Archive Article: 2002/01/18 - Farmers Weekly

Subscribe and save

Farmers Weekly from £129
Saving £36
In print AND tablet

SUBSCRIBE NOW

sub_ad_img

Archive Article: 2002/01/18

18 January 2002

Indian maker Tata has launched a high-spec, low-price commercial version of its Safari 4WD. Called the Safari Access, it costs just £9995 (ex VAT), has the firms familiar 90hp turbodiesel and a payload of 780kg. Much is being made of the equipment levels, which include air-conditioning, power steering, electric windows/mirrors and central locking. The 1.8sq m load bed has metal runners and half-height forward bulkhead. It unusually also retains its rear side doors to improve load access. Off-road capability includes pushbutton shifting from 2WD to 4WD, low-ratio box for rough terrain and a three year/60,000 mile warranty.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/01/18

18 January 2002

Mother nature…lambing has been under way since Christmas at Gary & Claire Gamblins Tapnage Farm, Wickham, Nr Fareham Hants. Ram lambs are fattened up and sold through the couples own farm shop while ewe lambs are used as replacements for their milking herd. The Gamblins also rear ostriches to sell as meat.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/01/18

18 January 2002

Milk merger is good news for producers

The proposed merger between Zenith and The Milk Group makes sense.

As one company, it will have over 4000 members supplying about 20% of the GB milk market. That will help it to return a better milk price to members.

In the short term, transport can be rationalised and costs cut. There is also the potential for more significant gains to be made through processing, by investing, and borrowing against, members capital.

Unlike most dairy processors, extra returns generated by adding value will not be creamed off by non-farming shareholders.

For some producers, the move may require a leap of faith. But, by maintaining control, while employing top executives, farmers signing up with this new European-style co-op should find it a leap worth making.

Dont penalise EUsfarms for expansion

EU enlargement to the east is a worthy political aim. But, despite assurances from Brussels that it will create commercial opportunities, it carries considerable risks.

Those are exacerbated by plans to phase in direct income aids for farmers in the candidate countries from the day they join.

Brussels also wants to direct more money to rural development measures as part of this years mid-term review of Agenda 2000, in preparation for enlargement. That also risks cutting the amount of cash going into producers pockets.

No doubt the long-term security gains of an enlarged Europe will benefit society. So the cost should be met by society as a whole, not by penalising hard-pressed farmers.

Caring fertiliser use can win you cash

Responsible fertiliser use is in everyones interest. It protects the environment, farm profits and boosts public perception of farming. So, no matter how flawed the arguments for nitrate vulnerable zones, few would deny fertilisers need using with care.

To recognise and reward those who achieve top standards, FARMERS WEEKLY and Terra Fertilisers are staging the 2002 Nitram Fertiliser Award.

Over the past seven years, the competition has highlighted best practice. Could you be this years winner? Turn to p46 for your chance to win £2000.

Like it or not NVZs are here to stay

They make most farmers fume. But nitrate vulnerable zones will become a fact of rural life for all farmers in England and Wales.

After a decade of delays over implementing the EUs nitrate in water directive, the government is about to comply with its requirements.

Fortunately, NVZ rules generally reflect best economic and environmental practice, particularly in the arable sector, as our Fertiliser Special points out. After all, why apply manure to land unfit to receive it? But farmers need urgent assurance that the government will accept a fair share of the extra costs of meeting the directive.

Expansion not always answer to woes

When profit is low, it is easy to look to expansion for a solution. Could a few more sows or cows boost output?

Sometimes it pays off, but there comes a point where it is uneconomic to expand. Perhaps when selling a full lorry load of pigs each week, or when there is too much for one person to do.

Identifying that point requires a good business plan. Then if expansion doesnt add up, it is vital to look elsewhere for that extra income. Part-time work off the farm or an added-value enterprise could make all the difference.

In celebration of British breakfast

A good breakfast: Theres no better way to start your day.

So well done to everyone taking part in farmhouse breakfast week – an initiative to celebrate great regional breakfast produce.

As Farmlife explains, this is good news for farmers because it promises to boost meat and cereal consumption. It will also help consumers appreciate local foods and better understand farmings role in the food chain.

Our country boasts a vast array of healthy and delicious breakfasts. So whether its tasty Cumberland sausages, Lincolnshire plum bread, Scottish oakcakes or Welsh bacon, why not tuck in?

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/01/18

18 January 2002

Strategy change

Fungicide strategy could be turned on its head in 2004 when Bayer hopes to launch its new "JAU" family of DMI triazole fungicides.

"It has the potential to flip what has become the norm of choosing the strob first then choosing the triazole to go with it – you could be saying use JAU and then choose which strob to go with that," says Mr Waddingham.

The company also has a new strob, code-named HEC, which should reach approval at about the same time.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/01/18

18 January 2002

Designed to work in front of a 4m wide trailed press, cultivator and drill, this Sumo Centre Pack is built to eliminate wheel marks and consolidate between tractor tyres. Available from SW Agriservices, the implement can operate behind wide or dual tyres and be fitted with hinged wing extensions for carrying up to eight wheel eradicator tines. The Sumo Centre Pack is supplied with a heavy-duty frame and costs from £1190.

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/01/18

18 January 2002

The family are here, everything is running smoothly although it is very cold. Tim is cooking hot, spicy prawns in the wok; there is a blazing fire in the lounge reflected in the dancing tinsel gift tags on the pressies around the tree. Its Christmas Eve.

The meal is very tasty and there is merry banter round the table, then Big Al catches Abis hand and theyre arm wrestling. Abi wins.

All hands to the deck on Christmas Day to get done early, but Al has a problem: a very sore arm and a displaced muscle – Abi didnt know her own strength!

Its a grey day outside but inside everything and everyone is glowing. We decide to have dinner at night for a change, after Tim has milked, so the afternoon around the tree is relaxed and fun with lots of pleasant surprises to unwrap.

After much persuasion Abi reluctantly calls her boyfriend Greg and invites him to come for dinner. Cherrys partner Fred is here, Beths boyfriend Pierre is touring Finland.

Greg is not daunted by Christmas with the Greens and even joins in with a party piece. He reads us Pam Ayress poem Oh, I wish Id looked after me teeth in his lovely French accent. He speaks little English and doesnt know what he is reading – "Sherbet Dabs? Cest quoi?"

Fred, now well used to us, tells a joke and we have several renditions of The Twelve Days of Christmas.

Its snowing and very cold on Boxing Day! Whats that? It is Nic (13) and Beth (21) already sliding down the hill on straw-filled plastic sacks. The pipes are frozen in the calf-house. The AI man arrives but he is rather dubious about getting back out again. Still, half an hour later and there is no sign of him, so it must be OK.

Al has an appointment to see the doctor at 1pm. We set off, he and I, and get just as far as the wooded part at the top of the hill before slipping and sliding to a halt. I slip and slide back down to cancel the appointment and get help. The surgery is very appreciative that I bother to call! Jacques to the rescue ploughing his way through the trees to the top of the hill then very cautiously driving the tractor down to hook on Als car and tow him up!

Whoosh? Whats that? Beth flying down the back of the house – youngstock scatter and leap over fences, dogs go bananas and Tim, coming down the road on the tractor with the feeder wagon, goes into the ditch. Much preferable to sliding off the road and over the edge as the tractor slides on the same patch of road at the top of the hill. Jacques once again to the rescue.

Snow melts. Tim takes his brother to the doctors at 6pm (to translate!). Doctor looks at his rather unattractive muscle and telephones a colleague. "Ah" she says… And it sounds like "Popeyes Ball". I have never seen that one before.

I suggest we have spinach for supper!

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/01/18

18 January 2002

Making a splash… 27 members of Axminster and Yarcombe Young Farmers plunged into ice cold water at Seaton to raise money for Devon Air Ambulance, Hospice Care and multiple sclerosis charities. More than 300 people watched their brave antics, which look set to raise more than £3500. Axminster YFC chairman Grant Pearse said: "I was worried about going in as it had snowed the night before – and, yes, the water was cold – but I actually enjoyed doing it and am looking forward to doing it next year."

    Read more on:
  • News

Archive Article: 2002/01/18

18 January 2002

This is one of the 5000-plus pictures that will be on sale at the Watercolours and Drawings Fair at Londons Park Lane Hotel between Jan 31 and Feb 3. Its called Winter Forest and is by Martin Taylor who works from a studio in an old barn in Staffordshire and often focuses on farming landscapes.

For more details of the Fair, call 01798 861815.

    Read more on:
  • News
blog comments powered by Disqus