Archive Article: 2001/08/17 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

A year in visits

September Variety choice, drilling date, seed rates and a review of the previous years performance are discussed.

October Crop emergence, pests and early diseases assessed.

February Nitrogen, pgr and fungicide plans laid. "With fungicides we talk in general about a programme and develop an understanding of the leeway there is during the season," says Mr Boughton.

March Timed to coincide with GS30 on wheat and barley. Fungicide strategies for specific crop situations are discussed, such as when and where to include Unix (cyprodinil) for eyespot. "We look at date of drilling, previous cropping, variety and PCR results."

Mid-May Check what is happening in the field, crop by crop. "It is the key time – early flowering on the peas, flag leaves just coming through on wheat, awns emerging on winter barley."

June Final visit to discuss ear sprays, visit the co-ops trials and identify any late season problems emerging.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Straw is short enough as it is

BOTH finalists received a special tour of the facilities at Monsantos global centre for wheat breeding, formerly the Plant Breeding Institute, Cambridge.

Focused on varieties for the UK and Europe, the centre gives the company 25% of the European market, and accounts for about half the UK wheat crop.

It takes 10 years from first cross to final marketing of a new variety, even using latest methods to speed the process. But with breeding technologies improving all the time, the company expects to be able to bring significant advances to UK growers in future.

From a starting population of 2.5m individual plants each year, breeders select from crosses intended to produce high yield, disease resistance and specific qualities matched to end market requirements, says Dr Howie.

"We are getting an increasingly better understanding of the wheat plant. This should let us move plant breeding into new dimensions and provide growers with new opportunities to add value to their businesses."

He uses demonstration plots of wheats dating from the early 1900s to show the effect of dwarfing genes in modern shorter, stiffer strawed varieties.

Other advances include more erect flag leaves which reduce shading and minimise leaf splash infections, and squarer, lax heads allowing more space for regular-sized, bold grains to develop.

Challenge winner David Hinchliffe, a former qualified seed crop inspector and licensed sampler, accepts that improvements on the scale enjoyed by his father are increasingly hard to achieve.

He does not want straw shortened much further. "You need a decent gap between the leaves and above the ground, to reduce the rain splash effect," he says.

One promising variety is a Charger cross with Blazer, having short, stiff straw and good yield. Another nearing National Listing is a Consort/Madrigal cross which looks especially useful for biscuit making. It does well in the "crunch test" for biscuit flavour, notes Dr Howie.

lSee next weeks issue for details of Mr Hinchliffes winning strategy. &#42

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Richard Knight checks the blueberries at Fair Green Farms, Middleton, Norfolk, where 3.6ha (9 acres) are grown. This is the farms fourth harvest, having being planted in 1994. Most produce is sold for pick-your-own, local shops and supermarkets for 70p-90p/kg (£1.50-£2/lb).

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Milking it…The NFU farming roadshow continues to travel around the country to promote British food and give the public an opportunity to ask questions. In Leeds, NFU West Riding county chairman Tony Garside spent time showing children how to milk a cow.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Robert Tucker sped through 20ha (50 acres) of Claire wheat earlier this week at Berkyn Manor Farms, near Slough, Berks. The crop, drilled on Sept 1, yielded a "disastrous" 5t/ha (2t/acre), says farmer Colin Rayner. But yields of Claire sown just three weeks later more than doubled, he says. He sold the crop for £76.50/t off the combine. Nationally, despite a weakening £, UK wheat prices stayed more or less unchanged midweek at about £75/t ex-farm, partly due to continuing quality concerns.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Subsidy squabbles help nobody at all

There are lies, damned lies and statistics about farm support. Washington claims that Brussels is the worlds worst offender. About 40% of EU farm income comes from subsidies, compared with just 20% in the US, it claims.

But Brussels counters that US farm spending totals $76bn shared among just 2m farmers, compared with $55bn in the EU shared among 7m farmers.

Who knows where the truth lies? What cannot be denied is that, having just agreed another $5.5bn emergency aid package, the fourth in as many years, the US has no moral authority to tell other trading blocks to spend less on farm support, while it spends more.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Videos find a niche in stock sales area

Everyone enjoys a good video. Particularly when hectic farming schedules make it difficult to catch your favourite TV programmes.

But soon more producers could be watching them for business as well as pleasure. As the suspension of conventional stock sales continues, videos are rapidly finding a new niche.

They provide a valuable opportunity, which would otherwise be denied, to see livestock before purchase.

Of course, theres no substitute for seeing animals in the flesh. But when thats impossible, arranging a video sale could be the next best option.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Unload weighbridge charges right now…

Throw out weighbridge charges. Thats one piece of cracking advice the NFU has for growers keen to make grain contracts work to their advantage. In many cases, it could save £10/load.

After years of quiet pressure on the grain trade such a bold stance from the NFU is more than welcome. Contracts exist to serve both parties, but have been used by the trade to penalise growers far too often.

The Sellers Checklist devised by the NFU, and backed by the HGCA, UKASTA and others in the grain chain, helps balance that relationship.

Well done NFU.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Composite cattle the future of British beef?

What could be more traditional than Great British beef? Theres no doubt, however, that continuing to produce British beef efficiently requires an innovative approach.

A good example is one beef breeder whos planning to attend the National Beef Associations Beef Event at the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester on Sept 14.

Conscious that suitable suckler cows are a declining breed, he is focusing on a fresh approach using composite cattle.

He is just one of a growing group of producers who recognise that sharing know-how will contribute positively to the future of the beef industry. See our Livestock Section for details.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Sign up for harvest update on the net

As one of the most uncertain wheat harvests in recent years gets into full swing, how can you stay up-to-date with the latest news?

A new e-mail newsletter from FWs internet service FARMERS WEEKLY Interactive promises to help busy arable farmers stay in touch.

Simply visit the site at www.fwi.co.uk to sign up for the free weekly arable update and the daily FWi Newsletter.

We will bring you a summary of the latest harvest news from FWis full harvest results service and a round-up of other arable news, direct to your office computer.

With prices likely to vary wildly on initial harvest estimates, what better way to monitor the latest trends? No computer yet? Then dont miss our full yield and quality reports in FW.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

No livestock markets – no competition

Junior DEFRA minister Lord Whitty says he has no agenda to finish off livestock markets. Some of his recent statements suggest otherwise. Take for example his insistence that government would prefer farmers to sell more animals deadweight than through marts.

But how will they get a fair market price without open competition? Since foot-and-mouth began processors have set prices on their own terms.

Marts bring not just price transparency; they also help move store animals from upland to lowland areas. Can the UK livestock industry survive without them?

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

FWs 4×4 show is all set for September

FARMERS WEEKLY 4×4 and Country Car Show will take place on Sept 8 and 9 at Grimsthorpe Castle, Bourne, Lincs, we are delighted to announce. Of course, full foot-and-mouth precautions will be in place.

Visitors will have a chance to test-ride the latest off-road vehicles from nearly all 4×4 manufacturers. There will also be country sports demonstrations, a specialist food marquee, fashion show and accessory and clothing stands.

So, why not enjoy a day out in the great British countryside.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

SOUTH

RAIN has put harvest on hold across the south with only odds and ends snatched since last week.

Wheat is ready with considerable amounts of winter barley and some oilseed rape still to clear.

"We have seen nothing this week," says Hampshire Grains Mike Clay. "Everything will be ready as soon as the weather lets us at it."

Wiltshire grains Nick Brown echoes that with intake 2000t behind last year, and 8000t down on 1999. "By now we expect to be seeing all crops," he says.

One grower who has cut wheat is Martin Holmes, from Molash, Kent. Early-drilled Malacca off medium-light soil near Faversham was "satisfactory" at near 10t/ha (4t/acre). But rain stopped work before they could finish the 15ha (37-acre) field and with 400ha (1000 acres) to do it is very much tip of the iceberg.

Nearby Bill Harbour still has 10ha (25 acres) of oilseed rape to clear and Malacca wheat has been ready since last week. "Maybe we should have left the rape, but then we could have lost it all in a storm." Yield, like many others, has disappointed, continuing as reported on FWi at 3t/ha (25cwt/acre).

United Oilseeds Ian Pugh puts oilseed rapes mixed performance down to ground conditions.

"There is a two-way split. Where crops have stood in water through the winter farmers have been disappointed, but it was expected. On lighter, mostly chalk downs farmers have been extremely pleased and yields have often been above average." he says. Little spring barley has been cut but more winter oats were in before the weather broke with Soufflets James Marshall reporting good yields and quality for the crop. But there is considerable winter barley still to be gathered, he adds.

"There could be as much as 40% to cut south of the M4."

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

uEU competition commissioner, Mario Monti, is to investigate the commercial activities of German supermarkets following allegations of price fixing. With five companies controlling over 90% of the German food market, supermarket power is even more concentrated than in the UK. Retail beef prices, for example, have not moved, despite this years slump in farm-gate values.

uSPAIN has lifted its unilateral ban on imports of live sheep and pigs from Northern Ireland, which it imposed when the province was granted foot-and-mouth free status in early June. Spain and the Republic of Ireland were the only two EU countries maintaining a ban, the latter lifted its ban last week.

uPOLAND has extended its ban on imports of pigs and pig products from Spain and Germany to cover the whole of the EU, plus a further 11 European countries. The original ban was in response to outbreaks of classical swine fever in Spain and Germany, but recent floods in Poland have put the country on an even higher state of disease alert.

uFARMERS in Wales have less than three weeks to apply for the Tir Gofal agri-environment scheme. The Countryside Council for Wales has warned that the application period will close on Aug 31. To help farmers who are interested in signing up, the CCW is inviting farmers and landowners from north-east Wales to attend one of three seminars being held locally. &#42

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Recorded facts vital in ram purchasing

Buying rams could be a lottery this autumn without the traditional sales. But help is at hand.

Many farms have performance-recorded stock to help select the best genetics. Most breeds also have a Sire Referencing Scheme providing a comparison of genetic merit between flocks.

Buying rams based on those figures has long been recommended. Such information will be particularly valuable this year when stock have to be bought unseen or from photos and videos.

Estimated Breeding Values may be no guarantee of good looks. But, with careful selection, progeny should be faster growing and have better conformation.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Report your harvest progress & win £500

Fancy a £500 boost to harvest income? Then submit a progress report to our Harvest Hotline, which is already providing the industrys only definitive region-by-region report of harvest progress across the nation.

Our aim is to keep you up to date, with comprehensive reports in FARMERS WEEKLY each week and on FWi, every day.

Send us a comment by phone, fax or e-mail. It could win you a £500 cheque. See page 54.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

FSAirresponsible to stir up sheep scare

Theres nothing like scant evidence and ill-informed comment to ignite a food scare. Take for example the recent Food Standards Agency statement speculating about the existence of BSE in sheep.

So why did the agency stir the Press into a frenzy and jeopardise efforts to re-ignite the lamb market on such scant evidence?

Even the scientist leading the research acknowledges that it is nowhere near completion.

After the BSE information blackout up to 1996, perhaps fear now drives it to speculate on even hypothetical risk rather than stand accused of holding anything back. But for whose benefit?

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Wheat drilling can be victim of weather

Catchy harvest weather could hit growers who want to sow wheat promptly to avoid a repeat of last years drilling debacle.

Good conditions earlier mean plenty of barley and rape has been cleared and seed should be readily available. But many wheat growers have still to begin cutting.

Whether quality or early supply will be jeopardised is too early to tell. But beware if you rely on bought-in certified or farm-saved seed from a mobile operator. Securing supplies now could pay.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Ensure your kids are safe on the farm

Do you know where your children are playing? Are they safe?

If the answer is No, whats the guarantee your family can avoid joining the 44 families who have lost a child in farm-related accidents in the past 10 years?

Kids can and should be taught about farm safety. But they forget. Their minds wander easily. They cant anticipate danger.

So its parents who are responsible for what their children do and where they do it. Yes, there are a million and one demands on your time when youre farming, but safety cannot be overlooked.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

On your bike… Employees of Barclays raised more than £15,000 for the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution with a sponsored bike ride. The cyclists, most of whom work in the banks Agricultural team, covered 120 miles finishing in Kendal. The money was raised by donations by the cyclists customers and friends, local firms and with a matching £ for £ donation by Barclays.

Border Fine Arts raised £11,000 for the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution and Royal Scottish Agricultural Benevolent Institution. The money was raised by a charity auction for two of its rarest limited edition figurines.

The successful bidder for both pieces was Ian Sinclair, proprietor of the The Posthorn shop in Castle Douglas.

Ian (left) is seen here with Border Fine Arts master sculptor Ray Ayres.

Flower power… The horticultural and business skills of youngsters from a

Hull school have helped boost a

foot-and-mouth emergency help fund. Pupils from the Sir Henry Cooper School produced and sold plants, hanging baskets and vegetables raising £269 for the Farmers Fund run by Yorkshire Agricultural Society. Here, Bill Cowling, chairman of the societys grants and education committee, is seen with Toni Trigg.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Sandwich crop between cereals

Richard Brown has grown sunflowers in Cambridgeshire since 1986. This year he has 63ha (156 acres) at Hill Farm, Keyston near Huntingdon.

"The crop slots in as a sunflower sandwich between cereals on chalky boulder clay to allow me to maximise first wheat opportunities," he says. "I grow four varieties, Antonil, Sanluca, Bahia and Aria, for birdseed. Yield averages 16-18cwt/acre, or just over 2t/ha, but I hope to achieve 2.3t this year. I have combined 2.5t/ha in four of the 16 years I have grown sunflowers."

Most of Hill Farms wheat is drilled before the crop is combined and last years weather-delayed sunflowers were not cut until late October. He hopes never to see such a late and difficult season again.

"Sunflowers have a low input requirement. Seed at £100/ha is the biggest single cost. This year I applied just 60kg/ha of nitrogen and no agchems. I used a tractor hoe to keep weeds down. The gross margin is the highest of all the spring alternatives."

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Kind-hearted students and staff at Harper Adams University College have raised almost £3000 for the ARC-Addington Fund, which helps those suffering hardship in the wake of foot-and-mouth. Reverend Gordon Gatward recently stopped off at the Shropshire college to collect the three cheques for the Addington Fund. RAG Activities (Raising And Giving) staged by students raised the lions share of the cash, with money also collected from the sale of green ribbons for Rogation Sunday and from the Staff Revue.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

uTHE government is proposing to introduce more flexibility into the Farm Woodland Premium Scheme. Aid is normally restricted to 200ha (495 acres) of all land types or 40ha of unimproved land, but DEFRA now proposes to allow individuals who put in multiple applications to exceed these limits. Farmers who put in single applications will still have to comply.

uRURAL affairs minister Alun Michael has revealed that the government will continue to match fund donations to charities helping rural communities hit by foot-and-mouth until September. The government will also contribute another £400,000 to pay for the Rural Stress Action Plan to be extended from primarily agricultural-based initiatives to rural communities.

uDEFRA has been accused of failing to communicate its decisions satisfactorily. A spokesman from the the Country Land and Business Associations north-west regional office said the public were better informed during the Gulf War than they are about foot-and-mouth in Cumbria. Poor communication was adding to the stress in rural communities. &#42

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

THE WINNERS of the Julip competition have now been picked. Each of our six lucky winners will be sent a lovely horse gift set from Julip, who have been making 1/12th size models for more than 55 years.

The following people answered correctly that the name of Tornados rider is Tasha: E Powell, Clee Downton, Shropshire; Jack Archer, Milton, Derbys; Megan Vickers, Canterbury, Kent; Katherine Bruce, Aberdeen; Lilymay Wilkins, Abbermead, Glos; Sophie Clemitshaw, Norwich.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Latest product on offer from Belgian manufacturer Joskin is this Trans-Ex trailer range which is available in 3-6t capacities. Fitted with 400mm foldable side panels, the trailers can be increased in capacity with the addition of 200mm to 400m extensions. The trailers chassis is equipped with closed profile beams designed to give more rigidity to the entire structure. Prices for the trailers vary from £850 to £3000.

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

Farmers weekly wants to say a big thank you to everyone who has donated money and given help and support to those in need after the foot-and-mouth outbreak.

Money contributed to the emergency funds is throwing a lifeline to many families. Every penny really does make a difference. People have also rallied round to support farmers, with acts of kindness offers of support and resources.

People involved with Allendale Fair, which was cancelled this year due to foot-and-mouth, raised £1000 for the Royal Agricultural Ben-evolent Institution holding pub karoake nights. Commit-tee member of the Fair, Margaret Stonehouse, says there were two aims – to generate trade for village pubs hit by F&M and to raise cash for charity. As for the standard of the singing? "Mixed!"

Myerscough College students raised £1000 for the Arthur Rank Centre Addington Fund with rag week events. Money-raising activities included sales of rag mags and a fancy-dress gate collection, with money also given to local charities. Many of those at the Lancashire College have been directly and indirectly affected by foot-and-mouth, says principal John Moveley. "The students wanted to do something to help."

Brian Bostock, Roger Beesley and Jimmy Smith raised £2260 for the ARC Addington Fund holding a lunch party at Yardley Hastings, Northants. The event was well-supported, particularly by those involved in the ancillary industries, says retired farm manager Brian. "Everyone went home with a smile on their face, except those who had had too much to drink and did not want to leave the bar."

Richard and Rachel Griffin of Upper Wardington, Banbury, organised a Plough-mans Supper and auction at their local village hall, raising £3302 for the RABI and Farm Crisis Network.

Have you or someone you know put your hand in your pocket or acted in response to the current crisis? If so, let us know. Call 0208-652 4928 or e-mail tim.relf@rbi.co.uk

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Archive Article: 2001/08/17

17 August 2001

August is hectic for us

cooks as we make the

most of the abundance

of fruit and vegetables,

writes Philippa Vine.

Cool dishes and light

meals are the focus of

our recipes this month

I LIKE to use locally produced ingredients where possible and these include peppers (capsicums), and even halloumi cheese, which I discovered at my local Farmers Market.

The cheese is made by Sussex High Weald from pasteurised sheeps milk and if you fry it, the taste is similar to bacon. It makes a wonderful warm salad. When I used this cheese in the Masterchef "Cook Off" one of the judges was so impressed that she insisted her London restaurant stock it.

August sunshine will have ripened tomatoes to make them fragrant and flavoursome and I only eat them in season. They are delicious on their own, in salads, roasted in the oven and can be frozen to use later in a winter stew or soup.

Another result of the August sunshine can be hot and bothered children (and parents!) and one thing that will cool them down is an ice lolly. Make your own to ensure they are free of extra sugar, artifical colorings and sweeteners. I was prompted to include a baby-food recipe this month after a friend of mine asked me about ideas for feeding her eight-month-old baby. I chose a dish that included summer vegetables which my own daughter Louisiana loved when she first started to eat proper meals.

The pastry for my savoury tart this month has a "hidden" ingredient to give it crispness – polenta. This is a coarse ground maize, yellow in colour and is available in good grocery shops.

Fruity ice lollies

Ice lolly moulds are cheap to buy and available in most grocery shops. Simply pour the chosen mixture into the mould and freeze until set. To prevent pulling the sticks out minus the lollies, run the moulds under hot water and leave for a minute or two before serving.

Frozen berry:

Simmer strawberries and/or raspberries with a little water and sugar to taste for a few minutes, until just soft, then pass the mixture through a sieve and mix with some blackcurrant juice.

Raspberry ripple:

Make a raspberry purée from fresh raspberries and a little sieved sugar and swirl this into whole-milk plain yogurt.

You can also buy fruit smoothies as drinks in shops (only choose the ones that are made with high fruit content) and use these to make excellent ice lollies.

Parcels of cheese with onion marmalade

This recipe is perfect for barbecues and not just for non-meat eaters. The onion marmalade keeps well in the fridge for three to four days and can be served as a relish with all sorts of dishes or sandwiches. These parcels can be prepared in advance and stored in the fridge.

1 packet of halloumi cheese

3 tablespoons of olive oil

2 garlic cloves, crushed

1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary

1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme

Black pepper

For the onion marmalade

4 tablespoon olive oil

2 medium red onions, finely chopped

1 tablespoon soft brown sugar

100ml (31/2fl oz) red wine vinegar or sherry

Pinch of ground cumin

Cut the halloumi cheese into four equal squares and place in a large shallow dish in one layer. Pour over the oil, scatter the garlic and herbs on top and black pepper. Cover and leave to marinate in the fridge for at least 4 hours or over night. Meanwhile, get on with making the onion marmalade, heat the oil over a low heat, add the onions and cook slowly for 10-15 minutes until soft and tender. Stir in the remaining ingredients and cook slowly for a further 30 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions become soft and syrupy. Remove from the heat and set aside.

Remove the cheese from the marinade. Lay four pieces of foil, each about 25cm (10in) square out on a table. Divide the onion mixture between each square (you may have some left over). Top each with a slice of the cheese and pour over the marinade equally. Bring the corners of the foil together and fold the top over to make a parcel. Place the parcels on a hot barbecue and cook for 5 minutes until the cheese just begins to soften.

Simply for babies – chicken with summer vegetables

I think it is important to make the effort to prepare home-made dishes for babies. Apart from being more economical, the nutritional value is far greater. Also, now that their taste buds are forming you can introduce fresh herbs.

Makes eight portions.

150g (5oz) rice

600ml (20fl oz) chicken stock, ideally home-made

150g (5oz) chicken breast, cut into pieces

50g (2oz) a mixture of peas and sweet corn

50g (2oz) green beans, chopped

50g (2oz) carrots, scrubbed and sliced

200ml (6fl oz) apple juice

Basil and parsley to taste

Cook the rice in the stock. When the rice is half-cooked, add the remaining ingredients and pour over the apple juice. Continue to cook until the rice is soft and the vegetables are tender. Do add more stock as needed and then using a food processor, blend to the desired consistency. This makes a large batch so extra portions can be frozen in ice cubes trays for later use.

Roasted pepper, mint an

This recipe has been adapted from a recipe that my mother-in-law kindly passed to me. It is good for using up left-over Stilton and surplus home-grown tomatoes. Delicious served with ciabatta to soak up all the wonderful juices, this is a quick lunch or supper dish for two.

6 tomatoes

110g (4oz) Stilton cheese

Plenty of black pepper and a little salt (remember that Stilton is fairly salty)

2 cloves of garlic, crushed (optional)

Pre-heat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas mark 6. Slice the tomatoes very thinly. Arrange a layer of tomatoes together with crushed garlic in individual dishes, season with black pepper then crumble over half of the Stilton cheese and top with remaining sliced tomatoes and crushed garlic then finally put the stilton on the top. Bake in oven for about 10 minutes or until the cheese has just started to melt. Serve with warm ciabatta or good wholemeal bread to dunk into the wonderful juices.

Sues layered tomatoes

This recipe has been adapted from a recipe that my mother-in-law kindly passed to me. It is good for using up left-over Stilton and surplus home-grown tomatoes. Delicious served with ciabatta to soak up all the wonderful juices, this is a quick lunch or supper dish for two.

6 tomatoes

110g (4oz) Stilton cheese

Plenty of black pepper and a little salt (remember that Stilton is fairly salty)

2 cloves of garlic, crushed (optional)

Pre-heat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas mark 6. Slice the tomatoes very thinly. Arrange a layer of tomatoes together with crushed garlic in individual dishes, season with black pepper then crumble over half of the Stilton cheese and top with remaining sliced tomatoes and crushed garlic then finally put the stilton on the top. Bake in oven for about 10 minutes or until the cheese has just started to melt. Serve with warm ciabatta or good wholemeal bread to dunk into the wonderful juices.

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