Archive Article: 2001/11/09 - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £133
Saving £46
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

OSR men on a roll

Oilseed rape growers in Yorks are set to roll crops to control canopy development.

"It is really an extension of HGCA-funded work, which shows that mowing forward rape crops has yield benefits," says Hull-based independent agronomist Simon Senior.

"It does the same job as mowing or grazing with livestock, but uses equipment most growers have on farm." Two years ago it worked well.

"We found it was also a useful way of controlling runch and charlock; the rolling bruises the weeds, which lets the frost kill them." &#42

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

GRAIN CLINIC

The NFU is offering a free grain testing clinic. Bring along a minimum of 2kg and have your grain tested in a purpose-built laboratory at the event.

GRAIN CLINIC

The NFU is offering a free grain testing clinic. Bring along a minimum of 2kg and have your grain tested in a purpose-built laboratory at the event.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

Uplifting stuff… workers hard at work picking Cara potatoes at E W Bell & Cos Wingland Grange Farm, Walpole Cross Keys on the Norfolk/Lincolnshire border. Brothers Roger and Peter Bell grow about 40ha (100 acres) of non-irrigated potatoes on their 416ha (1030 acres) unit. The potatoes go into cold-store and then are sold for pre-pack trade.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

Walk on my big beauties…Annie Williams from Poundsgate on Dartmoor with horses Gemma and Captain takes part in a ploughing match under blue skies last weekend organised by the Cornish Heavy Horse Society at the National Trusts Pill Farm at Trelissick, near Truro.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

John Duncan helps harvest grapes from 5470 Pinot Noir vines at Denbies – Englands largest vineyard in Surrey. Harvesting started in the second week of October and will continue until mid-November. About 400,000 bottles of wine are produced every year on the North Downs from over 300,000 vines spread across 265 acres (107ha).

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

November and still combining in Surrey! Bad weather dragged out harvest of May-sown Chariot barley on heavy Weald clay at Burstow Park Farm, South Nutfield. For tenant Jim Nicholson and combine driver Kevin Wels the straw will be almost as welcome as the grain. For the first time Mr Nicholson has had to buy in as much as 80% of his 150-cow dairy herds needs.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

Harnessed up for action…Cambs producer Graham Robinson fits a raddle harness to his Charollais ram before turning him out with two Suffolk rams and 100 Suffolk cross ewes. Tupping has been delayed by three weeks this autumn so that ewes lamb after the first week of April, says Mr Robinson. This means grass will be more plentiful around lambing allowing purchased feed costs to be reduced.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

Beet factory delays need sorting out fast

Watching early-lifted beet respire sugar content away and even start rotting in the heap is very demoralising for growers. Delayed deliveries cut income and slow further lifting, with a knock-on effect for late-sown cereals.

So why cant British Sugar get its state-of-the-art Wissington factory working properly?

Since the start of the campaign it has blamed filtration problems, caused by under-sized crystals, for delays. Earlier this week the beet backlog stood at 10 days.

Nobody likes to call for compensation. But if British Sugar is preventing growers from delivering beet, because its own factory is having problems, surely it should compensate growers for their losses?

Come to Grain 2001 for top information

Keen to make the most of your grain marketing, storage and handling? Then make a beeline for Grain 2001, the national technical event at the National Agricultural College, Stoneleigh, Warks, on Wed and Thur, Nov 21 and 22.

Alongside all the latest equipment to help you handle and store grain more effectively, there will be a host of experts to help fine tune your system to meet the needs of modern grain buyers.

Growing quality crops at least cost is only half the battle. Fail to store and market them well and you could miss out on significant profits.

So why not visit Grain 2001? It could help maximise the profitability of the crops youve already grown.

Internet chat can give valuable advice

Low milk fats? Lame cows? Housing problems? Wouldnt it be useful if, instead of occasionally guessing solutions you could phone a friend?

Growing numbers of producers have been doing just that – or rather its cyberspace equivalent. Using internet chat rooms, to draw on a wealth of experience from other producers and consultants, is becoming more popular.

Foot-and-mouth has provided the incentive for this, the ultimate in bio-secure communication. But, as increasingly time-pressed producers find it more difficult to attend off-farm meetings, chat rooms could provide a valuable role in enabling them to keep up with the latest. So smile both when you dial and when you log on.

Dont fritter away our farm trade expertise

Jacks-of-all-trades and masters of many. What better description of the skills required by modern farmers and their workers? But sadly, skill, experience and knowledge are haemorrhaging from the farming industry.

So all credit to the Borders Machinery Ring. It has launched a new labour and training agency designed to create a pool of skilled workers that can be employed permanently or part-time within the machinery ring – or beyond.

UK farming needs more initiatives like this if we are to preserve the cutting edge of our agricultural expertise. Without them, we risk wasting farming knowledge gathered over generations.

FWi can be double boon for business

Want to make the most of the internet? Perhaps, stuck for an internet service provider? Then why not trust nearly 70 years of British farming expertise and put your faith in FARMERS WEEKLY/s on-line computer service FWi (www.fwi.co.uk).

We can help you cut the cost of using the internet with free internet access (excluding local telephone charges) or one of our unlimited access packages. Either way you will be able to enjoy the wealth of information at your finger tips – without needing to watch the clock.

So take advantage of what is becoming an increasingly effective business tool. For more information telephone 020 8652 4912 or email farmers.weekly@rbi.co.uk Theres no better way to put farming all the latest farming facts at your finger tips.

Weigh up your chance for a super prize

Fancy winning a set of electronic weighing equipment for your livestock this winter? Then look out for the FARMERS WEEKLY/Nuflor from Schering-Plough competition.

Taking part is easy. Read the text on the five competition pages starting this week, then answer the simple question on each page and keep the answer in a safe place.

Next, fill in all five answers on the coupon that will appear in our Dec 7 issue and send it in to us. You could win one of eight prizes of £1250-worth of Tru-Test electronic livestock weighing equipment from Ritchey Tagg. Now that is a prize that weighs up.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

CORRECTION

IN the article on a garlic-based alternative to OP insecticides for use in vegetable brassicas (Arable , Oct 26), the cost of crop covers should have been £3000/ha, giving an annual cost over five years of £600/ha, not as stated. &#42

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

Surrey dairy farmer David Nicholas (blue shirt) helped raise more than £17,000 for The Royal Marsden Hospitals childrens unit, where his daughter Annie is being treated for leukaemia. The group from Sevenoaks Rugby Club raised the money shaving off their hair and beards and here – with the money collected and his hair grown back – David helps present the cheque to a hospital representative. "Annies illness has made us focus on things other than farming over the last two years since she was diagnosed at the age of 14 months – which may have been a help and made us be more positive," says David.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2001/11/09

9 November 2001

GRAIN 2001

SEMINARS

Programme runs both days.

10.30 Growing for a market – Alastair Dickie, HGCA.

11.15 UK exports – a global outlook – Andrew Flux/Emma Jackson, British Cereal Exports.

12.00 Climate change and the future of agriculture in England and Wales – Dr Jo Hossell, ADAS.

1.30 The changing face of grain storage – Dr Ken Wildey, International Centre for Safe Commodity Storage.

2.15 A co-operatives vision for the future – Graham Lacey, trading director, Centaur Grain.

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus