Archive Article: 2002/04/05 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

A beautiful day and a big crowd gathered near

Great Yarmouth in Norfolk for a sale of sizeable

potato equipment and farm machinery from farming

company Progrow. FW called in to see how it went

Robert Fairey of auctioneer Brown and Co picks out the bids for the top price John Deere tractor. It was the largest of six for sale. The JD8400 with 5800 hours on the clock, made £24,900.

Potato equipment was the mainstay of the sale – a line of Grimme Combistar 1500s, which sold to a top of £15,000.

Do we or dont we? Happisburgh Farming Companys Ali Waite mulls over bidding for the six furrow Kverneland plough with his wife Denise. In the end, he was out-bid.

On the mobile and in need of a Danish – Horstead, Norfolk, farmer Nick Taylor.

Crowding over the Kverneland six-furrow plough, which took bids to £11,250.

Auctioneer Jim Major seeks bidders…Mr Major said he was pleased with the turn-out. "Buyers from all over the country made the trip to the east coast, with both dealers and farmers buying." Trade was good as well. "Its the usual thing – better quality kit maintains it value," he added.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

What does the 2002 Budget, due on Apr 17, hold in store for farmers?

farmers weekly and chartered accountant Grant Thornton are teaming up to provide analysis, which will be revealed on FWi from 8pm that evening.

Chancellor Gordon Brown has already announced several changes, including relaxation of business asset taper relief for capital gains on disposals after Apr 6, 2002.

Tax relief is also available for companies on the purchase of new quotas, and the chancellor has also introduced a new aggregates levy.

What else might be in store? Following the Chancellors speech regarding NHS funding on Mar 20, we can expect some increase in general taxation. An increase in VAT to 19% could put pressure on consumer prices, which could be passed back to producers. An increase in National Insurance would affect those with good profits, and a reduction in inheritance tax relief could be on the cards.

Find out what happens by visiting our web-site, FWi, at www.fwi.co.uk on the night. If you have yet to go on-line, call 020-8652 4903 for a free FWi CD offering free internet access, free e-mails and free web space.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Its a trial…Herts-based farmer Bob Fiddaman drilling 2 ha (5.5. acres) of genetically modified oilseed rape on his farm last week. Mr Fiddaman of Wood Farm, Piccotts End, Hemel Hempstead has grown GM rape three times before and each time felt the backlash of anti-GM activists who have damaged the crops. The field is one of 27 sites around the country used to test the effects of growing the crop.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Why doesnt UK help its young farmers?

Dont ask, dont get, is an adage that explains much about what is unfair in the supposedly single European market. A new report from EU statistics agency Eurostat on the use of Brussels funds to help young farmers is a good example.

While France paid out over k1.5bn (£922m) to 95,000 new entrants from 1990 to 1997, the UK spent nothing. The infamous Fontainebleau agreement means any such payments would be charged in part to the UK Treasury.

So the UK has never asked for this money and now faces one of the fastest ageing farm populations in Europe.

If the government insists on transferring more CAP money from direct payments to rural development, some of that cash must go urgently to help our young farmers.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Out to pasture… Buyers were keen to snap up grass kit at Woodside Farm, Yoxall, Staffs, where Peter Hart was dispersing his familys contracting fleet. A New Holland D1010 square baler (background) made £12,750 and a NH648 round baler £6550. A Kverneland TA338 trailed mower conditioner sold for £2500 and a New Holland TM165 tractor on a W plate with 1200 hours on the clock changed hands for £27,400 – close to expectations (Bagshaws).

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

CORRECTION

Small on-farm incinerators will burn up to 1t of material a day, not as stated in Livestock, Mar 22. &#42

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Since foot-and-mouth, Peter Kirkwood has begun breeding his own replacement sows for his 1000-sow herd. This involved setting up a grandparent herd of Landrace cross Duroc pigs at the East Yorks unit, says Mr Kirkwood. These are mated with Large White AI semen to produce the F1 hybrid replacements. Previously, we relied on purchasing Camborough gilts for replacements, he adds.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Pollen beetles have been flying into oilseed rape crops during recent warm weather, posing a significant threat to yield where populations top the threshold of 15 or more per plant. Check crops at green to yellow bud and apply an approved pyrethroid if the threshold is exceeded, advises ADAS. Backward and thin crops are less able to recover, so cut the threshold to an average of five beetles per plant. Tank mixing with some triazole fungicides can increase bee toxicity, so check labels and treat before flowering starts, it advises.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Do give forage costs your close attention

Do you know your forage costs? Concentrate prices are scrutinised on livestock farms, with prices hotly negotiated to secure an extra £1/t saving. But how many producers accord forage similar attention? Particularly as forage forms the major part of ruminant livestock diets.

Forage yields and costs vary each year so its good to have a start point on which to base cropping decisions. Admittedly, it means extra effort allocating costs and measuring yields. But, with meagre returns from meat and milk, choosing the most cost-effective crops should more than repay the cost of a few minutes with a calculator.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Agchem rumours a storm in a teacup

Recessions breed rumours and with agriculture in deep recession, rumours are rife within the farming industry.

The suggestion that a key potato nematicide may lose its approval mid-season is a case in point. Questions are certainly being asked – but only as part of the EUs elite Annexe 1 registration process. In no way is the products UK approval in doubt, according to the Pesticides Safety Directorate.

When times are tough it pays to check facts with those who know, before jumping to conclusions.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Cheers in order for great British meat

Fancy a pint and a steak sandwich? As eating-out becomes increasingly popular, where better to promote British meat than through pubs and restaurants?

British Meat, part of MLC, does a great job of ensuring chefs make the most of home-produced product. It runs competitions for them to show off their expertise and other promotions. The tasty dishes they create to compete in Pub Chef of the Year, Best Steak Pie of the Year and similar events keep meat dishes prominent on menus.

And they highlight quality to consumers which must be good for livestock producers. What better way to call time on dubious meat imports?

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

IACS aid on internet a great idea but…

Applying for area aid over the internet is tempting despite last years fiasco. For those equipped with a computer and the skill to use it the idea could save time and potentially costly mistakes. Provided that is problems at the Rural Payment Agency have been resolved.

What a pity the agencys PowerPoint training presentation to help growers fill in the electronic form was not available before Mar 4 and received little promotion.

Although Brussels decided not to issue the form before Mar 18, the chance of getting to grips with e-IACS before the rush of spring work could have encouraged more takers. Lets hope the system proves more reliable than last year.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Head protection is vital for ATV riders

ATVs can kill. Although not a new message, its truth was tragically confirmed recently with the death of an agricultural mechanic while testing an ATV.

The rider was fatally injured when he was thrown from an ATV. His employer subsequently pleaded guilty to failing to provide him with a helmet and to not carrying out an appropriate risk assessment.

Sadly, its a tragedy that is waiting to be repeated wherever ATV riders operate their machines without training or head protection.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

DAIRY farmers wife Sue Hammett was the only woman to get through to the finals of Pub Chef of the Year. Sue, of Tregonna Farm, Little Petherick, Cornwall was picked from 300 entrants to take part in a six chef cook-off at MLC headquarters. Her lamb noisettes won her third place.

Sue is chef and catering manager at the Pickwick Inn, St Issey, Cornwall which sources all meat and vegetables locally where possible. It runs an eight-page menu and a specials board and visitors seek out this rural pub to return for meals again and again.

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

A SMALL butchers shop tucked away in the Cotswold village of Cam, near Dursley, Gloucestershire has swept the board of prizes in a national food event.

Thirty-one-year-old Russell Robinson, who works for Cam Family Butchers, owned by Mark Carr, has become National Pork Pie Champion for 2002 at the EMTECH National Championships held at the NEC Birmingham, beating 287 competitors. As if this were not enough, he also won the Foodex Meatex National championships with his steak and kidney pies, took 3rd place with his steak and ale pies and came 4th with his creation of lamb and mint pies.

Earlier in the year Russell picked up three trophies at the Three Counties Awards for Excellence in Meat Products with Supreme awards for both his steak and ale pies and beef stroganoff.

In 1999, proprietor Mark Carr carried off the British Meat Regional Championship with his speciality sausages and won a platinum award for his pork and apricot bangers.

Asked for his recipe for success, Russell Robinson explained: "I always use good quality lean British meat, fresh herbs and the finest of ingredients – this coupled with very slow cooking has proved to be a winning formula – the customers keep coming back – so it must be right."

The shop has won so many awards in the 15 years it has been in existence, there is no longer any room on the walls to hang all their certificates. Judging by their current success rate – there will soon be more on the way!

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Archive Article: 2002/04/05

5 April 2002

Stripping for a good cause. Tractor stripping, that is! Agricultural Engineering students at Wiltshire College Lackham undertook a 24-hour charity tractor strip for Larkrise Community Farm.

The challenge – to overhaul, rebuild and refurbish the Massey Ferguson 135 –

started at 6am and was successfully completed at 5.25am the next day.

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