheddar with chives truckle, which scooped first place at the recent World Cheese Championships. The truckle has been donated to Save the Children and wedges from it will be used at charity fundraising events throughout the summer.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

Vogel & Noots line-up of ploughs now includes a new range – the XS range. Designed, says the company, for use with tractors up to 260hp, the range offers models in four to six-furrows. Options include use of either manual or hydraulic width adjustment and a choice of leg protection systems. The manufacturer has also chosen the XS ploughs to introduce its latest steel hardening system for the mouldboards – Permanit Carbon Plus – which is claimed to reduce wear rate significantly. Price of a five-furrow version starts at £17,100.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

More than half of the January-born Suffolk ram lambs of Writtle Colleges Lordship flock have muscle depths greater than 40mm. The Essex colleges Colm Flanagan says one lamb reached 94kg with 47mm of muscle in 21 weeks, the highest in the Suffolk Sire Reference Scheme. The 50-ewe flock was set up seven years ago to demonstrate the rate of genetic progress in the breed.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

Amazone has updated its 1500 litre capacity FPS and FRS front hoppers units for use with the AS rear mounted seeders. There is now a simplified seed metering drive from the hydraulically raised and lowered landwheel and use is made of a new Vario single range gearbox which can apply seed rates from 2-400kg/ha. The FPS unit (pictured) is carried on three steering tyre packers and the FRS is carried on the front of the tractor.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

Lelys new automatic calf feeder – the Lely Calm unit – is available in two models. The system machine (SM) can be linked to the computerised management system used in the companys Astronaut robotic milking unit. This allows recording and monitoring of individual animal performance.The stand alone (SA) unit is designed to control the calf rearing process completely independently and, says Lely, can be located in any type of cow shed.In both unit types, calves are allowed access to feed 24 hours/day with the feeder being automatically cleaned at 12-hour intervals.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

FARMERS WEEKLY wants to say a big thank you to everyone who has donated money and given help and support to those in need following the foot-and-mouth outbreak.

Money contributed to the emergency funds is throwing a lifeline to many families. Every penny really does make a difference. People have also rallied round to support farmers with acts of kindness, offers of support and resources.

Frank and Anne Rolinson raised £1000 for the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Ins-titution by organising a charity dinner with a difference – it was a "virtual" event. Such a gathering didnt run the risk of spreading foot-and-mouth, say the Rolinsons. Single, double and table tickets were sold for the event. The couple, who live at Hepworth, Norfolk, say the idea was based on similar events held in Australia to raise money for fire and flood victims.

Jazz promoter and producer Héloise Osborne sent £10 to the RABI. "I am not remotely involved in anything rural but I, along with probably millions of other people throughout the UK, feel desperately sorry for the farmers who are having to cope with this dreadful disease and all its consequences," says Héloise.

Judy Finch of Bridgend, Mid-Glamorgan, gave £30 to RABI. "I wish I could make it more," she says. "I am a towny – need pavements and street lights and know I couldnt survive in the country. However, Ive spent many breaks in the British countryside and feel our recent governments have tied our farmers in red tape and not listened to them."

* Have you or someone you know put your hand in your pocket or acted in response to the current crisis? If so, let us know. Call 0208 652-4928 or e-mail tim.relf@rbi.co.uk

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/06/22

22 June 2001

A booming industry? If youre interested in a career in agriculture or the land-based industries, then check out the national sixth-form conference at Harper Adams, Shropshire, on July 9-10. The event, supported by farmers weekly, features speakers and advisers from academic life, the careers service and industry. Pictured is one of the sessions at last years event giving would-be students a flavour of farming jobs.

For details of the event, aimed at 16-19 year olds, call 01952 815265.

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus