Archive Article: 2002/05/17 - Farmers Weekly

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Veg growers now have access to better grassweed control, thanks to new label approvals for oilseed rape graminicide Aramo (tralkoxydim), says BASFs Diane Lovesy. Now approved for use in bulb onions, leeks, cabbage, cauliflower and carrots it helps plug the gap left by the loss of residual products under the EU product review programme. For the first time growers can achieve full control of annual meadowgrass, rather than the suppression offered by existing products, she says. A new sclerotinia fungicide for use in oilseed rape is planned for 2003.

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  • News

Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Due to make its first appearance at the forthcoming Cereals 2002 event (12/13 Jun) is Opicos Rolla-Cast seeder. Comprising an eight-outlet seeder unit with a 150-litre hopper which can be mounted on to the companys 4.5m, 5.4m and 6.3m Vari-Flex rolls, the unit is designed to handle small seeds such as oilseed rape, linseed, clover and grass. Price of the Rolla-Cast seeder for fitting to 6.3m rolls is £3732.

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

A high capacity slug pellet applicator is set to debut at next months Sprays and Sprayers event. Built by Richard Stocks, the Fan Jet 28 has a 130 litre capacity hopper and a 28m spread width – the widest available from an electric drive spreader, claims the manufacturer. The applicator, which can be fitted to the front of tractors and sprayers with remote electric control from the cab, costs £629.

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  • News

Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

nn Working Plots

nn Static Trade and Demonstration Plots

nn North Clamp

nn South Clamp

nn Bale Handling and Wrapping Area

nn Muck Demonstrators

nn Skid Steer Loader Demonstrators

Case International 103

Claas UK 116

Danagri-3S 120

John Deere 108

JCB 102

Krone 117

Kuhn Farm Machinery 122

Landmec Pottinger 107

Lely 113

McCormick Tractors 115

McHale 110

New Holland 121

Opico 111

Rustons Engineering 106

Taarup (Kverneland) 101

Tanlake Farm and Machinery 109

Teagle Machinery 112

Trima 119

Valta Tractors 118

Vicon (Kverneland Group) 105

WestMac 104

Solid manure spreaders:11am and 2pm

Slurry tankers:12pm and 3pm

Muck demonstrators:

Ag-Chem UK

Fraser Manufacturing

Joskin

K-Two Sales

Reed UK

Rolland Trailers

Rustons Engineering Co

Samson International

Shelbourne Reynolds

Teagle Machinery

Tebbe UK

Harry West (Prees)

Richard Western

Farmers Guardian 443

farmers weekly/Crops 532

Farming and Wildlife 305 Advisory Group

Farming Help 514

Fibrophos 407

Fieldfare Associates 617

Fraser Manufacturing 405

Galebreaker Products 214

Genus Breeding 414

Greenoak 2000 410

William Hackett Chains 444

Harper Adams University 441 College

Harrymatic Scraper Systems 212

Health and Safety Executive 304

Hydro Agri UK 422

IAE 217

Inter-Shape (Trading) 233

Jackson Pumping Systems 236

Javelin Water Engineering 435

Joskin 202

Kemira Agriculture 320

Kraiburg-Kitt 235

KRM (Keith Rennie 434 Machinery)

K-Two Sales 203

Landia UK 213

LEAF (Linking Environment 506 and Farming)

Lynx Engineering 438

Maize Growers Association 615

Major Equipment 408

Marston Agricultural 221 Services

McArthur Group 244

McCormick Tractors 451

Milbury Systems 224

Mix it Stirrers 228

Monarch Ley Mixtures 416

James Morford 619

Moulton Engineering 431

National Association of 433 Agricultural Contractors

NC Agricultural Engineering 205

Nordic Tyres UK 448

Norvic Associates 420

Nutritech 413

Ocmis Irrigation 215

Steve Orr 440

PJ Parmiter 436

Permastore 437

RA and CE Platt 209

Primex 219

Profi International 207

Profitable Farming Co 605

Qualex 230

Quattro Products 229

Rappa fencing 442

Reed UK 225

Renault Agriculture 302

David Ritchie Implements 425

RMH (UK) 412

Rolland Trailers 404

Royal Agricultural Society 508 of England

The Royal Smithfield Show 623

Samson International 220

Seminars – sponsored by 504A Kemira Agriculture

Severn Trent Water 611

Shelbourne Reynolds 402 Engineering

Sinclair McGill 524

Singleton Agriculture 518

Slurrykat 445

Spearhead Machinery 232

Spreader Calibration 424 Services

Spreadwise 210

Strimech Engineering 234

Surface Technicians 241

Tanlake Farm and Machinery 502

Tebbe UK 243

Terrington Machinery 603

Timberland Products 439

Tramspread 204

TTMS 411

Twose of Tiverton 227

Tyco Plastics 428

UAT 528

Votex Hereford 504

Warwickshire College 238

Harry West (Prees) 222

Richard Western 223

K&K Whistance 625

Whites Concrete 211

Wynnstay Group 621

Yardscrapers UK 239

Zaga UK 447

Zero 446

ADAS 607

Ag-Chem UK 242

Agrico Engineering Sales 415

Alltech UK 522

Alo UK 245

Aventis Cropscience 510

Avoncroft Sires 231

AW Engineering 429

Bailey Trailers 450

LM Bateman 237

Bauer 206

Tony Binns Livestock 430 Equipment

Biotal 512

Bomford Turner 601

BPI Agri 405

Briggs Irrigation 415

British Grassland Society 615

British Sugar 409

Carier Pollution Control 226

Kelvin Cave 218

Cherry products 530

Chillton Agricultural Equip. 406

Country Land 613 and Business Association

Countrywide 308

Cow Comfort 432

CPB Direct 526

Dairy Farmer Supplies (Bath) 426

Dalgety Arable 516

DEFRA 505

Designation 520

DLF Perryfields 306

Ecosyl Products 418

Farmers Guardian 443

farmers weekly/Crops 532

Farming and Wildlife 305 Advisory Group

Farming Help 514

Fibrophos 407

Fieldfare Associates 617

Fraser Manufacturing 405

Galebreaker Products 214

Genus Breeding 414

Greenoak 2000 410

William Hackett Chains 444

Harper Adams University 441 College

Harrymatic Scraper Systems 212

Health and Safety Executive 304

Hydro Agri UK 422

IAE 217

Inter-Shape (Trading) 233

Jackson Pumping Systems 236

Javelin Water Engineering 435

Joskin 202

Kemira Agriculture 320

Kraiburg-Kitt 235

KRM (Keith Rennie 434 Machinery)

K-Two Sales 203

Landia UK 213

LEAF (Linking Environment 506 and Farming)

Lynx Engineering 438

Maize Growers Association 615

Major Equipment 408

Marston Agricultural 221 Services

McArthur Group 244

McCormick Tractors 451

Milbury Systems 224

Mix it Stirrers 228

Monarch Ley Mixtures 416

James Morford 619

Moulton Engineering 431

National Association of 433 Agricultural Contractors

NC Agricultural Engineering 205

Nordic Tyres UK 448

Norvic Associates 420

Nutritech 413

Ocmis Irrigation 215

Steve Orr 440

PJ Parmiter 436

Permastore 437

RA and CE Platt 209

Primex 219

Profi International 207

Profitable Farming Co 605

Qualex 230

Quattro Products 229

Rappa fencing 442

Reed UK 225

Renault Agriculture 302

David Ritchie Implements 425

RMH (UK) 412

Rolland Trailers 404

Royal Agricultural Society 508 of England

The Royal Smithfield Show 623

Samson International 220

Seminars – sponsored by 504A Kemira Agriculture

Severn Trent Water 611

Shelbourne Reynolds 402 Engineering

Sinclair McGill 524

Singleton Agriculture 518

Slurrykat 445

Spearhead Machinery 232

Spreader Calibration 424 Services

Spreadwise 210

Strimech Engineering 234

Surface Technicians 241

Tanlake Farm and Machinery 502

Tebbe UK 243

Terrington Machinery 603

Timberland Products 439

Tramspread 204

TTMS 411

Twose of Tiverton 227

Tyco Plastics 428

UAT 528

Votex Hereford 504

Warwickshire College 238

Harry West (Prees) 222

Richard Western 223

K&K Whistance 625

Whites Concrete 211

Wynnstay Group 621

Yardscrapers UK 239

Zaga UK 447

Zero 446

David Bright 318

Cebeco 319

Dow Agrosciences 311

FWAG 305

Germinal Holdings 315

IGER 313

Kemira 320

NIAB 307

Nickerson UK 312

Oliver Seeds 321

Organic Farmers & Growers 317

PDA 316

Albutt 703

Bobcat 707/708

farmers weekly 701

JCB 706

Manitou 705

North clamp

JCB 9am 10am 11am 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm

Manitou 9.20am 10.20am 11.20am 12.20pm 1.20pm 2.20pm 3.20pm

Bobcat 9.40am 10.40am 11.40am 12.40pm 1.40pm 2.40pm 3.40pm

South clamp

Claas 9am 10am 11am 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm

John Deere 9.15am 10.15am 11.15am 12.15pm 1.15pm 2.15pm 3.15pmMerlo 9.30am 10.30am 11.30am 12.30pm 1.30pm 2.30pm 3.30pm

New Holland 9.45am 10.45am 11.45am 12.45pm 1.45pm 2.45pm 3.45pm

Claas 805

John Deere 803

Merlo 802

New Holland 801

HD Sharman 804

Vaderstad 806

Ag-Bag 903

Astwell Augers 908

Broadwater Machinery 902

Browns Agricultural 906 Machinery

Traileyre 905

Volac 904

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  • News

Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Farming Connect is a one-stop shop for Welsh farmers. It is tailored to meet the needs of farming families and is designed to help farmers improve their businesses through making available a number of services.

Farm Business Development Plan

Similar to the Farm Business Advice Service available in England, this service offers up to three free days of business advice carried out by a consultant chosen by the applicant.

The service, which is split into half days, is designed to help farming families plan the future of their business. This will be carried out by considering alternative income sources on and off farm and highlighting any training or environmental issues.

Eligibility

Applicants must have an agricultural holding number, an annual labour requirement of at least 550 hours on the farm and have at least three years sets of accounts. Applicants who meet the criteria may also be eligible for one or more of the following:

&#8226 Capital grants.

&#8226 Access to a network of demonstration farms showing best practice.

&#8226 Training.

&#8226 Technical Advisory Services for agriculture, diversification and forestry.

&#8226 Transfer of new technologies/ information their own farm.

&#8226 Free advice on environment/ pollution control.

Applications

Farming Connect (0845-600 0813

Business Connect (0845-796 9798

NAWAD Divisional Offices (See last page of Part 1 for contact details).

For farmers (at least 50% of time spent in agricultural activities) who wish to submit an application for a diversification project under the Rural Enterprise Scheme (RES) one day of free planning advice worth up to £800 is available.

The advice will be carried out by a professional with at least five years experience in rural planning and will include a site visit, an appraisal report/feasibility study and site plans and sketches (not detailed technical drawings). The service does not include completion of planning application forms.

Applications

DEFRA Rural Development Service (see last page of Part 1 for contact details). A summary of the proposed diversification project is required. If successful, applicants will be informed of four professional bodies from which they can choose a consultant. Applicants must pay the consultant and then submit a claim form to DEFRA.

These grants are only available within designated Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs). Farmers in NVZs can apply for grant aid towards the improvement of waste storage and handling facilities as follows:

&#8226 40% grants on one-off investments.

&#8226 The investment must not involve an increase in the production capacity of the holding and there is an upper limit of £85,000 eligible expenditure per business.

&#8226 Expenditure grant-aided under previous schemes does not count towards this limit

&#8226 Free advice will be available to help decide on the facilities required

&#8226 Grants will be available for facilities for the separation of clean and dirty water (other than roofing) where this will reduce the need for storage.

Applications

England: DEFRA Rural Development Service (see last page of Part 1 for contact details).

Wales: NAWAD Divisional Offices (see last page of Part 1 for contact details).

Has replaced the Countryside Premium Scheme in Scotland. It is an agri-environment scheme designed to protect and manage particular habitats and landscape features to enhance the conservation interest. It is available to farmers, crofters and common grazings committees throughout the country including those in Environmentally Sensitive Areas. Agreements are for five years.

Payment rates

Option £/ha £/acre

Prescriptions predominantly for bird life 100-190 40-77

Prescriptions for species-rich areas 25-250 10-101

Prescriptions for moorland (incl stock disposal) 1-45 1-18

Wetland features 25-400 10-162

Field margins and boundaries 70-736 28-298

Prescriptions predominantly for arable areas 120-600 49- 243

Woodland and scrub 55-100 22-40

Historical and archaeological sites £80/0.25ha £80/0.6 acre

Small unit prescriptions 5-290 2-117

Capital items

One-off payments are also available for capital items, such as:

&#8226 Bracken control: Year one of a five-year eradication programme £120/ha (£49/acre)

&#8226 Erection of stock fence £3/m

&#8226 Erection of gate and posts £25/m

Reductions

&#8226 Payment rates will be reduced to 80% for agreements with:

&#8226 Areas of in-bye land greater than 100ha (250 acres).

&#8226 Rough grazings over 1000ha (2500 acres) including moorland.

&#8226 Areas of common grazings over 2000ha (5000 acres).

Applications

Local SEERAD office (see last page for contact details).

Similar to the scheme in England and Wales, it offers area payments for five years on land being converted to organic.

Eligibility

Any land not already converted to full organic production is eligible. Prior to submitting an application form land must be registered with a sector body approved by the UK Register of Organic Foods Standards (UKROFS) and a conversion plan agreed. The minimum area of land eligible is 1ha. The maximum area of land that can be entered into the scheme is 300ha of improved or AAPS eligible land or 1000ha of rough grazing.

Payment rates (£/ha)

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Total

AAPS-eligible land 150 150 50 50 40 440

Improved grassland 120 120 50 50 30 370

Unimproved grassland and rough grazing 10 10 7 5 5 37

Applications and contacts

Local SEERAD office (see last page for contact details).

.

Open to farmers/crofters and their immediate family members in the Highlands and Islands Special Transitional Programme area. Similar to the Farm Business Development Scheme, it aims to provide assistance to invest in agricultural holdings and to expand existing or new agricultural or non-agricultural diversification enterprises to generate further income for the farming family. Scheme rules are similar to the FBDS.

Application

Local SEERAD Office (see last page for contact details).

Aims to provide funds to enable farming families to create new income opportunities or to expand or improve existing diversification enterprises, either within or outside agriculture.

Eligibility

The scheme is open to farmers, partnerships and limited companies operating an agricultural business for more than two years outside the Highlands and Islands Special Transitional Programme Area. Immediate family members living on or adjacent to the agricultural unit are also eligible to apply.

Suitable projects

&#8226 Alternative agricultural production.

&#8226 Leisure, recreation and sporting facilities.

&#8226 Retailing of processed agricultural products.

&#8226 Processing of forest products.

&#8226 Conversion of redundant farm buildings to residential letting.

&#8226 Tourist accommodation and facilities.

&#8226 Rural services.

&#8226 Training.

Payment rates

The maximum grant per eligible business will be £25,000 (or £30,000 if it is part of a collaborative project).

Approved projects involving diversification outside agriculture will receive a grant towards eligible costs of up to 50%.

Projects involving agricultural diversification will receive a maximum grant of up to 50% in the LFA and 40% in non-LFA areas.

Applications

SEERAD, Room 251, Pentland House, 47 Robbs Loan, Edinburgh EH14 1TY (0131-244 6372).

Provides area payments for producers who farm at least 3ha of eligible forage land in the Scottish Less Favoured Area. Similar to the English and Welsh schemes, this land must be grazed by suckler cows or sheep. However, LFASS is also available on land grazed by dairy cows, deer, and goats or alpacas for fibre production.

Payments

Support is made up of a basic area-based payment, an environmental element and safety-net arrangements from 2001-03

Basic area-based payments will be made according to land classification. The table below shows the rates for 2002

Land classification Improved pasture Rough grazing Min stocking £/ha £/ha density LU/ha

Moorland 30.40 9.60 0.12

Southern upland 39.40 11.40 0.38

Northern upland 45.00 12.50 0.27

A further payment of £20/ha of improved pasture will be paid to producers where their stocking density is below 0.5LUs/ha or the beef cattle element accounts for 10% or more of the stocking density.

Environmental enhancements

Are available where farms are extensively grazed and include a bias towards cattle. All farms will receive a top-up of £5.50/ha for all eligible land so long as the stocking density is 0.5LUs/ha or less or the beef cattle element accounts for 10% or more of the livestock units.

Safety net

In place for three years to assist existing farmers who lose out due to the new scheme. Provided applicants eligible forage area has remained the same; for the 2001 year, claimants received at least 90% of the payment that was made under 2000 HLCAs. In 2002 this percentage will fall to 80%; and in 2003 it will be 50% of the difference between the value of the 2003 HFAS (calculated as above) and 2000 HLCAs. If the area is less, the payment will be reduced pro-rata.

The schemes available for woodlands are UK-wide and include the Woodland Grant Scheme (WGS); Farm Woodland Premium Scheme (FWPS); Woodland Improvement Grant (WIG); and Woodland Challenge Funds.

Application

There is a joint application for the WGS and FWPS. Applicants packs are available from local Forestry Conservancy Offices or from your local SEERAD Office (See last page), or from the Forestry Commission, 231 Corstorphine Road, Edinburgh EH12 7AT (0131-334 0303).

Provides grant aid for capital investments to improve the conditions under which agricultural produce is processed and marketed. The scheme is available in the Scottish Lowlands through SEERAD and in the Highlands and Islands through Highlands and Islands Enterprise and the Local Enterprise Companies.

Eligibility

The scheme is available to sole traders, partnerships, groups of producers and private or public companies that process or market primary agricultural produce. It is also open to public sector organisations where they invest in an eligible project for others to use.

All projects must be consistent with the aims and objectives of the Strategic Action Plan for the Scottish Food and Drink Industry and must address the structural and marketing difficulties that exist in the agri-food industry. Consideration will be given to projects that, for example:

&#8226 Lead to the production of new products, new markets or innovative packaging or branding.

&#8226 Involve the use of organic products.

&#8226 Increase the value derived from byproducts or waste.

&#8226 Involve products designed for export markets.

&#8226 Shorten the food chain, by linking producers with processors.

&#8226 Involve collaborative marketing.

&#8226 Will result in value being added to farm produce.

&#8226 Create or safeguards employment.

&#8226 Make a significant contribution to the local economy.

&#8226 Result in healthier foods or products.

&#8226 Increase the consumption of healthy foods and improve the Scottish diet.

Grant rates

Grants of up to 40% of the total eligible costs are available (50% in the Highland and Islands Special Transitional Area). There are no maximum or minimum project costs.

Applications

Lowland Scotland The Scottish Executive, Rural Affairs Department, Room 257, Pentland House, 47 Robbs Loan, Edinburgh EH14 1TY (0131-244 6253/6389/6388).

Highlands and Islands Rob Clarke, Highlands and Islands Enterprise, Bridge House, 20 Bridge Street, Inverness IV1 1QR (01463-244458).

There are many grants available to support crofters, crofting communities and to encourage young entrants into crofting, including:

&#8226 Building Grants and Loans (Crofters). For the erection and improvement of dwelling houses; for the provision of roads and domestic water supplies.

&#8226 Croft Entrant Scheme (CES). To financially support and encourage young crofters

&#8226 Crofting Community Development Scheme (CCDS). A variety of measures to aid crofting communities

&#8226 Crofting Counties Agricultural Grants (Scotland) Scheme (CCAGS). Grants covering a wide range of agricultural activities are available to certain people in the former Crofting Counties.

Applications

The Crofting Branch, SEERAD, Room 106, Pentland House, 47 Robbs Loan, Edinburgh EH14 1TY.

HEAD OFFICE

&#8226 Scottish Executive Environment and Rural Affairs Department, Pentland House, 47 Robbs Loan, Edinburgh, EH14 1TY. Tel: 0131 2446015. A lot of information can be found on SEERADs web-site (www.scotland.gov.uk/agri/)

LOCAL SEERAD AREA OFFICE ADDRESSES

&#8226 Ayr Russell House, King Street, Ayr KA8 0BE. Tel: 01292-610188, Email: SEERAD.Ayr@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Benbecula Balivanich, Isle of Benbecula, PA88 5LA. Tel: 01870-602346, Email: SEERAD.Benbecula@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Dumfries Government Buildings, 161 Brooms Road, Dumfries, DG1 3ES. Tel: 01387-255292, Email: SEERAD.Dumfries@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Dundee Northern College of Education Buildings, Gardyne Road, Broughty Ferry, Dundee, DD5 1PE. Tel: 01382-462840, Email: SEERAD.Dundee@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Elgin 32 Reidhaven Street, Elgin, IV30 1VE. Tel: 01343-547514, Email: SEERAD.Elgin@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Galashiels Cotgreen Road, Tweedbank, Galashiels, TD1 3SG. Tel: 01896-758333, Email: SEERAD.Galashiels@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Hamilton Cadzow Court, 3 Wellhall Road, Hamilton, ML3 9BG. Tel: 01698-281166, Email: SEERAD.Hamilton@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Inverness Longman House, 28 Longman Road, Inverness, IV1 1SF. Tel: 01463-234141, Email: SEERAD.Inverness@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Inverurie Thainstone Court, By Inverurie, Aberdeenshire, AB51 5YA. Tel: 01467-626222, Email: SEERAD.Thainstone@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Kirkwall Tankerness Lane, Kirkwall, Orkney, KW15 1AQ. Tel: 01856-875444, Email: SEERAD.Kirkwall@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Lairg Ord Croft, Lairg, Sutherland, IV27 4AZ. Tel: 01549-402167, Email: SEERAD.Lairg@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Lerwick Charlotte House, Commercial Road, Lerwick, ZE1 0HZ. Tel: 01595-695054, Email: SEERAD.Lerwick@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Oban Cameron House, Albany Street, Oban, PA34 4AE. Tel: 01631-563071, Email: SEERAD.Oban@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Perth 1 Mill Street, Perth, PH1 5HZ. Tel: 01738-443266 Email: SEERAD.Perth@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Portree Estates Office, Portree, Isle of Skye, IV51 9DH. Tel: 01478-612516, Email: SEERAD.Portree@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Stirling 2 St Ninians Road, Stirling, FK8 2HR. Tel: 01786-473272, Email: SEERAD.Stirling@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Stornoway 10 Keith Street, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS7 2QG. Tel: 01851-702392, Email: SEERAD.Stornoway@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

&#8226 Thurso Strathbeg House, Clarence Street, Thurso, VW14 7JS. Tel: 01847-893104, Email: SEERAD.Thurso@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

Under the Action Plan for Farming, Scotland has no specific schemes still open for application. Additional money has been made available under several headings and this is usually available to farmers through other schemes. These include:

Farm Business AdviceNo specific scheme for Scotland, but advice is available through Local Enterprise Companies and their small business gateways. Following foot-and-mouth, two LECS in particular – Scottish Borders and Dumfries and Galloway – have set up local schemes.

Farm Waste Grant SchemeScotland does not have a similar scheme to those available in England and Wales, although one is under consideration following the planned expansion of NVZs.

TrainingNo specific scheme, but training is available as an additional option to the FBDS and the ABDS. For training advice contact Lantra National Training Organisation Scotland, Rural Centre, West Mains, Ingliston, Newbridge, Midlothian EH28 8NZ (0131-472 4131).

Redundant Buildings Grant SchemeNo specific scheme, but again grants are available through FBDS and ABDS. Under FBDS this includes renovating buildings for residential letting (not available in England).

Marketing Development SchemeAvailable in Scotland and Wales. Introduced in 1994 to improve the marketing and commercial expertise of farmers, growers and processors (including cooperatives). Details from SEERAD, Room 259, Pentland House, 47 Robbs Loan, Edinburgh EH14 1TY (0131-244 6294/6387).

&#8226 North Wales Welsh Development Agency, Unit 7, St Asaph Business Park, St Asaph LL17 0LJ.

&#8226 South-west Wales WDA, Llys-y-Ddraig, Penllergaer Business Park, Penllergaer, Swansea, SA4 1HL.

&#8226 South-east Wales WDA, QED Centre, Treforest Industrial Estate, Treforest CF37 5YR.

&#8226 Mid Wales WDA, Ladywell House, Newtown SY16 1JB. or Y Lanfa, Trefechan, Aberystwyth SY23 1JB.

&#8226 Phone 0845-777 5577 for all of the above offices.

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  • News

Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Top tips for traceability…Anton Edelmann, executive chef of the Savoy in London, takes delivery of some English asparagus from Mark Haynes of specialist growers Bomfords of Stratford-upon-Avon. The asparagus was picked by Gregg Brown, executive chef at the London Marriott and Derek Wilkinson, farm director at Bomfords, at 6.30 am and delivered within hours to the restaurant. Mr Edelmann said: "When it comes to asparagus I readily subscribe to the buy British motto".

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Cereal crops in north-east Scotland are in fine fettle thanks to recent dry weather. Here, Optic spring barley near Todhead lighthouse gets a herbicide mix to take out mayweed, chickweed, speedwell and charlock. The crop is grown on a C1 seed contract with Saxon Agriculture and will receive a substantial premium over the feed price, says grower Angus Jacobsen, nr Montrose, Angus.

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  • News

Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

uTHE Irish government is demanding repayment of area aid from about 1000 farmers who claimed EU subsidies on ineligible land in 2001. The errors emerged after an internal audit earlier this year. Another 4000 farmers, who were sent warning letters in February, are being allowed to keep their aid money having been able to substantiate their claims.

uBRUSSELS has approved a new k30m (£19m) food aid programme for Afghanistan to help fight hunger in the region. As well as supplying food, the programme includes seed, fertiliser and tools to help local farmers get their own production up and running again.

uEURO-MPs have given strong support to EU plans to tighten up on meat hygiene rules, and called for even tougher controls on the production, sale and importation of animal products for human consumption. In particular, they are demanding better traceability and they want food processors who break hygiene rules to be publicly named and shamed.

uFRANCE has another new agriculture minister after the presidential election victory of Jacques Chirac two weeks ago. Herve Gaymard, a former civil servant, has been provisionally appointed pending parliamentary elections in June.

uEU vets have banned exports of live pigs and porcine semen, ova and embryos from areas bordering France, Germany and Luxembourg until June 30, after recent outbreaks of classical swine fever. &#42

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  • News

Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Lets make sure OSR is well supported

Oilseed production has taken a battering in recent years as cuts in area aid have undermined profitability. From July, however, those cuts come to an end, as area aid for oilseeds is paid at the same rate as for cereals.

The EU commission promised that when that happens, the Blair House restrictions on plantings will end. But the US plans to challenge that view, insisting the aid is still crop-specific and restrictions should continue to apply.

Its argument must not be allowed to prevail. Apart from the hypocrisy – the US recently boosted its own farm supports – the EU must be allowed to expand production to fill the demand for GM-free vegetable proteins. Expansion is also needed to plug the gap in the feed market after the meat-and-bonemeal ban.

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Desiree potatoes get their third blight spray of the season, 2kg/ha of Curzate (cymoxanil + mancozeb) plus Bond, at Russel Smith Farms, near Duxford, Cambs. "We had a heavy blight period at the end of last week," comments farm foreman Paul Bex. The hint of yellow on the leaves is a hangover from pre-emergence linuron and PDQ (paraquat + diquat).

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  • News

Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Grassland Event will spearhead show year

After the dearth of farm events last year, how good to look forward to a full calendar of shows.

One of the most keenly anticipated is the Grassland Event held once every three years at Stoneleigh, Warwicks.

Some aspects of the display, to be staged on May 22 and 23, will be familiar. About 170 acres of grass that will be mown, tedded, chopped, clamped, baled and wrapped.

There will be innovations too. Watch out for maize, fodder beet, kale, lucerne, sainfoin, clover and whole-crop plots and seminars on key topics.

If your farming business has anything to do with livestock or grass, why not make it your business to attend?

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

RECENT rain and warmer temperatures have produced a welcome boost to grass growth in some areas, but lack of fertiliser applications last year due to foot-and-mouth are holding back growth.

Clover swards have gone mad this week, says Wilts organic producer Christian Fox. "Growth has been boosted by rain and higher temperatures. This has come at a critical time as the herd is in the middle of its breeding season."

To maximise fertility, Robert Craig, Cumbria, is supplementing cows with about 4kg concentrates in out-of-parlour feeders to avoid excess body condition loss. Cows are yielding about 28 litres and have just started the second grazing round. &#42


Anglesey 50kg DM/ha

Cumbria 70kg DM/ha

Devon 50kg DM/ha

Dorset 75kg DM/ha

N Ireland 74kg DM/ha

Wilts (organic) 55kg DM/ha

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Club root shock for Scots oilseed men

Soil hygiene has long proved a priority for potato and sugar beet growers. But what about combinable crop producers? Over- looking the subject could be a costly mistake, judging by the rising incidence of club root in Scottish oilseed rape crops.

A survey conducted during the laying of a pipeline by Transco revealed that 36% of fields along its length are infected with the disease. Site equipment was zoned in infected areas and disinfected before moving.

What commendable diligence. Lets keep soil where it belongs -in the field where it was found.

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Tag-friendly feeders…East Sussex producer Mike Sherwood found too many suckler cows were losing their tags at Dudwell Farm, Burwash. The reason for high losses were bolts holding two halves of the ring feeder together, says Mr Sherwood. His solution is a length of plastic gutter pipe cut and slipped over each joint. Now, as cows withdraw their heads out of the feeder, the pipe spins and tags stay on.

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

The Celts are coming to take on Beckett

Rivalries between England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales often run high. But English farmers will wish their Celtic neighbours success as they take on DEFRA secretary Margaret Beckett in her attempt to dismantle farm supports.

The increasingly close alliance of farmers and ministers from the three devolved parts of the UK believe their interests are being sidelined by Mrs Beckett as she plays to Downing Streets tune.

English farmers have exactly the same complaint, but have no minister to stand up for them. Mrs Becketts free market agenda contains dangers for all farmers, no matter where they operate in the British Isles.

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Pig muck power is pricey but viable

Where theres muck theres… worry. More particularly how to dispose of it as safely, efficiently and cheaply as possible.

Pig slurry, for example, has value as a potent fertiliser. It can also be used to make electricity. And, with electricity companies under pressure to source power from renewable resources, theres no shortage of demand.

A system for a typical unit offers a return on investment of 14.5%; making it an attractive investment. The only problem is finding the £200,000 needed to build the plant.

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17 May 2002

Young farmers meet in heady atmosphere

It was good to see young farmers out in force at Blackpool. They gathered for the National Federation of Young Farmers Clubs Annual Convention -three days, when rural youngsters meet to combine business and fun.

This years event marked a turning point for the NFYFC as it rebuilds itself after foot-and-mouth. Its certainly enlisted big-name help, with Prince Charles taking over as its new president.

Leaders of the movement remain upbeat about its future and are urging more people to join. We wish them well.

Young Farmers remains one of Britains best youth groups.

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Simmental cattle went under the hammer at Ludlow last week for the first time and met a total clearance rate. The top price of 4100gns was given for Cliftonswood Landlord, from Mike Browns herd from Clifton upon Teme, Worcs. Buyer was Michael Mercer from the Bowley herd, Leominster.

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17 May 2002

Rev George King and villagers walk the fields in Flamstead, Herts, as part of their recent Rogation Sunday service. The event, an ancient rural tradition, sees congregations across Britain walking parish boundaries, blessing crops and saying prayers. "It helps raise awareness of rural issues and helps keep the profile of the church high," says Rev King.

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Court move for fair EUtreatment

During her evidence to the agricultural select committee on Dec 11, 2000, Joyce Quinn, minister of state at MAFF, said: "There is a responsibility on government to ensure that European rules are applied fairly and that our own pig industry does not suffer disproportionately compared to the situation regarding the implementation of European rules in other countries."

The governments decision not to access UK farmers entitlement to £72m agrimoney, forces farmers to suffer disproportionately compared with farmers in other countries. The government should be challenged in the European Courts. If the farming unions are not able to take on this issue, would enough individual farmers pledge 10% of any money received as a result of court action to fund solicitors, such as Class Law, who would work on a no win, no fee contract?

If initial evaluations indicated that there was a strong case in law, it would be important that a large part of the country signed up. Would this work? The potential for publicity is enormous. What role could the internet play? Would the threat of European Court action force the government to change its mind?

Robert Persey

Upcott Farm, Broadhembury, Honiton, Devon.

IACS data is error-strewn

I received my IACS forms for this years claim in good time. Normally, I can go through the 19 Data Sheets and find a few variations and discrepancies such as a decimal point wrong or a small block of fields missing. All quite usual and since I realise that the day I spend doing my IACS is the best paid day of my year, I dont begrudge the ministry its little attempts to trip me up.

This year, however, it has excelled itself. Every single line of every data sheet is wrong. Column C (Field OS Area) is correct, column D (part field area) has figures in for every field instead of only part-fields, and column E1 (a new column of eligible area) has every figure incorrect.

I attempted to put all of this right using the E-IACS system. And I was one of the 4300 people whose forms would not transmit after completion.

My complaint to DEFRA has not brought any apology or redress, merely the usual reply of: "Its not my department, so I cant help you, but do complain in writing if you like."

JG Halfhead

Chestnuts Farm, Sapperton, Sleaford, Lincs.

Importance of biosecurity

I agree whole-heartedly with your article "Biosecurity is all around us now" (Livestock, Apr 19) that it is too costly to ignore. However, the same message did not come across in your leader (Opinion) in the same issue, criticising the biosecurity requirements for shows.

The need for strict biosecurity is keenly appreciated by the majority of show organisers. They are taking a responsible attitude to biosecurity to protect livestock farmers and the wider rural community from another devastating outbreak of animal disease.

The show conditions have been developed in close co-operation with show organisers and other stakeholders and the precautions requested are proportionate to the need to protect the best of our livestock. They simply do not need "armies of staff" or "lakes of disinfectant" to implement. We have asked that, if animals cross a public area, any excrement should be removed and the spot covered, which is good hygienic practice in any case. We do not then ask for disinfection, as it is impractical to disinfect grass.

The government has, for many years, given advice on disease control measures. We intend to launch a new publicity campaign to enforce the biosecurity message in the coming months, aimed not only at farmers but also at the many others who need to be aware of the biosecurity message.

Lord Whitty

Minister for food, farming and waterways, DEFRA, Nobel House, 17 Smith Square, London.

Playtime over for DEFRA

I was interested to read the Situations Vacant advertisement (Classified, Apr 26) placed by DEFRA offering posts in the department. It concluded with the sentence: "All forms must be received in this office by close of play, on Thur, May 16, 2002." This to me epitomises the whole department. While it plays the whole agricultural industry suffers.

Geoff Derges

Ainsworths Homoeopathics, 40 Middlecombe Drive, Barnstaple, Devon.

Open invite for milk debate

May I invite Sean Rickard to respond to David Richardsons fears (May 3) about the consequences of moving milk quotas?

Many farmers believe that if production subsidies and forms of supply management were abolished, as advocated by Mr Rickard, the countryside would revert to a situation reminiscent of the pre-1940 period. Imported corn, beef, lamb, sugar and oilseeds would arrive at prices which would cripple UK agriculture and leave thousands of acres idle. Either Mr Rickard believes this would not happen or that it is inevitable anyway. I would like to know his view.

I do not believe that the New Zealand experience has any relevance to the consequences of removing EU farm subsidies. UK economists regularly inform the country that CAP is costing families £20/week in taxes and higher food prices. At the same time, farmers are providing commodities like wheat, beef and lamb to the food chain at less than the cost of production. So who does gain from the billions used to support EU agriculture? Is it providing the margins which allow supermarket chains to keep growing the chain or is it supporting more bureaucrats than farmers? Such colossal sums must boost EU economics in some way.

Now is the time for reasoned debate on the subject of CAP reform so that the farming community can demonstrate its own hopes and fears.

David Evans

Willoughton, Gainborough, Lincs.

Give examples of benefits

Your correspondent Sean Rickard (Letters, May 3) thinks that he is supporting my lifestyle, because production subsidies maintain an oversupply of farmers and food. Since an average familys food bill has fallen from one-third to one-eighth of family income in 40 years, I think I have been doing the contributing to others lifestyles all my working life.

He is evidently an advocate of unilateral free trade, and I should be grateful if he would be good enough to give one example where this has benefited any nation which has fully embraced the idea? Churchill once said that: "The truth must be given a bodyguard of lies", and nothing is so encrusted with lies as the doctrine of free trade.

G Crisp

Woodside Farm, Privett, Alton, Hants.

Fungicide view is surprising

Call me naive, but I was surprised to see organic advocate Oliver Dowding arguing for the continued use of a fungicide "Organic potatoes copper cut threat" (Arable, Apr 26).

I was under the impression organic farmers did not use chemical pesticides or artificial fertilisers and as such claimed their products to be superior to those farmed conventionally. The article goes on, "…Alternatives to copper needed to be found immediately…", presumably to maintain yield and quality.

That sounds very conventional and could prompt the question: Whats the difference? Just because a fungicide is considered old fashioned, that cannot make it organic, or can it? I believe some blight spray from the late 20th century may offer an alternative.

William Molland

Carters Barn Farm, Piddlehinton, Dorset.

Organic men win the war?

After yet another tirade from Geoffrey Hollis (Talking Point, May 3), those in the organic movement can rejoice in the words of Gandhi. "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they attack you, then

you win." We appeared to have reached stage three!

P Coombs

Weston, Dunsyre, Lanark.

Only good maize varieties on list

Your article (Livestock, May 3) gives credence to the idea that Peter Schofield and Nickerson know more about maize than the rest of us. It is us who are in the right camp. The big advance in maize hybrids that helped the crop to become established here is improved cob maturity.

If the cob is immature the yield is lessened and the silage lacks the starch content that drives animal performance. Also an immature cob brings excessive water into the clamp which can lead to effluent. If we make one mistake with maize silage with mature grains, it is that we do not attack them hard enough. The grains need milling to powder to maximise their animal usage.

I support John Hardys defence of the NIAB Maize Descriptive List. The testing is good and the list appears in two forms to suit all situations indicating which hybrids will give the best yields and which are the earliest to mature.

Huntseeds and KWS are testing maize hybrids on a large scale, but we do not expect growers to rely on our figures. Mr Schofield will find selling maize seed without a NIAB endorsement is like pushing water uphill.

As regards too little emphasis on nutrition, both energy values and starch contents are tested and published and important differences are showing up.

I agree about the need to avoid over mature crops. But the first measurement a hybrid has to achieve is 30% whole plant dry matter in time for a reasonable harvest. To take growers down a road that could result in effluent from immature crops is wrong.

The NIAB List deserves maize growers support. Any variety worth buying is on the NIAB List or heading towards it. The only reason varieties are not entered or withdrawn is because they are not good enough.

Karl Sauter

huntseeds.uk@btinternet.com

Put metal in your pockets

As a reader of farmers weekly but not a farmer, I wonder why so many farmers and landowners are reluctant to earn easy money? I am referring to allowing responsible metal detector users, with up to £2m of insurance, onto their land.

Its money for old rope. In the past 10 days, as secretary and chair of the Central Yorkshire Metal Detecting Club, I have handed over £70 plus in cash to a farmer who lets our club go onto his land in pursuit of our hobby, which is gathering history. All farmers do is to receive the cash. We do the rest. Contact me for more information on 01924-369128 or by e-mail.

Ken Thornton

Secretary and chairman of Central Yorkshire Metal Detecting Club. Cat@K547.fsnet.co.uk

Who are these members?

David Richardsons remarks (May 3) about the MAFF/DEFRA practice of appointing committees of stooges to make recommendations that please the minister reminded me that when William Waldegrave was minister I offered to sit on a committee which was set up to suggest CAP reforms.

I said that since I thought CAP was alright as it then was, I would no doubt be welcomed as a counterbalancing voice to the rest of the committee. Needless to say, my offer was declined. It was clear that only sycophants were welcome. Perhaps it would be a good idea to publish a list of those people who have served with such lack of distinction over the years?

Malcolm Read,

Broadmead Farm, West Grimstead, Salisbury, Wilts.

No loan for agriculture

I write regarding the letter (Apr 19), Youngsters, use your bank. As far as I am aware, the Government Small Firms Loan Guarantee Scheme is not available to the agricultural industry. So it would be of no benefit to farmers. However, good luck to Mr Organ in any application to DEFRA.

Mrs P Ellery

Primrose Cottage, Talskiddy, St Columb Major, Cornwall.

Give back our sheep farming

As the Party leaders tour Eire looking for votes, sheep farmers are voting with their feet and getting out of sheep farming. Over the past two years almost 5000 Irish farmers have left sheep farming.

That seems crazy when the EU is not self sufficient in sheep meat. European sheep farmers produce only 80% of the lamb that is eaten in Europe and most of the rest is imported from New Zealand.

As the European beef mountain gets bigger, sheep farmers are leaving farming because it is not worth their while to produce an agricultural commodity that there is a ready market for. Many of these sheep farmers are getting into beef and that is putting pressure on our beef industry, which is already in crisis.

The Irish Cattle and Sheep Association has been lobbying on sheep extensification since 1999. ICSA is calling for the first 150 sheep to be taken out of the stocking calculation for extensification premium. ICSA was unhappy that the present government failed to secure an increase in the ewe premium and therefore failed to improve the livelihood on sheep farms. ICSA wants the future government to put every effort into encouraging Brussels to take the first 150 sheep of out the equation for extensification purposes and put a future back into sheep farming.

John Deegan

ICSA, vice-president, National Office, Lyster House, Portlaoise, Co Laois, Eire.

EU incapable of CAP reform

Devon county councillors, Brian Greenslade and Derrick Spear, warn farmers and the rural community that the EU is significantly reducing agricultural subsidies so that eastern European countries, like Poland, can be financially enticed to join an enlarged EU. After all, there is only so much money to go around.

They are right to be gravely concerned. The EU is incapable of reforming the CAP: Ask the Conservatives who have been trying for 20 years.

Devon county councils response to this further crisis is to organise a conference in Exeter. Another talking shop is not the answer when our farmers are facing ruin and need long term economically viable support if we wish to produce our own food.

Since our government has no control over our farming and fishing industries, the only way our county councillors can give realistic support is to campaign for a return of power from Brussels. However, they are reluctant to do this, because their political Parties gave it away in the first place!

Also, how does the NFU think it is representing its members interest when it also supports the EU and its disastrous policies? Perhaps Anthony Gibson could enlighten us?

Michael Pagram

Chairman, UK Independence Party, North Devon, 33 Shoreands Road, Barnstaple.

Barley not wheat in TV ad

Has anyone else noticed that the handful of corn shown on the Shredded Wheat advert, featuring Ian Botham, is, in fact, a handful of barley?

Mrs J M Cooper

Lodge Farm, The Street, Horham, Eye, Suffolk.

TV types get it all wrong

After listening recently to children in Scotland thinking that oranges come from Scotland and not knowing where eggs come from, I have just watched Ian Bothams TV commercial for shredded wheat. Although the advertisement talks about wheat, he is holding grains of barley. If even the town-brained TV folk dont know the differences in types of grain, what chance have we farmers got?

Monty Andrew

Holmes Farm, Aldgate, Ketton, Stamford, Lincs.

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Archive Article: 2002/05/17

17 May 2002

Farming brothers Chris and David Moore secured a £120,000 processing and marketing grant towards the £500,000 cost of expanding their beetroot and potato-growing venture in north-east Lincs (left). Storage for a further 1500t of produce was installed as well as a new grading line, new office accommodation and access roads.

The beetroot crop is processed by Davids wifes family business AxgroFoods, which markets the beetroot crop in supermarkets and shops throughout the UK and into Europe.

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